Summer program logo

Northwestern University

Get ready. Get set. Go!

Experience college life at Northwestern University this summer in the College Preparation Program.

image description
College Preparation Program

Courses for Credit

One of the best ways to prepare for college is to get a taste of college life and academics. Take this opportunity to explore different subjects or get a head start on the major of your dreams. The College Prep Program offers undergraduate courses for college credit taught by Northwestern faculty and instructors who assume the same level of commitment and involvement from you that they do from college students. The expectations are high, the rewards are long-lasting.

We will be updating the College Prep Program website for Summer 2015 throughout the fall. Please join our mailing list to receive email updates and a program brochure when it becomes availableRequest a brochure

College Credit Courses


More than 300 Northwestern courses in virtually every academic discipline are open to you...

  • Immerse yourself in Arabic, Chinese, or Italian – and learn what filmmaker Federico Fellini meant when he said that “a different language is a different vision of life.”
  • Find yourself discussing the science of climate change, analyzing the psychology of personality or researching the principles of genetics and evolution.
  • Explore a future major in chemistry or history or experiment with something you may not have tried before, like political science or philosophy.
  • Courses are flexibly scheduled, ranging from three-week intensive courses in the sciences or languages, and four to eight weeks for most other offerings. You must receive permission from the Summer Session director to enroll in three-week intensive science courses. Also, students may be able to enroll in upper-level courses, subject to prerequisites and permission.


As a College Prep student in the credit study option, you will take undergraduate courses with students from Northwestern and other universities. The course credit you earn can be transferred to undergraduate programs at many other universities. Your grades will be available on an official Northwestern transcript — a strong beginning to your academic career.

Course list is subject to change without notice.




Summer Session Courses - College Prep Courses

African Studies
AFST 276-0 African Literature in Translation: From Oral Tradition to Contemporary Film Studies

The course offers a comparative study of African arts media--oral performance, writing, electronic recording--and of different arts performance genres within African oral traditions--which have an unbroken connection to contemporary writing and publishing, as well as radio, TV, and film production on the Continent. Theoretical-analytical approaches to the appreciation of verbal arts and film forms are based on the writings of Prof. Harold Scheub of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Creative works explored in the course range from Yoruba divination poetry to stories from the Arabian Nights to epic traditions like that of the West African Mandekan hero Sunjata Keita; there will also be screenings of and work on four feature-length films. Texts for study are offered in English translation, and the films with African-language sound tracks are subtitled. Course resources will be accessible, and work will be submitted, through a (web-based) Learning Management System (LMS)--either Blackboard or Canvas, to be determined. Besides composing and submitting short essays and medium-length midterm (folktale analysis) and final (epic analysis) research "papers," there will be two projects that involve presenting research using the course's LMS site's blog and wiki platforms respectively. Successful completion of the course satisfies one of the Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences' distribution (general education) requirements in the Literature and Fine Arts; and can be counted as a core elective in the African Studies major and minor, and a non-Western literature required course within the Comparative Literary Studies major. The course may also be of interest to students in the fields of Performance Studies and Digital Humanities research.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Harris Hall L04
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41856
Anthropology
ANTHRO 213-0 Human Origins

This course will examine the evolution of the human species and explore the nature of human biological variation in the modern world. Principles of evolutionary theory and genetics will first be presented to provide a framework for the study of human evolutionary biology. The fossil evidence for human evolution will then be considered using comparative data from nonhuman primate ecology to help reconstruct prehistoric lifeways. Finally, the influence of environmental stressors (e.g., climate, nutrition, and disease) on modern human biological variation will be discussed. Particular attention will be given to how human populations have utilized biological and behavioral mechanisms to adapt to their environments throughout evolutionary history. This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 2 – 4:30 p.m. 1810 Hinman 104
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40148
ANTHRO 214-0 Archaeology: Unearthing History

Archaeology is a discipline that requires both physical and intellectual work. Archaeology is partly the discovery and excavation of houses, monuments, treasures, burials - material aspects of past human experience - as well as meticulous scientific analyses to learn about material culture that people left behind. Archaeologists need to exercise creative imagination to paste together the multitude of fragments of the past to get a better understanding of human history.


During the course we will explore a wide range of questions, theories and methods that are in the forefront of archaeological research. We will use examples from around the world: state formation and colonization in Peru, everyday life and warfare among the Maya, monumental architecture at Copan, salt production and imperial expansion of the Aztecs, ritual practice and burial mounds at Cahokia, emancipation and ceramic production in the Caribbean, chiefs in Bronze Age Denmark, castles of medieval England, forts and cremations in Bronze Age Hungary. These case studies, covering the range of interests and expertise of archaeologists in the NU Department of Anthropology, will illustrate how we study societies.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 4 – 6:30 p.m. 1810 Hinman 104
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41862
Art
ART 150-0 Introduction to Photography

This course is an introduction to photographic equipment, materials, and processes that includes extensive darkroom instruction in black-and-white printing and creative darkroom control. The aesthetics of camera vision are explored through classroom discussion and lectures. This is an intensive workshop-style class consisting of two six-hour sessions each week with 30-minute lunch breaks. Attendance at the first class meeting is required, and students must come equipped with a 35mm film camera that can be operated with all automatic settings off. Bring one roll of Kodak TriX film to the first class. No previous studio experience required. Enrollment is limited to 12. Students must bring a 35mm camera that can be operated manually and a roll of Tri-x 400 b&w, 36 exp. film to first class.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 07/16/14 MW 9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. Kresge Hall 3425
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40082
Astronomy
ASTRON 101-0 Modern Cosmology

The modern Big Bang perspective on the origin, structure, evolution, and fate of the universe. Topics to be discussed include the extragalactic distance scale, the Hubble expansion, the large-scale clustering of galaxies, cosmic inflation and the early universe, Big Bang nucleosynthesis, the cosmic microwave background radiation, dark matter, dark energy, and the recent evidence for acceleration in the expansion of the universe. This course counts toward the Weinberg College Natural Sciences distribution requirement, Area I. This distribution course is designed for nonscience majors.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 9 – 11 a.m. Tech. Institute M164
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40149
ASTRON 120-0 Highlights of Astronomy

This course will explore our modern ideas about the solar system, stars, galaxies, and the universe. Topics to be discussed include extrasolar planets, supernovae, black holes, dark matter, the big bang theory and the search for life in the universe.

Learning Objectives:

Correlate understanding of basic physical principles to astrophysical applications in order to explain how we know what we know about the universe

Explain the development of fundamental theories such as the Nebular Hypothesis of solar system formation and the Big Bang theory of the universe\'s origin and evolution.

Analyze levels of certainty in the fundamental theories (Nebular Hypothesis, Big Bang theory, etc.) compared to alternative ideas.

Apply fundamental concepts in astronomy to current research results.

Analyze a scientific theory to determine whether it is a good theory.

 

Natural Sciences Distro Area


Additional Information:

Teaching Method: Three lectures per week. Observing sessions with the Dearborn telescope

Evaluation Method:

Final exam- 25%
Mid-term- 25%
Online work- 10%
Quizzes- 20%
Writing assignments- 20%

 

Class Materials (Required):  Universe, 10th Edition: Freedman & Kauffman, ISBN: 9781464124921.

Class Notes:

This class is intended for non-science majors and no previous background in physics or astronomy is needed. Although equations are introduced in class, no mathematical problem solving is required. We will cover foundational principles of gravity, light and motion that are needed to understand astronomy phenomena and astronomical theories.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 1 – 3:30 p.m. Tech. Institute M164
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40243
Biological Sciences
BIOL_SCI 165-CN Introduction Human Physiology

Functions and interrelationships of organ systems of the human body. Cells, organs, and body systems; deviations from normal functions; the diseased state. May not be taken for credit while or after taking any part of BIOL SCI 210-A, B, or C. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/12/14 Tu 6 – 9:15 p.m. Tech Institute M177
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40990
BIOL_SCI 170-CN Concepts of Biology

Fundamentals of biology. Chemical composition and organization of living material, cellular organization, energy conversion by organisms, genetics and reproduction, ecology, evolution, and other topics. Student-designed project work. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/12/14 Tu 6 – 9:15 p.m. Wieboldt Hall 413
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 40971
BIOL_SCI 202-0 Human Evolutionary Biology

How are humans similar to and distinct from other organisms? This course examines human biological adaptations across a range of bodily systems from an evolutionary perspective. Areas of human biology emphasized will be the brain and special senses; skin structure and function; digestion, diet and the excretory system; respiration and circulation; reproduction, sexual dimorphism and sexual selection; cranial and postcranial musculoskeletal structure; and growth and life history adaptations. The evolutionary context involves brief consideration of processes and patterns of evolution, the origins of human biological systems, and discussion of human population genetics and history, including an understanding of biological variation. The goal of the course is to develop a broad understanding of human biology in an evolutionary context. Prerequisite: BIOL SCI 103-0 or 164-0, or equivalent basic familiarity with biology and evolution, or permission of instructor.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6 – 9 p.m. Tech Institute M128
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40240
BIOL_SCI 216-0 Cell Biology

 

Mechanisms that cells use to compartmentalize and transport cellular materials, to move, to regulate growth and death, to communicate and to respond to their environments.

