Liberal Studies

Faculty

John Alba Cutler

John Alba Cutler, an associate professor of English and Latina/o Studies, specializes in US Latino literatures, multiethnic American poetry, contemporary American literature, and print culture studies. His book Ends of Assimilation: The Formation of Chicano Literature, published by Oxford University Press, examines how Chicano/a (Mexican American) literary works represent processes of assimilation, and what those representations can teach us about race, gender, and the nature of literary discourse. Professor Cutler has published articles in American Literary History, American Literature, MELUS, and Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies. He is a member of the Executive Committee for the Latina/o Literature and Culture Forum of the Modern Language Association, and also co-directs the Newberry Library Seminar in Borderlands and Latino Studies. He received the Weinberg College Distinguished Teaching Award in 2013.

Currently teaching:Special Topics: The US-Mexico Border in Literature and Film

Kate Baldwin

Kate Baldwin is a 20th-century Americanist who specializes in comparative theories of gender, race, and ethnicity. Her work focuses on intersections between the mappings of identity and social history in a global context, with a particular focus on Russia and the former Soviet Union. She has published two books, The Racial Imaginary of the Cold War Kitchen: From Sokol’niki Park to Chicago’s South Side (2016) and Beyond the Color Line and the Iron Curtain: Reading Encounters between Black and Red, 1922-63. Baldwin teaches frequently in the MALS/MALIT programs and enjoys working with adult students and introducing them to the rich academic and intellectual opportunities that Northwestern has to offer. In addition to her academic writing, Baldwin has published articles in Huffington Post, The Hill, Truth-Out, Global Post and Quartz. Her Ph.D. is from Yale University.

Currently teaching:Bad Mothers:Â Ideologies of Female Failure in Twentieth Century Literature, Media, and Film
Special Topics: Feminism in Trumplandia

George Bond

George Bond is a professor of religious studies at Northwestern and a specialist in Buddhist studies and the history of religions. His teaching focuses on Buddhism, Hinduism and the history of religions generally. His research deals primarily with Theravada Buddhism, studying the religion and its texts as well as the lived practice of Buddhism in Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia. He has been a recipient of Northwestern’s Charles Deering McCormick Professorship of Teaching Excellence, the Northwestern Alumni Association’s Award for Excellence in Teaching and the Weinberg College Outstanding Teaching Award. He is the author of numerous articles and books, including The Buddhist Revival in Sri Lanka, Buddhism at Work: the Sarvodaya Movement in Sri Lanka, The Word of the Buddha, and Sainthood: Its Manifestations in World Religions, which he coauthored and edited with Richard Kieckhefer.

Currently teaching:Seminar in Liberal Studies II: Asian Religions in Literature and Film

Geraldo Cadava

Geraldo Cadava, an Associate Professor of History and Latina/o Studies, specializes in the histories of Latinas and Latinos in the United States, the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, and Latin American immigration to the United States. His first book, Standing on Common Ground: The Making of a Sunbelt Borderland (Harvard University Press, 2013 & 2016), is about cultural and commercial ties between Arizona and Sonora, Mexico, since World War II. It won the Frederick Jackson Turner prize, awarded annually by the Organization of American Historians to the author of the best first book in any field of American History. He is currently writing a history of Latino Conservatism from the 1960s to the 1990s. His scholarly and popular essays have appeared in the Journal of American History, The New York Times, and The Atlantic, among other publications. As a lifelong learner himself, he is especially interested in working students in Northwestern’s School of Professional Studies.

Currently teaching:From Hamilton to “Hamilton” – American History by Lin Manuel Miranda

Brett Crawford

Brett Crawford is a faculty member at the Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business and the Department of Sociology at the University of Pittsburgh, and has also held visiting positions at Stanford University and the University of Michigan. His research explores how organizations use history and policy to construct institutional meaning. He has also studied how education policy and associations’ codes of ethics shape students’ strategies for success in the health sciences. Crawford’s current research includes a pair of projects funded by separate grants. The first project explores the historicity of environmental associations, specifically how associations have reshaped the identity of actors to both protect the meaning of environmentalism and disrupt industries that threaten that meaning. The second project explores how stigmatized issues are shaped into legitimate categories through the work of organizations. Crawford earned his Phd from Copenhagen Business School.

