Liberal Studies

Faculty

John Alba Cutler

John Alba Cutler, an associate professor of English and Latina/o Studies, specializes in US Latino literatures, multiethnic American poetry, contemporary American literature, and print culture studies. His book Ends of Assimilation: The Formation of Chicano Literature, published by Oxford University Press, examines how Chicano/a (Mexican American) literary works represent processes of assimilation, and what those representations can teach us about race, gender, and the nature of literary discourse. Professor Cutler has published articles in American Literary History, American Literature, MELUS, and Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies. He is a member of the Executive Committee for the Latina/o Literature and Culture Forum of the Modern Language Association, and also co-directs the Newberry Library Seminar in Borderlands and Latino Studies. He received the Weinberg College Distinguished Teaching Award in 2013.

Currently teaching:Special Topics: The US-Mexico Border in Literature and Film

George Bond

George Bond is a professor of religious studies at Northwestern and a specialist in Buddhist studies and the history of religions. His teaching focuses on Buddhism, Hinduism and the history of religions generally. His research deals primarily with Theravada Buddhism, studying the religion and its texts as well as the lived practice of Buddhism in Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia. He has been a recipient of Northwestern’s Charles Deering McCormick Professorship of Teaching Excellence, the Northwestern Alumni Association’s Award for Excellence in Teaching and the Weinberg College Outstanding Teaching Award. He is the author of numerous articles and books, including The Buddhist Revival in Sri Lanka, Buddhism at Work: the Sarvodaya Movement in Sri Lanka, The Word of the Buddha, and Sainthood: Its Manifestations in World Religions, which he coauthored and edited with Richard Kieckhefer.

Currently teaching:Seminar in Liberal Studies II: Asian Religions in Literature and Film

Geraldo Cadava

Geraldo Cadava, an Associate Professor of History and Latina/o Studies, specializes in the histories of Latinas and Latinos in the United States, the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, and Latin American immigration to the United States. His first book, Standing on Common Ground: The Making of a Sunbelt Borderland (Harvard University Press, 2013 & 2016), is about cultural and commercial ties between Arizona and Sonora, Mexico, since World War II. It won the Frederick Jackson Turner prize, awarded annually by the Organization of American Historians to the author of the best first book in any field of American History. He is currently writing a history of Latino Conservatism from the 1960s to the 1990s. His scholarly and popular essays have appeared in the Journal of American History, The New York Times, and The Atlantic, among other publications. As a lifelong learner himself, he is especially interested in working students in Northwestern’s School of Professional Studies.

Currently teaching:From Hamilton to “Hamilton” – American History by Lin Manuel Miranda

Michelle Molina

J. Michelle Molina (PhD, University of Chicago, 2004) studies the Society of Jesus in the early modern period. She explores Jesuit spirituality in an effort to understand how individuals – both elite and commoner - approached and experienced religious transformation. In particular, she has been interested in examining the impact of the Ignatian Spiritual Exercises – a meditative retreat geared toward self-reform – on early modern global expansion. Molina’s book, To Overcome Oneself: The Jesuit Ethic and the Spirit of Global Expansion is published with University of California Press. Bearing witness to events in her own era, Molina has explained what it might mean that the new pope is a Jesuit. She has observed that it is best to situate this Jesuit pope in relation to the modes of self-formation found in the Ignatian Spiritual Exercises and, importantly, that this Catholic imperative to “know thyself” indicates that Pope Francis is well versed in what has been termed “philosophy as a way of life.” She enjoys teaching classes on colonial Mexican history, early modern globalization, existentialist film, including those of Woody Allen. Molina particularly appreciates the questions and the focus that adult learners bring to class discussions every week.

Currently teaching:Seminar in Liberal Studies: Religion, Existentialism, and Film

Bill Savage

Bill Savage (PhD Northwestern) has been teaching in the SCS MA Lit program for more than 15 years. He is a scholar of Chicago literature and culture, and his most recent publication is the co-edited and annotated edition of Chicago by Day and Night: The Pleasure Seeker’s Guide to the Paris of America (Northwester UP, 2013). He also co-edited the 50th Anniversary Critical Edition of Nelson Algren’s The Man with the Golden Arm and the Annotated edition of Algren’s Chicago: City on the Make. He writes regularly for local publications, and is a lifelong resident of Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood.

Currently teaching:Chicago Transformed: Actual and Textual Cities