Prerequisite: CHEM 103 or 172

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.


Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 8 – 10:30 a.m. Tech Institute LR4
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41864
Business Institutions
BUS_INST 239-0 Marketing Management

This course offers students an introduction to basic principles and applications of marketing management. In addition to being guided through the marketing process, students will develop analytical and business skills in preparation for future employment. Market research, consumer behavior, market segmentation, target marketing, brand positioning, distribution channels and service marketing are among the topics discussed. Regular quizzes ensure that students keep up on the reading and remember the core concepts, while a group project gives students the opportunity to apply these concepts to an existing business problem.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. Tech Institute M128
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40226
Chemistry
CHEM 101-0 General Chemistry

The first in a three-course sequence in college-level chemistry for science majors, serving as preparation for more advanced chemistry courses such as organic chemistry and physical chemistry and as the general chemistry preparation required for professional schools. Because of the intensive nature of these courses, it is recommended that students not register concurrently for other courses. Descriptive chemistry, elements, and compounds; basic chemical calculations, stoichiometry, and solution concentration; gas laws.


Chemistry 101-0 students MUST also enroll in the laboratory class (CHEM 121-0.) on Monday/Wednesday, 1-5pm. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an additional lab fee of $250.


Prerequisite: one year of high school chemistry and algebra or consent of instructor.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I. Due to limited space in chemistry courses during Summer Session, priority is given to visiting, degree-seeking, and certificate (Professional Health Careers) students. SCS students-at-large may register starting on June 10 if space is available.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF
Lab: M/W
9 a.m. – noon
1-5:00pm
Tech Institute LR3
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40001
CHEM 102-0 General Inorganic Chemistry

The second in a three-course sequence in college-level chemistry for science majors, serving as preparation for more advanced chemistry courses such as organic chemistry and physical chemistry and as the general chemistry preparation required for professional schools. Because of the intensive nature of these courses, it is recommended that students not register concurrently for other courses. Thermochemistry; descriptive chemistry; inorganic reactions; chemical bonding; condensed phases; phase equilibria, solutions, and colligative properties. 

 

Chemistry 102-0 students MUST also enroll in the laboratory class (CHEM 122-0.) on Monday/Wednesday, 1-5pm. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an additional lab fee of $250.


Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry 101-0 or course deemed equivalent by department/instructor with a grade of C- or better.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I. Due to limited space in chemistry courses during Summer Session, priority is given to visiting, degree-seeking, and certificate (Professional Health Careers) students. SCS students-at-large may register starting on June 10 if space is available.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF
Lab: M/W
9 a.m. – noon
1-5:00pm
Tech Institute LR3
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40002
CHEM 103-0 General Physical Chemistry

The third in a three-course sequence in college-level chemistry for science majors, serving as preparation for more advanced chemistry courses such as organic chemistry and physical chemistry and as the general chemistry preparation required for professional schools. Because of the intensive nature of these courses, it is recommended that students not register concurrently for other courses. Chemical equilibria; equilibria in aqueous solution, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, metal complexes, and solid-state chemistry.

 

Chemistry 103-0 students MUST also enroll in the laboratory class (CHEM 123-0.) on Monday/Wednesday, 1-5pm.  The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an additional lab fee of $250.


Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry 102-0 or course deemed equivalent by department/instructor with a grade of C- or better.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement. Due to limited space in chemistry courses during Summer Session, priority is given to visiting, degree-seeking, and certificate (Professional Health Careers) students. SCS students-at-large may register starting on June 10 if space is available.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF
Lab: M/W
9 a.m. – noon
1-5:00pm
Tech Institute LR3
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40003
CHEM 121-0 General Chemistry Lab

General Chemistry Lab. Students enrolled in Chem 101-0 must also register for Lab 121-0 section 33. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an additional lab fee of $250.

Summer 2014 Sec #33
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MW 1 – 5 p.m. Tech Institute
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40365
CHEM 122-0 General Inorganic Chemistry Lab

General Inorganic Chemistry Lab. Students enrolled in Chem 102-0 must also register for Lab 122-0 section 33. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an additional lab fee of $250.

Summer 2014 Sec #33
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MW 1 – 5 p.m. Tech Institute
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40366
CHEM 123-0 General Physical Chemistry Lab

General Physical Chemistry Lab. Students enrolled in Chem 103-0 must also register for Lab 123-0 section 33. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an additional lab fee of $250.

Summer 2014 Sec #33
08/05/14 - 08/21/14 MW 1 – 5 p.m. Tech Institute
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40367
Chinese

Introduction to the Summer Course

This three-course sequence (111-1, 2, 3) presents the material of the first year of the beginning Chinese curriculum in an intensive format over nine weeks, introducing the Pinyin system, grammar, and about 500-600 characters. The 150-minute-class meets 5 times per week, and provides a practical learner-centered curriculum, with the aim to help true beginners develop their communicative competence in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, while gaining competence in Chinese culture, making connections to their daily life, and building links among communities.

Students who successfully complete Summer Elementary Chinese 111-3 with the final course grade of C- or above may continue with the second-year Chinese (CHINESE 121-1) at Northwestern University.

CHINESE 111-1 Elementary Chinese

The first course in the Elementary Chinese sequence introduces the standard Chinese phonetics system-Pinyin, the Chinese writing system, basic grammar, and simple sentence structures. Speaking, listening, character, grammar, and communicative exercises are included throughout the course.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF noon – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Cancelled Caesar ID: 40231
CHINESE 111-2 Elementary Chinese

The second course in the Elementary Chinese sequence focuses on developing basic communicative skills and knowledge of the Chinese culture. There will be extensive student-oriented practice in pronunciation, conversations, listening comprehension, and sentence structures in class.

Prerequisite: Chinese 111-1 with a grade of C- or above.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF noon – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Cancelled Caesar ID: 40232
CHINESE 111-3 Elementary Chinese

Chinese 111-3 is the third section of the summer class. It aims to help students obtain an adequate grasp of basic language skills in both spoken and written Chinese and lay a good foundation for further study of this language. Speaking, listening, character, grammar, and communicative exercises are included throughout the course.

Prerequisite: Chinese 111-2 with a grade of C- or above.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF noon – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Cancelled Caesar ID: 40233
Information Systems
CIS 212-CN Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming

This course focuses on developing complex programs using an object-oriented language. Students write programs that utilize functions and methods for code modularization and arrays for solving problems. Information hiding, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, exception handling, and other principles of object-oriented programming will be introduced. May not be audited or taken P/N. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/11/14 M 6 – 9:15 p.m. Wieboldt Hall 517
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41123
Classics
CLASSICS 260-0 Classical Mythology: Greek Mythology

The ancient Greeks understood their myths as traditional tales about the origins of the world, the gods, human society, and institutions as well as about the relationship between gods and mortals. Some myths, in particular, constitute an invaluable anthropological basis for investigating the Greeks' attempt to define themselves in opposition to a whole series of "others," including the divine, the feminine, and the foreign. Through a selection of mythological narratives involving gods and goddesses, legendary heroes and heroines, Centaurs, Gorgons, Amazons, exemplars of feminine virtue, and barbarian enchantresses, students examine how the Greeks used the divine/human, male/female, Greek/barbarian dichotomies to shape their notions of "self" and "otherness" and mark the boundaries between what they perceived as "us" and what they categorized as "them." This course counts toward the Weinberg College literature and fine arts distribution requirement, Area VI.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 2:30 – 5 p.m. University Hall 102
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40094
Communication Studies
COMM_ST 205-0 Theories of Persuasion

Survey of major theories that explain how to change another person's attitudes and behaviors. Applications to persuasion within a variety of contexts, including relationships, organizations, legal campaigns, and the mass culture. Fulfills a core requirement of the communication studies department. First class attendance is mandatory.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 1:30 – 4 p.m. Frances Searle 2107
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40841
Music: Performing Organizations
CONDUCT 282-4 Summer Community Chorus

The Summer Chorus will perform Carmina Burana by Carl Off in the version for two pianos and percussion, preceded on the first portion of the concert by the first movement of Bernstein’s Chichester Psalms, and selected short choral works.