Currently teaching:International Institutions

Scott Durham

Scott Durham, associate professor of French, is the faculty director for the MALit program and chair of the French and Italian department at Northwestern. He has taught both graduate and undergraduate courses in French and comparative literature since 1994, with a primary focus on 20th-century literature, film and the relationship between literature and philosophy. His scholarly publications since he completed his doctorate at Yale include Phantom Communities: The Simulacrum and the Limits of Postmodernism (Stanford University Press), Jean Genet: In the Language of the Enemy (a special number he edited for Yale French Studies) and numerous articles. He is completing work on a book with the working title The Archive and the Monad: Deleuze and the Resistance to Postmodernism.Durham earned his Phd from Yale University.

Currently teaching:Topics in Comparative Literature: Fictions of the City -- Paris, New York, Los Angeles
Special Topics in Literature: Proust

Brian Edwards

Brian T. Edwards is Crown Professor in Middle East Studies and Professor of English, Comparative Literary Studies, and American Studies at Northwestern, where he also is director of the Program in Middle East and North African Studies. He is the author of Morocco Bound: Disorienting America's Maghreb, from Casablanca to the Marrakech Express (Duke U Press, 2005), and After the American Century: The Ends of U.S. Culture in the Middle East (Columbia U Press, 2016), as well as numerous essays and articles in publications including Salon, The Believer, McSweeney's, Public Culture, Chronicle of Higher Education, Michigan Quarterly Review, Foreign Policy, Bookforum, and leading scholarly journals. Edwards is co-editor of Globalizing American Studies (U of Chicago Press, 2010), a collection of essays that provides global perspectives on US history and culture, and editor of On the Ground: New Directions in Middle East and North African Studies (NU-Q 2013, and available online here). Educated at Yale University (B.A., M.A., Ph.D.), Edwards has lectured extensively in the US and abroad, including in Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt, Lebanon, Iran, Turkey, Qatar, Kyrgyzstan, and India, and has been visiting faculty at University of Tehran, EHESS in Paris, and UC Dublin, as well as a Fulbright Senior Specialist at Cairo University and the University of Naples, Italy. He has taught in the MA Lit and MALS program for several years and particularly enjoys working with adult learners.

 

 

Currently teaching:Introduction to Graduate Studies in Literary and Cultural Analysis
Introduction to Graduate Studies in Literary and Cultural Analysis

Jillana Enteen

Jillana B. Enteen is an Associate Professor in Gender & Sexuality Studies and serves on the Asian American Studies and Asian Studies Program Faculty. She is the co-convener of NUDHL, Northwestern University’s Digital Humanities Lab, sponsored by the Kaplan Humanities Institute. A former Fulbright Fellow to Thailand, she specializes in Thai culture and literature in English as well as non-Thai depictions of Thailand. Enteen’s publications concern online depictions of race, gender, sexuality, and nation in English by overlooked internet populations and the use of English language terms for sexualities and genders in the urban cultures of Thailand. Currently, Dr. Enteen is researching Gender Reassignment Surgeries (GRS) available in Thailand for international consumption via internet communication with the support of a SPAN Faculty Grant. Her manuscripts are Import / Export: English Language terms for Genders and Sexualities in Thailand (Onyx, 2015) which examines the ways in which English is adapted and adopted by local Bangkok subcultures for specifically Thai purposes and how this study is situated within transnational sexualities studies and Virtual English: Queer Internets and Digital Creolization (Routledge, 2009). Enteen published 6 OpEds last year in outlets ranging from Ms. Magazine to the Hill. She teaches courses on "Queer Theory," "Transnational Sexualities," “Transitions: Medical Tourism and Theorizing Transnational Studies of Sexuality,” “CyberQueer,” "Thai Medical Tourism and Sex," "The Politics of Public Space," and "Imagining the Internet: Gender, Sexuality, Race & Ethnicity Online."

Currently teaching:Seminar in Liberal Studies: Imagining the Internet: Fiction, Film and Theory

Kasey Evans

Kasey Evans, associate professor of English at Northwestern, teaches and writes about medieval and Renaissance literature. In 2012, her book was released titled Colonial Temperance: The Strategy of Virtue in Early Modern England, which argues that the virtue of temperance underwent a semantic sea-change during the English Renaissance, evolving from a paradigm of self-discipline and moderation into a value of time-management, efficiency, and colonial aggression. Areas of particular interest include English Renaissance adaptations of Italian poetry (Dante, Ariosto, Tasso); ideologies of race, gender, and sexuality as they shape Renaissance English literature; and literary and critical theory, from medieval exegetes through postmodern philosophers. Evans received her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.

