Literature

Faculty

John Alba Cutler

John Alba Cutler, an associate professor of English and Latina/o Studies, specializes in US Latino literatures, multiethnic American poetry, contemporary American literature, and print culture studies. His book Ends of Assimilation: The Formation of Chicano Literature, published by Oxford University Press, examines how Chicano/a (Mexican American) literary works represent processes of assimilation, and what those representations can teach us about race, gender, and the nature of literary discourse. Professor Cutler has published articles in American Literary History, American Literature, MELUS, and Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies. He is a member of the Executive Committee for the Latina/o Literature and Culture Forum of the Modern Language Association, and also co-directs the Newberry Library Seminar in Borderlands and Latino Studies. He received the Weinberg College Distinguished Teaching Award in 2013.

Currently teaching:Special Topics: The US-Mexico Border in Literature and Film

Kate Baldwin

Kate Baldwin is a 20th-century Americanist who specializes in comparative theories of gender, race, and ethnicity. Her work focuses on intersections between the mappings of identity and social history in a global context. Her first book, Beyond the Color Line and the Iron Curtain: Reading Encounters between Black and Red, 1922-63, remaps black American modernism by addressing the involvement of African American intellectuals with Soviet communism and a Russian intellectual heritage. Baldwin's past fellowships include a Pembroke at Brown University, a Mellon postdoc at Johns Hopkins University, and a Bunting Fellowship at Harvard University. She has published articles in Cultural Critique, Diaspora, Modern Fiction Studies, Novel, and differences and is working on a book titled Authenticating Nations: Cultural Fictions of Soviet and American Women during the Cold War as well as a translation into English of the 1925 Russian text based on Claude McKay's lost English manuscript of Sudom Lincha/Trial by Lynching. Her essay "The Recurring Condition of Nella Larsen's Passing " will appear in the Norton Critical Edition of Nella Larsen's Passing in 2007.

Currently teaching:Bad Mothers: Ideologies of Female Failure in Twentieth Century Literature, Media, and Film

George Bond

George Bond is a professor of religious studies at Northwestern and a specialist in Buddhist studies and the history of religions. His teaching focuses on Buddhism, Hinduism and the history of religions generally. His research deals primarily with Theravada Buddhism, studying the religion and its texts as well as the lived practice of Buddhism in Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia. He has been a recipient of Northwestern’s Charles Deering McCormick Professorship of Teaching Excellence, the Northwestern Alumni Association’s Award for Excellence in Teaching and the Weinberg College Outstanding Teaching Award. He is the author of numerous articles and books, including The Buddhist Revival in Sri Lanka, Buddhism at Work: the Sarvodaya Movement in Sri Lanka, The Word of the Buddha, and Sainthood: Its Manifestations in World Religions, which he coauthored and edited with Richard Kieckhefer.

Currently teaching:Seminar in Liberal Studies II: Asian Religions in Literature and Film

Daniel Born

Daniel Born, author of The Birth of Liberal Guilt in the English Novel: Charles Dickens to H. G. Wells, has edited numerous anthologies including The Seven Deadly Sins Sampler, and his articles and essays have appeared in academic journals and mainstream publications including Conradiana, Literature and Theology, the New York Times, and forbes.com. Born received his PhD in English literature in 1990 from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, where he studied with Irving Howe and Alfred Kazin. He was an associate professor at Marietta College where he earned the McCoy Award for Teaching Excellence twice, and later served as chief of staff and vice president at the Great Books Foundation. 

Currently teaching:Introduction to Graduate Study

Scott Durham

Scott Durham, associate professor of French, is the faculty director for the MALit program and chair of the French and Italian department at Northwestern. He has taught both graduate and undergraduate courses in French and comparative literature since 1994, with a primary focus on 20th-century literature, film and the relationship between literature and philosophy. His scholarly publications since he completed his doctorate at Yale include Phantom Communities: The Simulacrum and the Limits of Postmodernism (Stanford University Press), Jean Genet: In the Language of the Enemy (a special number he edited for Yale French Studies) and numerous articles. He is completing work on a book with the working title The Archive and the Monad: Deleuze and the Resistance to Postmodernism.Durham earned his Phd from Yale University.