If you are interested in singing in the Summer Chorus, contact Stephen Alltop, Northwestern University Bienen School of Music, 711 Elgin Road, Evanston, IL 60208. Phone 847-491-2299 or email swa440@northwestern.edu.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/31/14 MTh 7 – 9:45 p.m. MAB 109
Evanston Campus Open
Economics
ECON 201-0 Introduction to Macroeconomics

Scarcity and choice; elements of demand and supply; determinants of aggregate output, employment, inflation, growth, and balance of payments. Prerequisites: ability to do algebra and draw graphs. This course counts toward the Weinberg College social and behavioral sciences distribution requirement, Area III.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 1 – 2:50 p.m. University Hall 101
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40008
ECON 202-0 Introduction to Microeconomics

Consumers' and producers' influences on structure of output and prices and distribution of income. Social efficiency in resource allocation. Government impact on allocative efficiency and distributive equity. Prerequisite: ECON 201. This course counts toward the Weinberg College social and behavioral sciences distribution requirement, Area III.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 11 a.m. – 12:50 p.m. University Hall 101
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40009
ECON 281-0 Introduction to Applied Econometrics

Estimation and analysis of a variety of empirical econometric models. Descriptive statistics, univariate regression, multiple regression, simultaneous equations, and forecasting. Prerequisite: ECON 201, 202; MATH 220; STAT 210; or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 9 – 10:50 a.m. Jacobs 3245
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40010
English
Composition courses ENGLISH 110 and ENGLISH 111 are only open to School of Continuing Studies students and visiting students. Please see English Requirements for information about prerequisites and placement exam procedures for these courses.
ENGLISH 105-0 Expository Writing

Expository Writing is designed for any student who wants a strong introductory course in college-level writing. Students write three essays, developing each through a process of planning, drafting, revising, and editing. Through this process, students learn techniques for writing essays that are clear, concise, interesting, and well-supported. Class meetings are conducted as seminar discussions and workshops.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 1 – 3:30 p.m. Library 3322
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40305
ENGLISH 111-CN Writing Seminar II: Living Digital

Nearly every aspect of our daily lives is shaped by digital technologies that didn't exist 20 years ago. That's not news, but change has been so rapid that we've barely had time to ask what kind of world we have created. Are we now safer, smarter, happier, more democratic? Or have we become more ignorant, isolated, indifferent and anxious? And will any of those answers still be true next month? In this course we'll begin by looking at research into how technology has changed us, then students will pursue their own research-based explorations into its effect on how we work, play, buy, think, learn, love, and express ourselves. Prerequisite: ENGLISH 110 or equivalent. SCS students taking English 111-CN should also review the SCS writing requirements. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. University Hall 312
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40972
ENGLISH 113-CN Introduction to Literature

Introduction to the vocabulary, techniques, and pleasures of literature through close study and discussion of poems, plays, short stories, and novels. Short critical papers develop ability to analyze and interpret literature. Prerequisite: ENGLISH 111 or equivalent writing skills highly recommended. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6:30 – 9 p.m. Wieboldt Hall 512
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 40973
ENGLISH 205-0 Intermediate Composition

This course is for students with some college writing experiences who want to write more effectively and develop their ability to critique their own work. Students will write and revise several short essays and one medium-length paper. Readings and class discussions will address how to manage the process of writing in different situations, and how to benefit from other writers' advice. Teaching methods: group discussions, peer-review workshops, and individual conferences. May not be audited or taken P/N.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6:30 – 9 p.m. University Hall 318
Evanston Campus Cancelled Caesar ID: 40306
ENGLISH 205-CN Intermediate Composition: Business Communication

This course is designed for those who have experience with college-level writing but who want to sharpen their writing and communication skills. Students learn to apply measures of excellence in business writing and communication. Assignments relate to business environments, including audience analysis, persuasive writing, verbal and interpersonal communication, and document design, and graphics. Writers gain experience writing in collaborative environments. Students produce multiple drafts and receive feedback from their peers and the instructor. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. Students must have ready access to the Internet. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course. First class attendance is mandatory.

Summer 2014 Sec #25
06/26/14 - 07/24/14 Th 6 – 9 p.m. Kresge Hall 2435
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40989
ENGLISH 208-CN Reading and Writing Creative Nonfiction

This course explores a number of creative nonfiction forms, including personal essay, biography and autobiography, criticism, and creative analysis. Students write several short essays and one long essay, discuss the work of outside authors and fellow students in a workshop format, and participate in discussions and exercises on such matters as style, point of view, and critical thinking. May not be audited or taken P/N. Advanced composition class and strong basic writing skills highly recommended. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 6:30 – 9 p.m. Wieboldt Hall 516
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41046
French
FRENCH 111-1 First-Year French

This course is for students who wish to complete all or part of the first year of college French. Any one of the three courses may be taken separately. The three-course sequence aims to build skills in speaking, understanding, writing, and reading French through study, practice, and class activities. Classes include a variety of activities designed to help students acquire knowledge of basic French vocabulary and structures along with the ability to use what they have learned in situations of communication. Classes are conducted in French except when explanation of grammar or other material may necessitate the use of English.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon University Hall 112
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40012
FRENCH 111-2 First-Year French

See FRENCH 111-1 for course description. Prerequisite: FRENCH 111-1.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon University Hall 112
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40013
FRENCH 111-3 First-Year French

See FRENCH 111-1 for course description. Prerequisite: FRENCH 111-2.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon University Hall 112
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40014
FRENCH 121-1 Second-Year French

For students who wish to complete all or part of the second year of college French. Any one of the three courses in this sequence may be taken separately. Using Le Français Internautique, an interactive online program, students review and practice basic grammar and improve their listening comprehension while exploring contemporary French culture. This first course in the sequence stresses oral communication and requires a minimum of two hours of work per day outside of class in the Multimedia Learning Center computer lab or on a computer with high-speed Internet access and a current browser. Classes are conducted in French. Prerequisite: first-year college French or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 1 – 4 p.m. Harris Hall L04
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40089
FRENCH 121-2 Second-Year French

This second course in the sequence develops writing skills and requires a minimum of two hours of work per day outside of class in the Multimedia Learning Center computer lab or on a computer with high-speed Internet access and a current browser. Classes are conducted in French. Prerequisite: FRENCH 121-1 or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF 1 – 4 p.m. Harris Hall L04
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40090
FRENCH 121-3 Second-Year French

This third course in the sequence focuses on reading (short stories and excerpts from literary texts) and requires a minimum of two hours of work per day outside of class in the Multimedia Learning Center computer lab or on a computer with high-speed Internet access and a current browser. Classes are conducted in French. Prerequisite: FRENCH 121-2 or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF 1 – 4 p.m. Harris Hall L04
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40091
Communication
GEN_CMN 101-0 Interpersonal Communication

Through lecture, discussion and exercises, this course introduces students to key concepts in the study of interpersonal communication. The course is designed to: increase students' awareness and understanding of communication processes; encourage students to think critical about communication theory and practice; provide background for upper-level communication courses. No prerequisites.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6:30 – 9 p.m. Frances Searle 1483
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40879
GEN_CMN 102-0 Public Speaking

This course involves the theory, composition, delivery, and criticism of public speeches. Students learn effective public presentation strategies, to be implemented in four to five class assignments ranging from impromptu speaking to persuasion and argumentation. Students develop critical listening skills by evaluating their own public speaking style as well as the effectiveness of their peers and famous public speakers. The course objective is to build confidence in public speaking in a laboratory setting, to learn the power of public rhetoric in a social and professional forum, and to provide practical experience for those desiring to become better speakers in a variety of public communication environments.

Summer 2014 Sec #102-0
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. Parkes Hall 214
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40848
GEN_CMN 102-0 Public Speaking

This course involves the theory, composition, delivery, and criticism of public speeches. Students learn effective public presentation strategies, to be implemented in four to five class assignments ranging from impromptu speaking to persuasion and argumentation. Students develop critical listening skills by evaluating their own public speaking style as well as the effectiveness of their peers and famous public speakers. The course objective is to build confidence in public speaking in a laboratory setting, to learn the power of public rhetoric in a social and professional forum, and to provide practical experience for those desiring to become better speakers in a variety of public communication environments.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/13/14 MW 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. Parkes Hall 214
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40842
Music: Courses for Nonmajors
GEN_MUS 170-0 Introduction to Music

This course will help students to become informed listeners and critical thinkers with respect to a broad range of musical styles and genres. Students will learn how to approach musical sound and structure, position music within its cultural contexts, and consider a variety of musical practices, aesthetics, and ideologies. Particular goals of the course are to build strong listening skills and to acquire the vocabulary to write about and discuss music effectively. No previous musical experience is required.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 10 – 11:40 a.m. MAB 037
Evanston Campus Open
GEN_MUS 175-0 Selected Topics for Non-Majors: American Musical Theater

This course will explore one of the quintessentially American forms of performance- the Broadway musical. Topics to be considered include the relationship of the genre to American culture and society, the genre as a commercial medium, its principal creators and performers, and its role in the formation of America's national identity, highlighting contemporary perspectives on racial and sexual prejudices, myths and stereotypes. The musicals discussed in class will include Show Boat, Oklahoma!, West Side Story, Company and Rent among others. There are no class prerequisites.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 10 – 11:50 a.m. MAB 43
Evanston Campus Open
GEN_MUS 175-0 Selected Topics: Recording Techniques

This class will look in detail at microphone design and placement techniques, covering stereo miking, close and distant miking of instruments and ensembles, and "source" recording for sound design applications. Students learn how to choose the right microphone for the instrument or voice and how details of mic placement affect the sound quality, often dramatically. The course also covers hardware and effects processing associated with the production process. The material is supplemented by in-class recording and miking demonstrations. Projects consist of students making their own recordings using the techniques covered in class. Music background welcome but not required.