Currently teaching:The Seven Deadly Sins: Behaving Badly in Renaissance Thought, Art, and Literature

David Faller

David Faller has extensive experience in applying the theories of monetary economics and international trade to the solution of real-life issues arising in international business and financial markets. Having started his career as a financial markets trader in Europe, Faller has created and managed derivatives market making businesses, high frequency proprietary trading teams and provided advice on currency exposure management issues to multi-national corporations and governmental bodies in Europe, Asia and the Americas. While leading the global treasury activities of a NASDAQ listed technology company, he was responsible for opening branches in a number of emerging countries where his knowledge of cultural diversity, trade and tariff regulations and international tax regimes were critical in the country location process. He has been teaching courses on international business and capital markets to under-graduate and graduate levels students since 2003. Faller holds an MBA from the Lake Forest Graduate School of Management and did graduate studies at the Europa Instituut, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Netherlands, specializing in the economic and legal issues facing member states in economically and politically integrated sovereign areas.

Currently teaching:Global Economic Policy

Elzbieta Foeller-Pituch

Elzbieta Foeller-Pituch (Assistant Director, Chabraja Center for Historical Studies, Northwestern University) is a literary historian who has published articles on contemporary authors such as John Barth and John Gardner, on Henry James, and on the international aspect of American studies. Her current research focuses on the reception of classical antiquity in American culture, a topic that stems from her research during an American Council of Learned Societies fellowship at Harvard University. Her most recent publication is a chapter in American Women and Classical Myths, ed. Gregory Staley (Baylor UP, 2009) on Athena as a cultural icon in the United States. She is working on a book-length study of the enduring influence of Greek and Roman myths in American fiction and culture. Elzbieta teaches classes on 20th-century experimental East European and American fiction, global and American postmodern fiction, and American 19th-century literary culture. Foeller-Pituch earned her Phd at the University of Warsaw.

Currently teaching:Topics: Victorian Travel and Crime Fiction

Angela Fontes

Angela Fontes has a dual appointment as an assistant professor of human development and family resources at Illinois State University and senior economist in the statistics and methodology department at the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago. Centering on family financial well-being, her research uses national data sets, including the Survey of Consumer Finances, the Survey of Income and Program Participation and the Consumer Expenditure Survey. She is the director on several major projects of the US Census Bureau and works with a broad range of public and private clients on analytic research. Fontes’s research has been published in journals such as Health Affairs, the Journal of Family and Economic Issues, the Journal of Women, Politics and Policy, Financial Counseling and Planning and the International Journal of Transportation Research. Before the NORC, Fontes worked in predictive analytics and market research consulting with Chamberlain Research Consultants and Leo Burnett; her clients included Wachovia Bank and Phillip Morris USA. Fontes earned a PhD from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in consumer behavior and family economics.

Currently teaching:Behavioral Economics

Stephen Harding

Stephen Harding is an adjunct professor and advisory board member in the master of public administration program at the University of La Verne. He is also a senior consultant with the Kosmont Companies, a 25-year-old real estate, financial and governmental advisory firm serving multiple public and private sector clients throughout California. He provides city management, financial, organizational, economic development, land-use and real estate advisory services to municipal agencies. Over his 35-year career he has advised more than 40 public and private sector clients and has been city manager or interim city manager in four municipalities, president of the San Diego Southeast Economic Development Corporation, executive director of the Santa Ana Redevelopment Agency and Housing Authority and director of Pasadena development services. He has been the International City/County Management Association’s City Manager in Residence at the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at California State University, Fullerton. He serves the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration in the accreditation of MPA programs. Harding earned an MPA from California State University, Long Beach.

Currently teaching:The Global City

Khusro Kidwai

Khusro Kidwai is the Assistant Dean for Distance Learning at Northwestern University’s School of Professional Studies. In this role he collaborates with the School’s leadership and Office of Distance Learning staff to establish and implement a vision for online learning. He is responsible for overseeing partnerships with other offices in the school – Graduate Programs, Undergraduate Programs, Professional & Post-Baccalaureate Programs, Marketing, and Student Services. Prior to joining Northwestern University, he was the Director of Online Teaching and Learning and the Director of the Center of Technology Enhanced Learning at the University of Southern Maine (2010-2012) and Research Associate at the John A. Dutton e-Education Institute at Pennsylvania State University (2009-2012).

He received his Ph.D. degree from the Instructional Systems program at Pennsylvania State University in 2009. His doctoral work focused on the design and development of a web-based reading environment. In 2013 he was elected to the Board of Directors of the International Board of Standards in Performance, Training and Instruction (IBSTPI).

