Literature

Faculty

John Alba Cutler

John Alba Cutler, an associate professor of English and Latina/o Studies, specializes in US Latino literatures, multiethnic American poetry, contemporary American literature, and print culture studies. His book Ends of Assimilation: The Formation of Chicano Literature, published by Oxford University Press, examines how Chicano/a (Mexican American) literary works represent processes of assimilation, and what those representations can teach us about race, gender, and the nature of literary discourse. Professor Cutler has published articles in American Literary History, American Literature, MELUS, and Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies. He is a member of the Executive Committee for the Latina/o Literature and Culture Forum of the Modern Language Association, and also co-directs the Newberry Library Seminar in Borderlands and Latino Studies. He received the Weinberg College Distinguished Teaching Award in 2013.

Currently teaching:Special Topics: The US-Mexico Border in Literature and Film

Kate Baldwin

Kate Baldwin is a 20th-century Americanist who specializes in comparative theories of gender, race, and ethnicity. Her work focuses on intersections between the mappings of identity and social history in a global context, with a particular focus on Russia and the former Soviet Union. She has published two books, The Racial Imaginary of the Cold War Kitchen: From Sokol’niki Park to Chicago’s South Side (2016) and Beyond the Color Line and the Iron Curtain: Reading Encounters between Black and Red, 1922-63. Baldwin teaches frequently in the MALS/MALIT programs and enjoys working with adult students and introducing them to the rich academic and intellectual opportunities that Northwestern has to offer. In addition to her academic writing, Baldwin has published articles in Huffington Post, The Hill, Truth-Out, Global Post and Quartz. Her Ph.D. is from Yale University.

Currently teaching:Bad Mothers: Ideologies of Female Failure in Twentieth Century Literature, Media, and Film
Special Topics: Feminism in Trumplandia
Special Topics: Feminism in Trumplandia

George Bond

George Bond is a professor of religious studies at Northwestern and a specialist in Buddhist studies and the history of religions. His teaching focuses on Buddhism, Hinduism and the history of religions generally. His research deals primarily with Theravada Buddhism, studying the religion and its texts as well as the lived practice of Buddhism in Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia. He has been a recipient of Northwestern’s Charles Deering McCormick Professorship of Teaching Excellence, the Northwestern Alumni Association’s Award for Excellence in Teaching and the Weinberg College Outstanding Teaching Award. He is the author of numerous articles and books, including The Buddhist Revival in Sri Lanka, Buddhism at Work: the Sarvodaya Movement in Sri Lanka, The Word of the Buddha, and Sainthood: Its Manifestations in World Religions, which he coauthored and edited with Richard Kieckhefer.

Currently teaching:Seminar in Liberal Studies II: Asian Religions in Literature and Film

Gerald Butters

Gerald Butters is a historian of film specializing in the intersection of race and gender in motion pictures. A Fulbright scholar, Butters has lectured on film in Romania, Luxembourg, France and Canada and at many American universities. His books include Black Manhood on the Silent Screen, Banned in Kansas: Motion Picture Censorship, 1915–1966, and the upcoming From Sweetback to Superfly: Race and Film Audiences in Chicago's Loop. He is editor of an anthology on Blaxploitation films. Butters received his Phd in History from the University of Kansas.

Currently teaching: Black Chicago: From Du Sable to Black Lives Matter

Scott Durham

Scott Durham, associate professor of French, is the faculty director for the MALit program and chair of the French and Italian department at Northwestern. He has taught both graduate and undergraduate courses in French and comparative literature since 1994, with a primary focus on 20th-century literature, film and the relationship between literature and philosophy. His scholarly publications since he completed his doctorate at Yale include Phantom Communities: The Simulacrum and the Limits of Postmodernism (Stanford University Press), Jean Genet: In the Language of the Enemy (a special number he edited for Yale French Studies) and numerous articles. He is completing work on a book with the working title The Archive and the Monad: Deleuze and the Resistance to Postmodernism.Durham earned his Phd from Yale University.

Currently teaching:Topics in Comparative Literature: Fictions of the City -- Paris, New York, Los Angeles

Michael Kramer

Michael J. Kramer holds a visiting assistant professorship at Northwestern University, where he teaches history, American studies, digital humanities, and civic engagement. He also is an editor in the Design, Publishing, and New Media Department at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. His book, The Republic of Rock: Music and Citizenship in the Sixties Counterculture, was published by Oxford University Press in 2013, and he has written about history, art, culture, and politics for numerous publications. His current book project, "This Machine Kills Fascists: Technology and Culture in the US Folk Music Revival," revises understandings of the folk revival as an anti-modernist movement. As part of the book project, he is developing a multimedia project (website, coffeetable book catalogue, exhibition) about the Berkeley Folk Music Festival (1958-1970). He is also in the early stages of a book on the poet, folklorist, Lincoln biographer, and socialist Carl Sandburg. He is on the steering committee of the Chicago Dance History Project, an oral history and archival digital documentation of dance in the city and its Midwest surroundings, and he serves as the dramaturg for The Seldoms, a contemporary dance company in Chicago. He graduated from Columbia University and received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. He is the co-founder of the Northwestern University Digital Humanities Laboratory, writes about digital topics at Issues in Digital History, and blogs about art, culture, and politics at Culture Rover.

Currently teaching:Introduction to Digital Studies

Bill Savage

Bill Savage (PhD Northwestern) has been teaching in the SPS MALit program for almost two decades. He is a scholar of Chicago literature, history, and culture, and his most recent publication is an annotated edition of George Ade’s The Old-Time Saloon: Not Wet, Not Dry—Just History (1931; University of Chicago Press, 2016). He also co-edited and annotated Chicago by Day and Night: The Pleasure Seeker’s Guide to the Paris of America (1892; Northwestern University Press, 2013). His current research focuses on popular culture and dynamics of urban space, especially focused on vernacular architectural matters like the design of hot dog stands and saloons. He writes book reviews and op-ed essays regularly for local media, and performs frequently in various live lit venues, including The Paper Machete. He is a lifelong resident of Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood.

Currently teaching:Chicago Transformed: Actual and Textual Cities