Summer 2014 Sec #21
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 10 – 11:50 a.m. MAB 109
Evanston Campus Cancelled
GEN_MUS 175-0 The Beatles and the Rolling Stones

Beatles or Stones? The debate rages on even today. This course will examine what these great rock and roll bands have in common and how they differ: melodies, chord progressions, instrumentation, lyrics, styles of singing and playing, live performances, production and fashion. We will also discuss A Hard Day’s Night and Gimme Shelter, the high points of these bands’ legacies on film. The course focuses on the decade from 1962-1972 but will also touch on influences such as Chuck Berry and the best of the post-Exile Stones. Assignments will include short papers and in-class presentations. No prior musical knowledge or training is required for this class.

Summer 2014 Sec #22
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh noon – 2:30 p.m. MAB 043
Evanston Campus Open
GEN_MUS 252-0 Harmony

The primary goal of this class is to gain fluency in the vocabulary and elements of common-practice tonal music: its notation, construction, and modes of analysis. While emphasis will be placed on harmonic structure and function, through analysis exercises and ear training, we will also discuss other factors that contribute to our enjoyment and understanding of music, such as rhythm, meter, and melodic construction. Reading fluency in treble and/or bass clef will be assumed as a prerequisite for this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuWF noon – 1:50 p.m. MAB 114
Evanston Campus Cancelled
German
GERMAN 101-1 Beginning German

This is the first course in a three-course foundation sequence in elementary German. The sequence uses a communicative approach to provide students with all four language skills -- speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing -- to ensure that students acquire a basic command of German. Classes are conducted largely in German, except when explanation of grammar or other material may require the use of English. This is an intensive approach, requiring a minimum of two hours of homework preparation per class, but the small class size affords summer students many opportunities to practice their German. Students completing the sequence should be well prepared for any intermediate-level German program. Students may enroll in individual courses (subject to skill level) or the entire sequence.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon Library 3322
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40015
GERMAN 101-2 Beginning German

See GERMAN 101-1 for course description.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon Library 3322
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40016
GERMAN 101-3 Beginning German

See GERMAN 101-1 for course description.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon Library 3322
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40017
History
HISTORY 201-1 European Civilization: High Medieval thru mid-18th C

This course surveys the development and rise of pre-industrial European civilization, and examines Europe’s culture, politics, religion, social life, and relations with neighboring societies. The course will take students from the first Crusade at the end of the 11th century through the Age of Absolutism and the enlightened monarchies of the mid-18th century, and will focus on the changing self-perception of the West over this period. Key topics will include Agricultural Revolution, High Middle Ages, Renaissance, Commercial Revolution, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment.

Reading List:

The West: Encounters and Transformations, combined volume, 4th edition, edited by Brian Levack, Edward Muir, and Meredith Veldman (Pearson, 2013).

This course counts toward the Weinberg College historical studies distribution requirement, Area IV.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 2 – 4:20 p.m. Harris Hall L28
Evanston Campus Cancelled Caesar ID: 40199
HISTORY 201-2 European Civilization: Mid 18th Century to Present

This course surveys the major events in European history from the Industrial Revolution to the establishment of the European Union. We will explore the effects of social, political, and industrial change on European society and attempt to answer the question—how did Europeans become modern? Topics covered include the industrial, French, and Russian Revolutions, nationalism and the rise of European empires, the world wars and their aftermaths, and uniting a divided postwar Europe. We will also think the ways in which new political and social thought, theories about race, changing ideas about gender roles and the organization of the family, and scientific and technological innovations shaped how states were organized, governments worked, and ordinary people lived their lives.


Reading List:

Making of the West Peoples and Cultures: Since 1500, Lynn Hunt et al. ISBN-13: 978-0312554606

The Marriage of Figaro, Pierre de Beaumarchais ISBN-13: 978-0140441338

The Communist Manifesto, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels ISBN-13: 978-0140447576 [Or online]

Passage to India, E. M. Forster ISBN-13: 978-0156711425

Civilization and Its Discontents, Sigmund Freud ISBN-13: 978-0393304510

Goodbye to All That, Robert Graves ISBN-13: 978-0385093309

The Drowned and the Saved, Primo Levi ISBN-13: 978-0679721864



Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/25/14 - 08/13/14 W 3 – 6:20 p.m. Harris Hall L28
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40285
HISTORY 210-1 History of the United States, Pre-Colonial to the Civil War

This course will explore major events in American history from the first encounters between Natives, Europeans, and Africans though the Civil War, using evolving understandings of freedom as an interpretive framework. For many people, early America was a testing ground, marketplace, and battlefield for differing interpretations of liberty. In this course, we will trace the experiences of men and women, sailors and farmers, planters and slaves, Indians and colonists, and how this diverse group of people struggled to decide the meaning and extent of freedom. Was it universal? Bounded by ethnicity, religion, gender, or nation? Where did freedom come from? Did government threaten or protect freedom? We will read primary sources to seek out the voices of both famous and ordinary people as they grappled with these and other questions, and how both their answers and questions changed over time. Ideas about freedom shaped --and were shaped by --transatlantic migrations, religious revivals, wars of empire and independence, political upheavals, and global economic transformations. While exploring these ideas, this course will help students develop their historical thinking and writing abilities.

READING LIST: Eric Foner, Give Me Liberty! (4th ed., available in paperback, volume 1)
Eric Foner, Voices of Freedom, a Documentary History, volume 1.

Gordon Wood, The Radicalism of the American Revolution

Gary Nash, The Unknown American Revolution: The Unruly Birth of Democracy and the Struggle to Create America

Paul E. Johnson, A Shopkeeper’s Millennium: Society and Revivals in Rochester, New York, 1815-1837

Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (Dover Thrift Edition)
Course Packet

 

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 2 – 4:20 p.m. Harris Hall L06
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41895
HISTORY 210-2 History of the United States: Reconstruction to the Present

This course covers major themes in United States history with an emphasis on political, cultural and social movements since 1865. Lectures and discussions will focus on racial tensions stemming from slavery, urbanization, westward and global expansion, immigration, the rise of the welfare state, and America as it emerged as a world power and an economic hegemon. Using race and gender as categories of analysis, students will learn to critically engage with primary

sources in order to question which groups have been included and which have been categorically excluded from the legal and cultural boundaries of American citizenship. Ultimately, students will leave the class with the tools necessary to make broader connections between the issues

READING LIST:

Henretta, James, Rebecca Edwards and Robert Self. America: A Concise History: Volume Two: Since 1865 (Paperback) ISBN 978-0312643294.

Henretta, James and Kevin Fernlund. Documents For America's History: Vol II: Since 1865, (Paperback) ISBN 978-0312648633.

Readings to be Posted on Blackboard

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 2 – 4:20 p.m. Harris Hall L05
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41896
HISTORY 212-2 Introduction to African American History, Emancipation to the Civil Rights Era

This course is a survey of African American history from Emancipation to the modern civil rights era. The course is designed to highlight continuities of resistance to racial oppression from the onset of freedom in the 1860s through the emergence of a second reconstruction in the 1960s. Rather than narrating a linear story of gradually improving race relations, this course reveals that the long Black freedom struggle experienced elusive moments of racial progress amid sustained periods of setback. We will examine how competing visions of freedom led to violence and unrest throughout the period covered, from local struggles to maintain white supremacy following emancipation, through the rise of disenfranchisement and Jim Crow, to the race riots of the early twentieth-century, and up through the official repression of organized Black militants in the 1920s and 1930s. We will explore various competing resistance strategies advocated by a range of Black leaders, including Booker T. Washington’s pragmatic embrace of accommodationism, W.E.B. Du Bois’s assertive call for organized protest, Marcus Garvey’s inspiring enunciation of race pride, and the Popular Front’s expansive vision of political possibilities during the depths of the Great Depression. Concluding with the ambivalent impact of the Cold War on the long freedom struggle, this course ends just as a new generation of African American activists and ordinary people stood poised to face the great challenges of the modern civil rights movement of the 1960s.