Currently teaching:Special Topics in Literature: Proust

Brian Edwards

Brian T. Edwards is Crown Professor in Middle East Studies and Professor of English, Comparative Literary Studies, and American Studies at Northwestern, where he also is director of the Program in Middle East and North African Studies. He is the author of Morocco Bound: Disorienting America's Maghreb, from Casablanca to the Marrakech Express (Duke U Press, 2005), and After the American Century: The Ends of U.S. Culture in the Middle East (Columbia U Press, 2016), as well as numerous essays and articles in publications including Salon, The Believer, McSweeney's, Public Culture, Chronicle of Higher Education, Michigan Quarterly Review, Foreign Policy, Bookforum, and leading scholarly journals. Edwards is co-editor of Globalizing American Studies (U of Chicago Press, 2010), a collection of essays that provides global perspectives on US history and culture, and editor of On the Ground: New Directions in Middle East and North African Studies (NU-Q 2013, and available online here). Educated at Yale University (B.A., M.A., Ph.D.), Edwards has lectured extensively in the US and abroad, including in Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt, Lebanon, Iran, Turkey, Qatar, Kyrgyzstan, and India, and has been visiting faculty at University of Tehran, EHESS in Paris, and UC Dublin, as well as a Fulbright Senior Specialist at Cairo University and the University of Naples, Italy. He has taught in the MA Lit and MALS program for several years and particularly enjoys working with adult learners.

 

 

Currently teaching:Introduction to Graduate Studies in Literary and Cultural Analysis

Kasey Evans

Kasey Evans, assistant professor of English at Northwestern, teaches and writes about medieval and Renaissance literature. She is currently completing her book Colonial Temperance: The Strategy of Virtue in Early Modern England, which argues that the virtue of temperance underwent a semantic sea-change during the English Renaissance, evolving from a paradigm of self-discipline and moderation into a value of time-management, efficiency, and colonial aggression. Areas of particular interest include English Renaissance adaptations of Italian poetry (Dante, Ariosto, Tasso); ideologies of race, gender, and sexuality as they shape Renaissance English literature; and literary and critical theory, from medieval exegetes through postmodern philosophers. Evans received her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.

Currently teaching:The Seven Deadly Sins: Behaving Badly in Renaissance Thought, Art, and Literature
Topics: Conceptions of the Body in Midieval Literature

Michelle Molina

J. Michelle Molina (PhD, University of Chicago, 2004) studies the Society of Jesus in the early modern period. She explores Jesuit spirituality in an effort to understand how individuals – both elite and commoner - approached and experienced religious transformation. In particular, she has been interested in examining the impact of the Ignatian Spiritual Exercises – a meditative retreat geared toward self-reform – on early modern global expansion. Molina’s book, To Overcome Oneself: The Jesuit Ethic and the Spirit of Global Expansion is published with University of California Press. Bearing witness to events in her own era, Molina has explained what it might mean that the new pope is a Jesuit. She has observed that it is best to situate this Jesuit pope in relation to the modes of self-formation found in the Ignatian Spiritual Exercises and, importantly, that this Catholic imperative to “know thyself” indicates that Pope Francis is well versed in what has been termed “philosophy as a way of life.” She enjoys teaching classes on colonial Mexican history, early modern globalization, existentialist film, including those of Woody Allen. Molina particularly appreciates the questions and the focus that adult learners bring to class discussions every week.

Currently teaching:Seminar in Liberal Studies: Religion, Existentialism, and Film

Bill Savage

Bill Savage (PhD Northwestern) has been teaching in the SCS MA Lit program for more than 15 years. He is a scholar of Chicago literature and culture, and his most recent publication is the co-edited and annotated edition of Chicago by Day and Night: The Pleasure Seeker’s Guide to the Paris of America (Northwester UP, 2013). He also co-edited the 50th Anniversary Critical Edition of Nelson Algren’s The Man with the Golden Arm and the Annotated edition of Algren’s Chicago: City on the Make. He writes regularly for local publications, and is a lifelong resident of Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood.

Currently teaching:Chicago Transformed: Actual and Textual Cities