Literature

Faculty

Daniel Born

Daniel Born, author of The Birth of Liberal Guilt in the English Novel: Charles Dickens to H. G. Wells, has edited numerous anthologies including The Seven Deadly Sins Sampler, and his articles and essays have appeared in academic journals and mainstream publications including Conradiana, Literature and Theology, the New York Times, and forbes.com. Born received his PhD in English literature in 1990 from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, where he studied with Irving Howe and Alfred Kazin. He was an associate professor at Marietta College where he earned the McCoy Award for Teaching Excellence twice, and later served as chief of staff and vice president at the Great Books Foundation. 

Currently teaching:Introduction to Graduate Study

Kasey Evans

Kasey Evans, associate professor of English at Northwestern, teaches and writes about medieval and Renaissance literature. In 2012, her book was released titled Colonial Temperance: The Strategy of Virtue in Early Modern England, which argues that the virtue of temperance underwent a semantic sea-change during the English Renaissance, evolving from a paradigm of self-discipline and moderation into a value of time-management, efficiency, and colonial aggression. Areas of particular interest include English Renaissance adaptations of Italian poetry (Dante, Ariosto, Tasso); ideologies of race, gender, and sexuality as they shape Renaissance English literature; and literary and critical theory, from medieval exegetes through postmodern philosophers. Evans received her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.

Currently teaching:The Seven Deadly Sins: Behaving Badly in Renaissance Thought, Art, and Literature
Topics: Conceptions of the Body in Midieval Literature

Michael Kramer

Michael J. Kramer holds a visiting assistant professorship at Northwestern University, where he teaches history, American studies, digital humanities, and civic engagement. He also is an editor in the Design, Publishing, and New Media Department at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. His book, The Republic of Rock: Music and Citizenship in the Sixties Counterculture, was published by Oxford University Press in 2013, and he has written about history, art, culture, and politics for numerous publications. His current book project, "This Machine Kills Fascists: Technology and Culture in the US Folk Music Revival," revises understandings of the folk revival as an anti-modernist movement. As part of the book project, he is developing a multimedia project (website, coffeetable book catalogue, exhibition) about the Berkeley Folk Music Festival (1958-1970). He is also in the early stages of a book on the poet, folklorist, Lincoln biographer, and socialist Carl Sandburg. He is on the steering committee of the Chicago Dance History Project, an oral history and archival digital documentation of dance in the city and its Midwest surroundings, and he serves as the dramaturg for The Seldoms, a contemporary dance company in Chicago. He graduated from Columbia University and received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. He is the co-founder of the Northwestern University Digital Humanities Laboratory, writes about digital topics at Issues in Digital History, and blogs about art, culture, and politics at Culture Rover.

Currently teaching:Introduction to Digital Studies