 

Readings will be made available on Blackboard.

 

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 2 – 4:20 p.m. University Hall 122
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41897
Italian
ITALIAN 101-1 Elementary Italian

This three-course sequence in elementary Italian covers a full year of the language. At the end of the sequence, students are able to ask and answer simple questions in Italian, write a grammatically correct sentence, and follow the drift of a simple conversation. The emphasis is on person-to-person communication. Students build grammar skills by working on simple situations - greetings, introductions, asking directions - that grow in complexity as the course proceeds. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian and include a wide range of exercises, small-group projects, video, and Internet sites. Students also gain knowledge of fundamental aspects of Italian culture, history, and geography. Weinberg students with some experience in Italian may take an exam to place out of any or all of the first-year sequence. Courses may be taken individually (subject to prerequisites) or in sequence.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon Harris Hall L28
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40174
ITALIAN 101-2 Elementary Italian

See ITALIAN 101-1 for course description. Prerequisite: ITALIAN 101-1.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon Harris Hall L28
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40175
ITALIAN 101-3 Elementary Italian

See ITALIAN 101-1 for course description. Prerequisite: ITALIAN 101-2.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon Harris Hall L28
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40176
Japanese
JAPANESE 111-1 Japanese l

JAPANESE 111-1 is the first quarter of Japanese I (JAPANESE 111-1, 2 and 3), a yearlong course that covers the first half of the elementary Japanese. JAPANESE 111-1 covers speaking, aural comprehension and reading and writing, and introduces the Hiragana and Katakana syllabaries and Kanji characters. Upon the satisfactory completion of this course, students will be able to greet, introduce themselves, discuss their daily routines, and write short letters to teachers and friends. In order to continue to JAPANESE 111-2, which is offered in Winter Quarter, students must pass JAPANESE 111-1 with a grade of C- or above.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF 10 – 11:50 a.m. University Hall 312
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40289
Journalism
Journalism courses are open to all students; however, Northwestern day school students must obtain their dean's approval to enroll in these courses. Journalism laboratory courses JRN WRIT 201-A and JRN WRIT 380 may not be audited.
JRN_WRIT 201-A Journalistic Writing Practice I

The business of journalism is under siege these days-but the skills acquired in journalism courses are as useful as ever. This course, taught by an award-winning teacher at the world famous Medill School of Journalism, provides the framework for clear communication. It emphasizes conciseness in expressing thoughts and facts. Through readings, discussion and numerous writing exercises the student gains confidence and demonstrates marked improvement in written expression, week by week. Specifically, this course intends to: Sharpen word selection and usage; clear up problems with grammar and writing style; clean up sentence structure; make writing appealing for the intended audience and increase writing speed. Whether you intend to write for publication or to write more effectively in the workplace, this course gives you the foundational skills to achieve your communication goals. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. Students must have ready access to the Internet. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #25
06/23/14 - 07/21/14 M 6 – 9 p.m. Wieboldt Hall 415
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41030
Linguistics
LING 270-0 Meaning

People use languages like English to convey information. What makes a language, superficially no more than a bunch of noises or strings, suitable for this purpose, and how does it work? This question is at the center of the study of language meaning. In this course we will consider questions like these: How do the meanings of words like “everyone,” “a,” “hit,” and “saw,” give rise to the similarities and differences between “Everyone saw a hit,” “Everyone hit a saw,” “A saw hit everyone,” etc.? Can we always tell for sure what a given sentence means, and does it mean the same on all occasions? Is meaning something that a language has or something people do with it? What's the place of meaning in the overall theory of language? We will explore a variety of approaches to these questions and discuss their theoretical premises, methodological tools, and empirical strengths and weaknesses.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 2:30 – 5 p.m. Tech Institute M128
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41888
Mathematics
MATH 220-0 Differential Calculus of One-Variable Functions

Elements of differential and integral calculus. Definition of a function; trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, and inverse functions; graphs, limits, continuity, derivative of a function, product, quotient and chain rule, implicit differentiation, linear approximation and differentials, related rates, mean value theorems, curve plotting, optimization problems, Newton's method, and antiderivatives. Taken consecutively, 220 and 224 are equivalent to two-thirds of a year in calculus. Prerequisite: three years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #24
06/23/14 - 07/17/14 MTuWTh 1 – 3 p.m. Lunt Hall 107
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40038
MATH 224-0 Integral Calculus of One-Variable Functions

Elements of differential and integral calculus. Integral calculus in one variable. Definite integrals and the fundamental theorems of calculus. Techniques of integration, including integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitutions, partial fractions, numerical integration, and improper integrals. Applications of integration; computation of volumes, arc length, average value of functions. The mean value theorem for integration, work, and probability. Sequences and series; the integral and comparison tests, power series, ratio test, introduction to Taylor's formula, Taylor series, and using the series to solve differential equations. Taken consecutively, MATH 220 and 224 are equivalent to two-thirds of an academic year in calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 220 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #24
07/21/14 - 08/14/14 MTuWTh 1 – 3 p.m. Lunt Hall 107
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40039
MATH 230-0 Differential Calculus of Multivariable Functions

Vectors, dot and cross products, equations of lines and planes; polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates; differentiation of vector functions; velocity and acceleration, arc length, parametric surfaces, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, tangent plane and linear approximations, chain rule for partial derivatives, directional derivative and gradient, max-min problems for functions of several variables, Lagrange multipliers. Prerequisite: MATH 224-0 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/13/14 MW 3 – 5 p.m. Lunt Hall 107
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40083
MATH 234-0 Multiple Integration and Vector Calculus

Cylindrical and spherical coordinates, double and triple integrals, line and surface integrals. Change of variables in multiple integrals; gradient, divergence, and curl. Theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes. Prerequisite: 230. Students may not receive credit for both 234 and 281-1, 285-3, 290-3, or 291-3. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 3 – 5 p.m. Lunt Hall 105
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40184
MATH 240-0 Linear Algebra

Basic concepts of linear algebra. Solutions of systems of linear equations; vectors and matrices; subspaces, linear independence, and bases; determinants; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; other topics and applications as time permits. Math 230-0 or its equivalent is prerequisite for Math 240-0. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/13/14 MW 10 a.m. – noon Lunt Hall 107
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40150
Marketing
MKTG 201-CN Marketing I: Principles of Marketing

Marketing structure and processes whereby products proceed from the place of production to final use or consumption. Sales management, retailing, foreign trade, advertising, channels of distribution for marketing different types of products, activities of wholesale and retail middlemen and other important marketing institutions, cooperative marketing, market risk, sources of marketing information, price determination, governmental activity related to marketing, cost of marketing, and general critique of market structure. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 07/24/14 TuTh 6 – 9 p.m. University Hall 102
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40975
Philosophy
PHIL 110-0 Introduction to Philosophy

This course seeks to introduce students to philosophy by examining some of its central problems through classical and contemporary texts. Topics to be discussed in the course include the mind-body problem, the nature of good and evil, and free will. Students will acquire the necessary skills to (i) read carefully and critically engage with texts that exhibit different forms of philosophical argumentation; (ii) to develop their own views about the topics to be discussed; (iii) to present and defend their ideas in a clear and forceful way.

 This course counts toward the Weinberg College ethics and values distribution requirement, Area V.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Parkes Hall 213
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40238
PHIL 150-0 Elementary Logic I

Everyone argues. And when we argue--at least when we do so correctly--we offer premises in support of a conclusion. Logic is the study of a peculiar kind of support between premises and conclusions. That peculiar support is called 'implication': premises imply a conclusion whenever the truth of the premises guarantees the truth of the conclusion.

This class introduces students to formal tools for evaluating and constructing arguments in terms of implication. We will learn how to reveal the basic logical features of everyday English sentences, and we will use those features to give a formal account of implication. With that account in hand, we will learn methods for testing whether premises imply conclusions, and for constructing good arguments out of a given set of premises.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 10 a.m. – noon University Hall 218
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40018
PHIL 216-0 Introduction to Pragmatism

Topic: Classics of American Pragmatism

Pragmatism is probably the first, but certainly the most important genuinely Northamerican philosophical tradition. The classical writings of Peirce, James, Dewey, and Mead set the stage for a completely new orientation in epistemology, moral and political theory, psychology and many other fields. Basic to all Pragmatist writers is the belief that the active and interactive human being in its natural and social environment has to stand at the center of reflection, thus emphasizing the volitional, procedural, social, and evolutionary aspects of knowledge of any kind. In the seminar, we will get a general view of pragmatist philosophical literature from Peirce to Putnam, including classics like “The Fixation of Belief” (Peirce), “The Will to Believe” (James), “Reconstruction in Philosophy” (Dewey), “Solidarity and Objectivity” (Rorty).