Currently teaching:Instructional Design

Michael Kramer

Michael J. Kramer holds a visiting assistant professorship at Northwestern University, where he teaches history, American studies, digital humanities, and civic engagement. He also is an editor in the Design, Publishing, and New Media Department at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. His book, The Republic of Rock: Music and Citizenship in the Sixties Counterculture, was published by Oxford University Press in 2013, and he has written about history, art, culture, and politics for numerous publications. His current book project, "This Machine Kills Fascists: Technology and Culture in the US Folk Music Revival," revises understandings of the folk revival as an anti-modernist movement. As part of the book project, he is developing a multimedia project (website, coffeetable book catalogue, exhibition) about the Berkeley Folk Music Festival (1958-1970). He is also in the early stages of a book on the poet, folklorist, Lincoln biographer, and socialist Carl Sandburg. He is on the steering committee of the Chicago Dance History Project, an oral history and archival digital documentation of dance in the city and its Midwest surroundings, and he serves as the dramaturg for The Seldoms, a contemporary dance company in Chicago. He graduated from Columbia University and received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. He is the co-founder of the Northwestern University Digital Humanities Laboratory, writes about digital topics at Issues in Digital History, and blogs about art, culture, and politics at Culture Rover.

Currently teaching:Introduction to Digital Studies

Gregory Kuhn

Gregory Kuhn currently is director of government management consulting at Sikich LLP and was assistant director for public management and training at Northern Illinois University’s Center for Governmental Studies. Kuhn has more than 28 years of combined governmental, consulting and higher education experience. He was the inaugural faculty director of the MPPA program and continues to be program adviser and lecturer. His primary teaching areas include public policy, leadership, public administration and budgeting. He also served as an instructor/lecturer for Northern Illinois University’s public administration program, and he has earned teaching awards at both NIU and SCS. Kuhn earned an MPA and PhD in public administration, public policy and organizational theory from Northern Illinois University.

Currently teaching:Scope and Theory of Public Policy

Glenn LeBlanc

Glenn LeBlanc is a freelance learning designer with Northwestern University’s School of Professional Studies, working to develop courses in the Predictive Analytics and Information Design and Strategy programs. Prior to joining Northwestern, he was Senior Instructional Designer at University College in the University of Maine System, where for over 20 years he worked with faculty teaching at a distance using multiple technologies, including interactive television, the Blackboard course management system, videoconferencing, desktop conferencing, and screencasting. In addition to his freelance work at Northwestern, LeBlanc also works as a Network Instructional Designer for Southern New Hampshire University.

His interest in providing educational opportunities for rural and under-served students began as a Peace Corps Biology and Math teacher in a village government secondary school in Cameroon in the early 1980s. He pursued this interest with a focus on Anthropology and Education, completed a Master’s degree in Anthropology at Syracuse University, and completed all course work in the Ph.D. program in Instructional Design, Development and Evaluation at Syracuse University School of Education.

Currently teaching:Instructional Design

Jessica Mansbach

Jessica Mansbach is currently a Learning Designer at Northwestern University’s School of Professional Studies. In this role, she partners with faculty throughout the School to design online courses. She also teaches masters level classes at Northwestern University’s School of Education and Social Policy. Mansbach holds a doctorate degree in Higher, Adult, and Lifelong Education from Michigan State University and master’s degree in Social Work from University of Pennsylvania. Before joining the School of Professional Studies, Jessica coordinated a teaching apprenticeship for College of Education graduate students at Michigan State University. Her teaching interests include online learning, adult student development, and student leadership.

Currently teaching:Introduction to Learning Theory

Michelle Molina

J. Michelle Molina (PhD, University of Chicago, 2004) studies the Society of Jesus in the early modern period. She explores Jesuit spirituality in an effort to understand how individuals – both elite and commoner - approached and experienced religious transformation. In particular, she has been interested in examining the impact of the Ignatian Spiritual Exercises – a meditative retreat geared toward self-reform – on early modern global expansion. Molina’s book, To Overcome Oneself: The Jesuit Ethic and the Spirit of Global Expansion is published with University of California Press. Bearing witness to events in her own era, Molina has explained what it might mean that the new pope is a Jesuit. She has observed that it is best to situate this Jesuit pope in relation to the modes of self-formation found in the Ignatian Spiritual Exercises and, importantly, that this Catholic imperative to “know thyself” indicates that Pope Francis is well versed in what has been termed “philosophy as a way of life.” She enjoys teaching classes on colonial Mexican history, early modern globalization, existentialist film, including those of Woody Allen. Molina particularly appreciates the questions and the focus that adult learners bring to class discussions every week.

