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Comparative and World Literature

Deepen your knowledge of the history of literary and narrative forms across a broad range of national literatures, cultures and historical periods, as well as exploring the complex relationship of literary works to politics, philosophy and the visual arts.

Literature

Faculty

John Alba Cutler

John Alba Cutler, an associate professor of English and Latina/o Studies, specializes in US Latino literatures, multiethnic American poetry, contemporary American literature, and print culture studies. His book Ends of Assimilation: The Formation of Chicano Literature, published by Oxford University Press, examines how Chicano/a (Mexican American) literary works represent processes of assimilation, and what those representations can teach us about race, gender, and the nature of literary discourse. Professor Cutler has published articles in American Literary History, American Literature, MELUS, and Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies. He is a member of the Executive Committee for the Latina/o Literature and Culture Forum of the Modern Language Association, and also co-directs the Newberry Library Seminar in Borderlands and Latino Studies. He received the Weinberg College Distinguished Teaching Award in 2013.

Currently teaching:Special Topics: The US-Mexico Border in Literature and Film

Kate Baldwin

Kate Baldwin is a 20th-century Americanist who specializes in comparative theories of gender, race, and ethnicity. Her work focuses on intersections between the mappings of identity and social history in a global context. Her first book, Beyond the Color Line and the Iron Curtain: Reading Encounters between Black and Red, 1922-63, remaps black American modernism by addressing the involvement of African American intellectuals with Soviet communism and a Russian intellectual heritage. Baldwin's past fellowships include a Pembroke at Brown University, a Mellon postdoc at Johns Hopkins University, and a Bunting Fellowship at Harvard University. She has published articles in Cultural Critique, Diaspora, Modern Fiction Studies, Novel, and differences and is working on a book titled Authenticating Nations: Cultural Fictions of Soviet and American Women during the Cold War as well as a translation into English of the 1925 Russian text based on Claude McKay's lost English manuscript of Sudom Lincha/Trial by Lynching. Her essay "The Recurring Condition of Nella Larsen's Passing " will appear in the Norton Critical Edition of Nella Larsen's Passing in 2007.

Currently teaching:Bad Mothers: Ideologies of Female Failure in Twentieth Century Literature, Media, and Film

George Bond

George Bond is a professor of religious studies at Northwestern and a specialist in Buddhist studies and the history of religions. His teaching focuses on Buddhism, Hinduism and the history of religions generally. His research deals primarily with Theravada Buddhism, studying the religion and its texts as well as the lived practice of Buddhism in Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia. He has been a recipient of Northwestern’s Charles Deering McCormick Professorship of Teaching Excellence, the Northwestern Alumni Association’s Award for Excellence in Teaching and the Weinberg College Outstanding Teaching Award. He is the author of numerous articles and books, including The Buddhist Revival in Sri Lanka, Buddhism at Work: the Sarvodaya Movement in Sri Lanka, The Word of the Buddha, and Sainthood: Its Manifestations in World Religions, which he coauthored and edited with Richard Kieckhefer.

Currently teaching:Seminar in Liberal Studies II: Asian Religions in Literature and Film

Scott Durham

Scott Durham, associate professor of French, is the faculty director for the MALit program and chair of the French and Italian department at Northwestern. He has taught both graduate and undergraduate courses in French and comparative literature since 1994, with a primary focus on 20th-century literature, film and the relationship between literature and philosophy. His scholarly publications since he completed his doctorate at Yale include Phantom Communities: The Simulacrum and the Limits of Postmodernism (Stanford University Press), Jean Genet: In the Language of the Enemy (a special number he edited for Yale French Studies) and numerous articles. He is completing work on a book with the working title The Archive and the Monad: Deleuze and the Resistance to Postmodernism.Durham earned his Phd from Yale University.

Currently teaching:Special Topics in Literature: Proust