This course counts toward the Weinberg College Ethics and Values distribution requirement, Area V.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. University Hall 418
Evanston Campus Cancelled Caesar ID: 41880
PHIL 219-0 Introduction to Existentialism: from Kierkegaard to Sartre

Existentialism is distinguished by its emphasis on themes of the human condition usually neglected in the wider field of philosophy. These include alienation, anxiety, dread, authenticity, and responsibility, to name a few. In this course we will study existentialism through four of its key authors, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre. Through a combination of class discussion and writing assignments, we will examine how each of these authors sought to understand human existence in the wake of the realization that moral values are contingent. We will also explore existentialist themes in some contemporary cinema.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College Ethics and Values distribution requirement, Area V.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 9:30 – 11 a.m. Kresge Hall 4430
Evanston Campus Cancelled Caesar ID: 40241
PHIL 269-0 Bioethics

An analysis of the ethical issues that arise as a result of developments in medicine and biotechnology. Topics considered will include cloning and stem cell transplantation, human and animal research, new reproductive technologies, the definition of death, abortion, euthanasia, and the allocation of resources. Course Objective: To develop insight into and appreciation for the way philosophical analysis and argument can contribute to clarifying the ethical issues in complex and controversial topics in biotechnology and medicine.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College Ethics and Values distribution requirement, Area V.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 6 – 8:30 p.m. University Hall 102
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40093
Physics
PHYSICS 130-1 College Physics: Mechanics

Overview of class:  Mechanics. Algebra-based physics primarily for biology majors and premedical students who do not need to take calculus-based physics.

Topics:
Motion in One Dimension
Vectors, Motion in a Plane
Motion in a Plane
Particle Dynamics
Work and Energy
Conservation of Energy
Conservation of Linear Momentum
Collisions
Rotational Kinematics
Rotational Dynamics and Conservation of Angular Momentum
Oscillations
Gravitation
Fluids

Laboratory Excercises:
Kinematics I: Uniform Acceleration. The study of an object sliding down a frictionless incline.
Kinematics II: Acceleration-deceleration. The study of the interrelation between displacement, velocity, and acceleration for an object with changing acceleration.
Newton\'s 2nd Law. Study of the relationship of mass and acceleration
Conservation of Energy. Study of the transformation of energy from one form to another.
Conservation of Momentum. Conservation of momentum and energy is verified for an elastic collision.

Conservation of Momentum in 2-D. Conservation of momentum and energy is verified for an elastic collision in a plane. Rotation of a Rigid Body around a Fixed Axis I. Study of the relationship between torque, force, and moment of inertia.
The Pendulum. The simple pendulum and the physical pendulum are compared.

 

 This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.


Additional Information:

Registration Requirements:  Algebra and trigonometry.

Teaching Method:  Five 2 hour lectures, five discussion, and 2- 3 two-hour laboratories per week. Turning Point Classroom Clickers will be used.

Evaluation Method:  Daily quizzes, one midterm examination, lab grade, and a final examination.

Class Materials (Required):

Physics by Giancoli, 7th ed, publisher- Pearson
1st quarter lab manual by Stipes (available at Norris)
scientific calculator
.pdf viewer (Adobe Acrobat Reader or equivalent)
Laboratory Notebook (Quadrille ruled and permanent binding)
Blackboard Course Management: https://courses.northwestern.edu/webapps/login/

 

Class Materials (Suggested):  Turningpoint clickers

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech Institute L211
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40145
PHYSICS 130-2 College Physics: Electricity and Magnetism

Overview of class:

Algebra-based physics primarily for premedical students who do not need to
take calculus-based physics. Topics covered are similar to those of 135-2.

1. Static electricity
2. Electric fields
3. Electrical potentials
4. D.C. Circuits
5. Capacitors
6. Magnetic fields
7. Inductance
8. Inductors
9. A.C. Circuits

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.


Additional Information:

Registration Requirements:

High-school algebra
Preferred Physics 130-1

Teaching Method:

Daily 2-hour lectures with demonstrations, daily discussion section, two-hour laboratory 3 times per week.

Evaluation Method:

1 midterm, a final exam, daily quizzes, and a lab grade.

Class Materials (Required):

Physics by Giancoli, 7th ed, publisher- Pearson
2nd quarter lab manual by Stipes (available at Norris)
scientific calculator
.pdf viewer (Adobe Acrobat Reader or equivalent)
Laboratory Notebook (Quadrille ruled and permanent binding)
Blackboard Course Management: https://courses.northwestern.edu/webapps/login/

 

Class Materials (Suggested):

 

Turningpoint clickers

 

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech Institute L211
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40144
PHYSICS 130-3 College Physics: Wave Phenomena and Modern Physics

Overview of class:

Wave phenomena, optics, quantum physics and special topics. Credit 1 quarter -course. Algebra-based physics primarily for Biology majors and premedical students who do not need to take calculus-based physics. Prerequisites: algebra and trigonometry.

Topics:

1. Waves in Elastic Medium
2. Sound Waves
3. Electromagnetic Waves
4. The Nature and Propagation of Light
5. Reflection and Refraction - Plane Waves and Plane Surfaces
6. Reflection and Refraction - Spherical Waves and Spherical Surfaces
7. Interference8. Diffraction
9. Gratings and Spectra
10. Polarization
11. Light and Quantum Physics
12. Waves and Particles
13. Special Relativity
14. Nuclear Physics

Laboratory Exercises:

1. Sound - Speed of sound is measured and standing wave patterns observed.
2. Snell\\\'s Law - the law of refraction is verified, and applications in optical fibers studied.
3. Geometric Optics - real and virtual objects and images are studied for convergent and divergent lenses.
4. Double Slit Diffraction - study of the diffraction and interference patterns for various double slits and grating.
5. Single Slit Diffraction - the study of the diffraction and interference patterns for various single slits and round apertures.
6. Intensity Distribution in a Diffraction Pattern - the intensity distribution of a single slit diffraction pattern is observed using a photo sensor array.
7. Intensity of polarized light.
8. Spectral Nature of Light- a grating spectrometer is used to study the light spectra from an incandescent source as well as the line spectra of several gases.

 

 This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.


Additional Information:

Learning Objectives:

We intend to teach the physical models of several natural phenomena at the level that students familiar with algebra and trigonometry can solve some of the simpler problems associated with the phenomena. We will demonstrate detailed strategies for solving these problems, point out how each strategy satisfies the assumptions of the models, and why other strategies might fail to satisfy some of these assumptions.

Teaching Method:

Each lecture will detail the physical phenomenon under consideration and its mathematical model will be presented. Example problems will be presented for these phenomena along with relevant classroom demonstrations. Additional examples are provided in the textbook. During the daily discussion period, the TA will demonstrate solutions to problems, answer questions about subject matter, and proctor a quiz.

Evaluation Method:

Quizzes (best 9 out of 10)=1/5
Midterm: 1/5
Final Exam=2/5
Laboratory=1/5

Class Materials (Required):

Physics by Giancoli, 7th ed, publisher- Pearson
3rd quarter lab manual by Stipes (available at Norris)
scientific calculator
.pdf viewer (Adobe Acrobat Reader or equivalent)
Laboratory Notebook (Quadrille ruled and permanent binding)
Blackboard Course Management: https://courses.northwestern.edu/webapps/login/

 

Class Notes:

Class supporting material will be posted to Blackboard and students are expected to make use of this resource. Lecture slides, solutions to selected homework problems along with exam and quiz keys will be made available.

 

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech Institute L211
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40143
PHYSICS 135-1 General Physics: Mechanics

Particle kinematics, Newtonian dynamics, work and energy, collisions and momentum, torque and angular momentum, rigid-body statics and dynamics, harmonic oscillations, gravitation. Concurrent registration in PHYSICS 136 laboratory is required. Prerequisites: differential and integral calculus. This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.


Additional Information:

Class Materials (Required):

Fundamentals of Physics 10th edition extended by Jearl Walker
Physics Laboratory Manual, 1st Quarter (available at Norris)
scientific calculator
Quality laboratory notebook with permanent binding and Quadrille ruled for recording data in lab.

Class Materials (Suggested):

Fundamentals of Physics 10th edition extended-Student Solutions Manual and Student Study Guide, by Jearl Walker

 

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech Institute L221
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40019
PHYSICS 135-2 General Physics: Electricity and Magnetism

Electrostatics, magnetostatics, DC and AC circuits, time-varying fields, Ampere's Law, Gauss's Law. Concurrent registration in PHYSICS 136 laboratory is required. Prerequisites: differential and integral calculus and PHYSICS 135-1 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.