Currently teaching:Seminar in Liberal Studies: Religion, Existentialism, and Film

David Noffs

In 2005 David Noffs joined Columbia College Chicago as an Instructional Technologist and Designer in the Center for Instructional Technology to oversee the development of online interactive tools and the use of Learning Management Systems (LMS’s). In this capacity, he supervised the installation of a campus-wide Moodle (Modular Object Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment) LMS in 2008 and development of training programs for students, faculty and staff. Noffs’ work grew to include not only teaching faculty and staff ways to use technology in the classroom, but also oversight of the creation of faculty led virtual learning communities, and non-stop facilitated online courses for faculty and staff development. In addition, he helped develop and teach workshops for mobile app development, on-line coursework development (instructional design), grade book design, portfolio design, and an array of online teaching tools, including integration of social media into virtual learning community sites. Noffs joined Northwestern University School of Professional Studies in 2015 as a faculty developer. His doctoral dissertation in Adult and Continuing Education from National Louis University is entitled, Resonating Frequencies of a Virtual Learning Community: An Ethnographic Case Study of Online Faculty Development at Columbia College Chicago. In his spare time, Noffs also teaches courses in Sound Design, Web Design, Coding, iOS and C# Programming at Columbia’s department of Interactive Arts and Media.

Currently teaching:Learning Environment Design

Eric Patrick

Eric Patrick is an associate professor at Northwestern University in the School of Communication. Prior to working at Northwestern, Patrick was an animator for the Peabody award winning and Emmy nominated Nickelodeon program Blues Clues. He has been the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, and his work has won numerous awards both domestically and internationally, including awards at The Black Maria Film Festival, The Humboldt International Film Festival, Semana de Cine Experimental de Madrid, South by Southwest Film Festival, The Ann Arbor Film Festival, and Festival de Cinema Independent de Barcelona. His own independent animated films include Stark Film, Ablution and Retrocognition. He received his MFA from the California Institute of the Arts.

Currently teaching:Visual Communication

Pamela Ransom

Pamela Ransom has been active as an environmentalist, planner, researcher, educator and community activist. For more than eight years she was special assistant for environmental affairs for New York City Mayor David Dinkins. Then she moved into international activism as director of health and environment for the Women’s Environment and Development Organization. She worked closely with the late Congresswoman Bella Abzug, spoke to a variety of UN meetings and international conferences and organized major events at venues such as the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing. She has also served on the faculty of Long Island University School of Business, Public Administration and Information. Ransom received her doctorate from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Currently teaching:Scope and Theory of Public Policy
Scope and Theory of Public Policy

Bill Savage

Bill Savage (PhD Northwestern) has been teaching in the SPS MALit program for almost two decades. He is a scholar of Chicago literature, history, and culture, and his most recent publication is an annotated edition of George Ade’s The Old-Time Saloon: Not Wet, Not Dry—Just History (1931; University of Chicago Press, 2016). He also co-edited and annotated Chicago by Day and Night: The Pleasure Seeker’s Guide to the Paris of America (1892; Northwestern University Press, 2013). His current research focuses on popular culture and dynamics of urban space, especially focused on vernacular architectural matters like the design of hot dog stands and saloons. He writes book reviews and op-ed essays regularly for local media, and performs frequently in various live lit venues, including The Paper Machete. He is a lifelong resident of Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood.

Currently teaching:Chicago Transformed: Actual and Textual Cities

Daniel Stolz

Daniel Stolz is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of History and Program in Science and Human Culture at Northwestern University. His research and teaching center on the history of science, technology, and Islam in the modern Middle East. His current book project, a history of astronomy and Islam in late Ottoman Egypt, explores the changing relationship of science, religion, and the state in the transformative years of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He is also beginning a new project on the history of reading science in the Qur’an. Stolz has a forthcoming article on the history of mechanical timekeeping in The International Journal of Middle East Studies, and has previously published work in The Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies and Arabica. He received his PhD in Near Eastern Studies and a graduate certificate in the Program in the History of Science from Princeton University in 2013.

Currently teaching:Special Topics in Liberal Studies: Technology and Revolution in the Middle East

Jane Winston

Jane Winston is associate professor of French and gender studies, director of the Gender Studies Program and Jean Gimbel Lane Professor at the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities at Northwestern. Her primary interests are in literary and cultural studies, the politics of representation, gender and race studies, feminist thought and political theory and transnational and globalization studies. She is the author of Postcolonial Duras: Cultural Memory in Postwar France and coeditor of Vietnam: Identities in Dialogue. Winston received her PhD from Duke University.

Currently teaching:Contemporary French and Francophone Women’s Writing