Literature

Faculty

Daniel Born

Daniel Born, author of The Birth of Liberal Guilt in the English Novel: Charles Dickens to H. G. Wells, has edited numerous anthologies including The Seven Deadly Sins Sampler, and his articles and essays have appeared in academic journals and mainstream publications including Conradiana, Literature and Theology, the New York Times, and forbes.com. Born received his PhD in English literature in 1990 from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, where he studied with Irving Howe and Alfred Kazin. He was an associate professor at Marietta College where he earned the McCoy Award for Teaching Excellence twice, and later served as chief of staff and vice president at the Great Books Foundation. 

Currently teaching:Introduction to Graduate Study

Kasey Evans

Kasey Evans, associate professor of English at Northwestern, teaches and writes about medieval and Renaissance literature. In 2012, her book was released titled Colonial Temperance: The Strategy of Virtue in Early Modern England, which argues that the virtue of temperance underwent a semantic sea-change during the English Renaissance, evolving from a paradigm of self-discipline and moderation into a value of time-management, efficiency, and colonial aggression. Areas of particular interest include English Renaissance adaptations of Italian poetry (Dante, Ariosto, Tasso); ideologies of race, gender, and sexuality as they shape Renaissance English literature; and literary and critical theory, from medieval exegetes through postmodern philosophers. Evans received her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.

Currently teaching:The Seven Deadly Sins: Behaving Badly in Renaissance Thought, Art, and Literature

Elzbieta Foeller-Pituch

Elzbieta Foeller-Pituch (Assistant Director, Chabraja Center for Historical Studies, Northwestern University) is a literary historian who has published articles on contemporary authors such as John Barth and John Gardner, on Henry James, and on the international aspect of American studies. Her current research focuses on the reception of classical antiquity in American culture, a topic that stems from her research during an American Council of Learned Societies fellowship at Harvard University. Her most recent publication is a chapter in American Women and Classical Myths, ed. Gregory Staley (Baylor UP, 2009) on Athena as a cultural icon in the United States. She is working on a book-length study of the enduring influence of Greek and Roman myths in American fiction and culture. Elzbieta teaches classes on 20th-century experimental East European and American fiction, global and American postmodern fiction, and American 19th-century literary culture. Foeller-Pituch earned her Phd at the University of Warsaw.

Currently teaching:Topics: Victorian Travel and Crime Fiction

Michael Kramer

Michael J. Kramer works at the intersection of historical scholarship, the arts, digital technology, and cultural criticism. He is the author of The Republic of Rock: Music and Citizenship in the Sixties Counterculture (Oxford University Press, 2013; paperback, 2017). His current research explores the relationship between technology and tradition in the US folk music revival from the early twentieth century to the present; it includes a multimodal digital history project about the Berkeley Folk Music Festival, which took place annually on the University of California-Berkeley campus between 1958 and 1970, as well as more technical research on image sonification for historical interpretation, machine-learning sound analysis software, and the design of the digital essay. Future research focuses on the history of arts criticism in the United States, an intellectual history of the anarchist imagination in America, a history of the service worker in the US, and a biography of Chicago dance critic Ann Barzel. He teaches history and American studies at Middlebury College, where he is Associate Director of the Digital Liberal Arts. He has previously taught at Northwestern University, where he co-founded NUDHL, the Northwestern University Digital Humanities Laboratory. He also freelances as a dance dramaturg and an editorial consultant. He writes about history, the arts, politics, digital humanities, and other topics for numerous publications and blogs at michaeljkramer.net.

Currently teaching:Introduction to Digital Studies