Additional Information:

Class Materials (Required):

Fundamentals of Physics 10th edition extended by Jearl Walker
Physics Laboratory Manual, 2nd Quarter (available at Norris)
scientific calculator
Quality laboratory notebook with permanent binding and Quadrille ruled for recording data in lab.

Class Materials (Suggested):

Fundamentals of Physics 10th edition extended -Student Solutions Manual and Guide, by Jearl Walker

 

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech Institute L221
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40020
PHYSICS 135-3 General Physics: Wave Phenomena and Modern Physics

Mechanical waves, sound waves, geometric optics, interference and diffraction, the quantum nature of particles and light, atomic and nuclear phenomena. Concurrent registration in PHYSICS 136 laboratory is required. Prerequisites: differential and integral calculus and PHYSICS 135-2 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.


Additional Information:

Class Materials (Required):

Fundamentals of Physics 10th edition extended by Jearl Walker
Physics Laboratory Manual, 3rd Quarter (available at Norris)
scientific calculator
Quality laboratory notebook with permanent binding and Quadrille ruled for recording data in lab.

Class Materials (Suggested):

Fundamentals of Physics 10th edition extended -Student Solutions Manual and Guide, by Jearl Walker

 

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech Institute L221
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40085
PHYSICS 136-1 Physics Laboratory

This is the required physics laboratory for both the PHYSICS 130-1,2,3 and the PHYSICS 135-1,2,3 sequences. This noncredit, no-fee laboratory may not be waived or taken separately. Students must register separately for each course of the laboratory (136-1, 136-2, 136-3) if they are taking more than one course in either physics sequence. The enrollment in each laboratory section is strictly limited to 20 students. Students must not assume that they are able to take a section at a specific time. Part-time work or other commitments must be arranged so that students can be in alternate laboratory sections should their first choice be closed. The eight-week sequence comprises a total of 24 laboratories, 8 for each course. Laboratories meet on a rotating schedule, meaning that they meet on MTWThF, but not every M, not every T, etc. There are an average of three labs per week. At the start of classes, students receive a syllabus showing the exact days on which laboratories meet. The times for each section are as follows and are the same for each session of the sequence:136-1, 2, 3 Sec. 38: 7-9 am; 136-1, 2, 3 Sec. 48: 1-3 pm; 136-1, 2, 3 Sec. 58: 3-5 pm

Summer 2014 Sec #38, 48, 58
06/23/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF Time: TBA Tech Institute
Evanston Campus Open
Political Science
POLI_SCI 240-0 Introduction to International Relations

This course is an introduction to history, concepts, and problems in international politics. Among the questions we will consider are: Where do international order and disorder come from? What are the powers and limits of nation-states? What is ‘globalization’? What power do multinational corporations have? What are the ideas behind UN intervention? Can international law be used to prosecute war criminals?

Much of our attention will be focused on the concepts needed to think about and work in international politics. Concepts such as sovereignty, interests, statehood, and identity are central.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Parkes Hall 215
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40272
Psychology
PSYCH 110-0 Introduction to Psychology

The purpose of this course is to give an overview of the field of psychology. Class lectures, readings, demonstrations, and discussions will combine to give you a sense of the scientific study of psychology across many areas of inquiry. Ultimately, the goal of this course is to provide you with an enhanced evidence-based understanding of the fundamentals of behavior, thought, and human nature. Prerequisite: none. This course counts toward the Weinberg College social and behavioral sciences distribution requirement, Area III.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. Tech. Institute M152
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40027
PSYCH 201-0 Statistical Methods in Psychology

This course is designed to introduce you to statistics, including both descriptive statistics (summarizing data obtained from a sample) and inferential statistics (drawing inferences about a population based on data obtained from a sample drawn from that population). The assigned readings have been selected to familiarize students with basic concepts relating to the analysis and interpretation of data. Class activities will focus on how the concepts can be applied. Through completion of the course, students should become more sophisticated and critical consumers of statistical information. Prerequisite: high school algebra and PSYCH 110 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Frances Searle 3220
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40028
PSYCH 204-0 Social Psychology

This course gives a general overview of the field of social psychology. Through reading and discussion, you will gain a broad sense of current issues in social psychology, as well as deeper insight into specific avenues of study. Emphasis will be placed on an evidence-based approach to the study of how an individual relates to his or her social environment. The course will not be very technical, but you will leave with a sense of how to interpret popular scientific research in social psychology and how to link this research to psychological phenomena in the real world. Prerequisite: PSYCH 110 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College social and behavioral sciences distribution requirement, Area III.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 1 – 3:30 p.m. Frances Searle 3220
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40029
PSYCH 205-0 Research Methods in Psychology

This course provides an introduction to psychological research techniques and methodology. Topics to be covered include the logic of research, the issues that must be considered in deciding how to study various psychological phenomena, and ways to address the difficulties posed by the limitations of specific studies. Ways for assessing threats to the internal and external validity of studies will be examined. These issues will be illustrated through reference to examples of research on various topics in psychology. In addition to lectures and readings, students will participate actively in the design and analysis of several research projects. Students will also learn to write research reports in the style used by research psychologists. Prerequisite: Psych 110 or equivalent and Psych 201 or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Lunt Hall 105
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40084
PSYCH 212-0 Introduction to Neuroscience

The purpose of this course is to provide a broad overview of the current state of neuroscience as a field. Students will gain an understanding of brain functioning from the cellular level to the systems level. Major areas of cognition will be discussed from a neurological perspective in order to explain how brain functioning gives rise to everyday behavior, thinking and decision making. The areas that will be covered include, but are not limited to, brain anatomy, perception, memory, language, thought, consciousness, morality, and brain disorders. Lecture will be the primary teaching tool used, though discussion will also be a significant portion of the class. Grades will be assessed via tests (multiple choice and essay) as well as with writing assignments. Students who are intrigued by how the the brain underpins the impressive diversity of skills and processes that humans demonstrate everyday are strongly encouraged to enroll. At the heart of this course is a curiosity and yearning to understand the biological and scientific basis for the majesty of human experience. This course counts toward the Natural Sciences distribution requirement, Area I.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6 – 8:30 p.m. Wieboldt Hall 507
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 40292
PSYCH 228-0 Cognitive Psychology

How do we perceive, remember, reason, and communicate about our experiences as we go about our lives? This course is an introduction to cognitive psychology, the study of how the mind represents and processes information about the world. The course will cover topics such as perception, attention, memory, knowledge representation, language, reasoning, problem solving, and decision-making. Classes consist of lectures, in-class demonstrations, and discussion. Students learn to think critically about the assumptions and methods underlying research in cognition. Students gain an understanding of scientific debates about how the mind works, read original empirical research papers, and participate in demonstrations of experiments. Prerequisite: PSYCH 110 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Social and Behavioral Sciences distribution requirement, Area III.

Summer 2014 Sec #24
06/23/14 - 07/16/14 MW 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Frances Searle 2370
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40177
Religion
RELIGION 170-0 Religion in Human Experience

This course has three main goals: (1) It will provide an introduction to Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Students should gain a basic “literacy” in each of these traditions; (2) It will encourage students to become comfortable thinking analytically about religion. The course will discuss how various scholars have understood what religion “is,” and explore several lenses through which they analyze it (mythology; ritual, worship and sacred space; prayer and meditation; morality, ethics, and politics; and gender and sexuality); (3) Students will apply their religious literacy, along with their newfound analytic skills to identify similarities, but also differences between and among religious traditions. The course will consist of an in-class midterm and an in-class final.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/18/14 MWF 12:30 – 3 p.m. Library 3370
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40185
RELIGION 210-0 Introduction to Buddhism

This course will be an introduction, suitable for beginners and others, of Buddhism, the philosophy and religion that began in India some 2500 years ago and now exists in almost all parts of the world. Buddhism has shaped the thought and culture of Asia and has also influenced Western thought and culture in significant ways. In this class we will examine some of the forms of this diverse tradition. One emphasis will be on investigating the philosophical and religious teachings of Gautama the Buddha in India as well as the history and thought of later Buddhists in other parts of Asia. We will explore Buddhism’s system of values, its interpretation of existence, and its several systems of meditation and practices that the Buddhists have employed to find meaning in life.
6WKS

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Parkes Hall 215
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40296
RELIGION 230-0 Introduction to Judaism

Course Description: This course attempts to answer the questions "What is Judaism?" and "Who is a Jew?" by surveying the broad arc of Jewish history, reviewing the practices and beliefs that have defined and continue to define Judaism as a religion, sampling the vast treasure of Jewish literatures, and analyzing the unique social conditions that have made the cultural experience of Jewishness so significant. The class will employ a historical structure to trace the evolutions of Jewish literature, religion, and culture through the ages. This course counts toward the Weinberg College ethics and values distribution requirement, Area V.
8WKS

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/13/14 MW 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Library 3370
Evanston Campus Cancelled Caesar ID: 40180
Radio/ Television/ Film
RTVF 260-0 Foundations of Screenwriting

An introduction to screenwriting: Students will develop, revise, and polish a twelve to fifteen page script. As preparation, lectures will include visual storytelling, characterization, dialogue, plot development, suspense, screenplay formatting, and working in Los Angeles. Class discussion will include clips and script excerpts from films such as The Shawshank Redemption, American Beauty, The Bourne Identity, and Little Miss Sunshine; and award-winning shorts as well.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 6:30 – 9 p.m. University Hall 418
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40826
RTVF 298-0 Media Topics: Summer at the Movies

This course introduces students to the basics of film language and provides them with the critical tools to analyze film. Students are expected to attend a weekly movie playing at a local Chicago theater and to write a weekly film critique. Through watching and discussing both classic gems of film history in class and newer works on their own, students gain an understanding of how film technique influences cinematic meaning. Films studied in 2013 included Francis Ha and Man of Steel.

