Liberal Studies

Faculty

Gerald Butters

Gerald Butters is a historian of film specializing in the intersection of race and gender in motion pictures. A Fulbright scholar, Butters has lectured on film in Romania, Luxembourg, France and Canada and at many American universities. His books include Black Manhood on the Silent Screen, Banned in Kansas: Motion Picture Censorship, 1915–1966, and the upcoming From Sweetback to Superfly: Race and Film Audiences in Chicago's Loop. He is editor of an anthology on Blaxploitation films. Butters received his Phd in History from the University of Kansas.

Currently teaching: Black Chicago: From Du Sable to Black Lives Matter

Michael Kramer

Michael J. Kramer holds a visiting assistant professorship at Northwestern University, where he teaches history, American studies, digital humanities, and civic engagement. He also is an editor in the Design, Publishing, and New Media Department at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. His book, The Republic of Rock: Music and Citizenship in the Sixties Counterculture, was published by Oxford University Press in 2013, and he has written about history, art, culture, and politics for numerous publications. His current book project, "This Machine Kills Fascists: Technology and Culture in the US Folk Music Revival," revises understandings of the folk revival as an anti-modernist movement. As part of the book project, he is developing a multimedia project (website, coffeetable book catalogue, exhibition) about the Berkeley Folk Music Festival (1958-1970). He is also in the early stages of a book on the poet, folklorist, Lincoln biographer, and socialist Carl Sandburg. He is on the steering committee of the Chicago Dance History Project, an oral history and archival digital documentation of dance in the city and its Midwest surroundings, and he serves as the dramaturg for The Seldoms, a contemporary dance company in Chicago. He graduated from Columbia University and received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. He is the co-founder of the Northwestern University Digital Humanities Laboratory, writes about digital topics at Issues in Digital History, and blogs about art, culture, and politics at Culture Rover.

Currently teaching:Introduction to Digital Studies

Bill Savage

Bill Savage (PhD Northwestern) has been teaching in the SPS MALit program for almost two decades. He is a scholar of Chicago literature, history, and culture, and his most recent publication is an annotated edition of George Ade’s The Old-Time Saloon: Not Wet, Not Dry—Just History (1931; University of Chicago Press, 2016). He also co-edited and annotated Chicago by Day and Night: The Pleasure Seeker’s Guide to the Paris of America (1892; Northwestern University Press, 2013). His current research focuses on popular culture and dynamics of urban space, especially focused on vernacular architectural matters like the design of hot dog stands and saloons. He writes book reviews and op-ed essays regularly for local media, and performs frequently in various live lit venues, including The Paper Machete. He is a lifelong resident of Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood.

Currently teaching:Chicago Transformed: Actual and Textual Cities