Class Materials (Required)
Looking at Movies by Richard Barsam, 4th edition.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6:30 – 9 p.m. Wieboldt Hall 514
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 40943
RTVF 298-0 Studies in Media Topics: Disney Studies

Despite the Walt Disney Company's massive media presence today, little attention is paid to the rich history which built it, dating all the way back to its origins as Laugh 0 Gram Studios in Kansas City during the 1920s What visible glimpses we have today tend to be shaped by the market Imperatives of corporate re branding and the sentimental simplicity of nostalgic hazes. As such, this course will focus on the many ups and downs over the decades of Disney's slow aesthetic, economic, and cultural growth, providing a foundation for better understanding the company today.

In addition to analyzing particular Disney texts (some well -known and many not well known), special emphasis will be paid to the many facets or the studio's first critical and commercial success in the 1930s, its struggles with bankruptcy throughout the 1940s, and its hugely successful re -branding as a prominent component of a new post-war leisure culture in the 1950s and 1960s. Extensive attention will also be paid to the company's considerable revival and expansion under the "Team Disney" leadership of the 1980s and 1990s, as well as some reflection on the recent investment in once-competing brands such as Pixar, Marvel and Lucas film. This course is designed as a smaller scale class for a limited number of freshmen and sophomores, which thus will require active and informed participation from all students who enroll. For instance, every student will be expected to lead discussion on a designated course reading during an assigned day Students should also note that less attention will be paid to the Disney theme parks which will be more fully explored in a separate course on "vacation" narratives in the spring quarter.

 

 

Summer 2014 Sec #36
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 6:30 – 9 p.m. University Hall 312
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41909
Sociology
SOCIOL 110-0 Introduction to Sociology

Essential characteristics of group life. Interrelations of society, culture, and personality. Basic institutions and processes.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 1 – 3:30 p.m. Parkes Hall 213
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40273
SOCIOL 202-0 Sociol Problems

In this introductory-level undergraduate course, we investigate how social conditions come to be defined as social problems and how lives and identities are shaped when people are connected to a social problem. We learn and use sociological tools to analyze case studies of contemporary social problems including issues of: the “deserving” poor and “undeserving rich,” youth unemployment, obesity, and diversity in higher education. We review media sources—i.e. magazines, news clips, and social media, even watching a film on heroin—and academic readings from Social Problems journal. We will also examine how various interested parties (e.g. media, politicians, lawmakers, academics, advocacy groups) define a similar situation as problematic, but for very different reasons, and in doing so suggest very different solutions. Students also complete ongoing assignments related to a social problem of their choosing; this work comprises a majority of the course grade.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 9:30 a.m. – noon Parkes Hall 213
Evanston Campus Cancelled Caesar ID: 41884
SOCIOL 216-0 Gender and Society

This course introduces students to core themes in the social-scientific analysis of gender. This course examines the creation and reproduction of gender identities, gender ideologies, and gender-based social institutions in American society. A central focus of the course is on the construction of gender and sexuality as meaningful social categories. We will explore the varieties of ways that social scientists have analyzed gender roles and relations, including socialstructural, cultural, and biological perspectives; the intersections of gender, race, and class as social identities; gender and bodies; gender, power, and sexual violence; gender and sexuality; and the economic and political circumstances of family life in contemporary society.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 1 – 3:30 p.m. Parkes Hall 213
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41885
SOCIOL 220-0 Health, Biomedicine Culture and Society

Present-day medicine and health care are flashpoints for a bewildering array of controversies-about whose interests the health care system should serve and how it should be organized; about the trustworthiness of the medical knowledge we rely on when we are confronted with the threat of illness; about the politics and ethics of biomedical research; about whether health care can be made affordable; about how the benefits of good health can be shared equitably across lines of social class, race, and gender; and about the proper roles of health professionals, scientists, patients, activists, and the state in establishing medical, political, and ethical priorities. By providing a broad introduction to the domain of health and biomedicine, this course will take up such controversies as matters of concern to all. We will analyze the cultural meanings associated with health and illness; the political controversies surrounding health care, medical knowledge production, and medical decision-making; and the structure of the social institutions that comprise the health care industry. We will examine many problems with the current state of health and health care in the United States, and we will also consider potential solutions.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 9:30 a.m. – noon Parkes Hall 224
Evanston Campus Open
SOCIOL 226-CN Sociological Analysis

This course explores the logic and methods of social research, qualitative and quantitative analysis of social data, and ethical, political, and policy issues in social research, and provides foundation for further work in social research. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. Students must have ready access to the Internet. This course is open to Leadership and Organization Behavior year two cohort students only. First class attendance is mandatory. LOB students only

Summer 2014 Sec #25
06/28/14 - 07/26/14 Sa 9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Wieboldt Hall 514
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41029
Spanish
SPANISH 101-1 Elementary Spanish

The first course in a three-course sequence based on the communicative method. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary building, listening comprehension, speaking, and gaining grammar skills through context.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon University Hall 121
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40030
SPANISH 101-2 Elementary Spanish

The second course in a three-course sequence based on the communicative method. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary building, listening comprehension, speaking, and gaining grammar skills through context. Prerequisite: SPANISH 101-1 or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon University Hall 121
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40031
SPANISH 101-3 Elementary Spanish

The third course in a three-course sequence based on the communicative method. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary building, listening comprehension, speaking, and gaining grammar skills through context. Prerequisite: SPANISH 101-2 or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon University Hall 121
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40032
SPANISH 121-1 Intermediate Spanish

The first course in the intermediate level three-course sequence. This course emphasizes communication in meaningful contexts and further development of grammar and vocabulary through reading modern Spanish prose, speaking and writing. An audio-visual component further develops listening comprehension. Prerequisite: Spanish 101-3, 115-2, or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF noon – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40033
SPANISH 121-2 Intermediate Spanish

The second course in the intermediate level three-course sequence. This course emphasizes communication in meaningful contexts and further development of grammar and vocabulary through reading modern Spanish prose, speaking and writing. An audio-visual component further develops listening comprehension. Prerequisite: Spanish 121-1 or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF noon – 3 p.m. University Hall 121
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40034
SPANISH 121-3 Intermediate Spanish

The third course in the intermediate level three-course sequence. This course emphasizes communication in meaningful contexts and further development of grammar and vocabulary through reading modern Spanish prose, speaking and writing. An audio-visual component further develops listening comprehension. Prerequisite: Spanish 121-2 or equivalent. Completion of 121-3 with a C- or better fulfills the WCAS language requirement.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF noon – 3 p.m. University Hall 121
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40035
Statistics
STAT 202-CN Introduction to Statistics

Data collection and summarization, random variables, correlation, regression, probability, sampling, estimation, tests of significance, and two-sample comparisons. Does not require calculus and makes minimal use of formal mathematics. Examples taken from newspapers and other real-world sources. Familiarity with Microsoft Excel is recommended. The computer is used as a tool to enhance students' ability to analyze and interpret data collected. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. Students must have ready access to the Internet. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #25
06/26/14 - 07/24/14 Th 6 – 9 p.m. University Hall 122
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41014
STAT 210-0 Introduction to Statistics for The Social Sciences

This introduction to statistics covers elementary probability theory, descriptive statistics, sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing--all frequently used in many social science, physical science, and engineering disciplines. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 07/18/14 MWF 10 a.m. – noon Frances Searle 2378
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40197
Theatre
THEATRE 242-0 Stage Makeup

In this lecture, demonstration, and application course, students learn the principles of makeup design and execution for the stage. Students are not required to have any prior makeup training or knowledge, only a willingness to learn. This class has a course fee of $10. This course will meet in Barber Theatre Makeup Room. Enrollment limited to 14.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 11:30 a.m. – 1:50 p.m. TIC Barber Makeup
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40849