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Summer Session 2016 Courses





Summer Session Courses

Accounting
ACCOUNT 201-DL Introduction to Financial Accounting

The content of the course is designed to provide students with a firm understanding of the financial accounting process, and to include identifying, recording and communicating accounting information to external users. The course will discuss Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and explain how their framework fosters the relevance and reliability of financial statements. Students can expect an introduction to the techniques of accounting and the accounting profession with an emphasis on organizing information for decision making and the information needs of creditors and equity holders. Topics include financial statements, transaction analysis, accrual accounting, cash management, inventories, receivables, long-term and intangible assets, liabilities, stockholders' equity, cash flow statements, and financial statement analysis.
This course is conducted completely online. this class will have optional sync sessions/online office hours from 6-9 pm on Mondays. A technology fee will be added to tuition.

Summer 2017 Sec #20 (201-DL)
06/19/17 - 08/27/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open
ACCOUNT 202-DL Introduction to Managerial Accounting

A continuation of the introduction to accounting, with emphasis on providing relevant and timely accounting information and analysis to managers for use in planning, decision making, and controlling strategic operational objectives. Topics include the classifications of costs and different ways of reporting and analyzing those costs; the operating budgeting process; capital budgeting; and job-order, standard, process, and activity-based costing systems. Prerequisite: ACCOUNT 201.
The hours listed reflect the weeekly online office hours facilitated by the course instructor.
This course is conducted completely online. This class will have optional online office hours on Wednesdays from 6-9pm. A technology fee will be added to tuition.

Summer 2017 Sec #20 (202-DL)
06/19/17 - 08/27/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open
ACCOUNT 208-DL Income Tax I

Introduction to the field of taxation, with attention to individual income taxation. Gross income, capital gains, deductions, and alternate tax methods. IRS forms used. Prerequisite: ACCOUNT 202.
The hours listed reflect the weeekly online office hours facilitated by the course instructor.
This course is conducted completely online and will have optional online office hours on Mondays from 6-9pm. A technology fee will be added to tuition.

Summer 2017 Sec #20 (208-DL)
06/19/17 - 08/27/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open
ACCOUNT 210-DL Intermediate Accounting I

Accounting theory and concepts; analysis of special problems that arise in applying these underlying concepts to financial accounting. Accounting information as a basis for decisions by management, stockholders, creditors, and other users of financial and accounting reports. Prerequisite: ACCOUNT 202.
The hours listed reflect the weeekly online office hours facilitated by the course instructor.
This course is conducted completely online and will have optional online office hours from 6-9pm on Tuesdays. A technology fee will be added to tuition.

Summer 2017 Sec #20 (210-DL)
06/19/17 - 08/27/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open
ACCOUNT 310-DL Managerial Cost Accounting

Managerial uses of cost data in planning, controlling, and evaluating organizational activities and in making business decisions. Topics include discussion of activity-based costing, standard costs, inventory costing, and review of cost allocation techniques. In addition, contemporary topics, including pricing decisions, balanced scorecard, and capital budgeting techniques will be discussed, along with ethical and behavioral issues addressing both manufacturing and service sectors. Pre-requisite: ACCOUNT 202
This course is conducted completely online and will have optional online office hours from 6-9pm on Thursdays. A technology fee will be added to tuition.

 

 

Summer 2017 Sec #20 (310-DL)
06/19/17 - 08/27/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open
ACCOUNT 390-DL Research and Communication

CPAs are required to conduct research when performing tax, accounting, and auditing services. The successful accountant will not only be able to access and utilize online databases but also concisely convey their findings to clients and third parties using proper grammar and punctuation. This course introduces the type of research the professional will encounter in their practice and covers the available research databases and steps to conduct such research. Also covered are communication techniques, grammar, and punctuation. Students who plan to take the CPA exam after July 1, 2013, will need to demonstrate that they have covered this subject in their course work.
The hours listed reflect the weeekly online office hours facilitated by the course instructor.
This course is conducted completely online and will have optional online office hours on Mondays from 6-9pm. A technology fee will be added to tuition.

Summer 2017 Sec #20 (390-DL)
06/19/17 - 08/27/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open
ACCOUNT 390-DL Topics in Accounting: International Accounting

This course covers accounting issues uniquely confronted by companies involved in international business. The primary focus of the course is to provide an overview of international accounting by drawing on real business problems, economies, and finance in order to understand what is contained in and how to develop and interpret financial reports. The course includes fundamental financial accounting concepts and methods across countries.
The hours listed reflect the weeekly online office hours facilitated by the course instructor.
This course is conducted completely online and will have optional online office hours on Wednesdays from 6-9pm. A technology fee will be added to tuition.

Summer 2017 Sec #30 (390-DL)
06/19/17 - 08/27/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open
African American Studies
AF_AM_ST 380-0 Topic: Muhammad Ali: Race, Sports, and Politics

The recent passing of boxing legend Muhammad Ali offers a keen reminder of how significant sports is to racial politics (and vice versa) in U.S. history and popular culture. This course will examine that history and culture through the biographical lens of Ali and other prominent sports figures of color such as Serena Williams, Colin Kaepernick, Kareem Abdul Jabbar, Simone Briles and Jackie Robinson. The “controversy” stirred by each figure will be contextualized by time period they competed within and in order to better understand how and why each athlete became a politically galvanizing figure in their day and age

Summer 2017 Sec #22
06/19/17 - 07/02/17 MTuWTh 9:30 – 11:15 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open
AF_AM_ST 380-0 8 White Identities; 2 White Regimes

This course explores and discusses the modern meaning of whiteness as a political identification and regime within the US. Using a mixture of theoretical texts, historical materials and popular culture it analyses what has become known as 'the 8 white identities' available within the contemporary political spectrum. The course places these identities in the context of the two main political regimes of whiteness that dominate contemporary thinking: the regime of white supremacy and the regime of white privilege.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 3 – 5 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
African Studies
AFST 276-0 African Literature in Translation

AFST 276-0-20 "African Literature in Translation ", Richard Lepine The course is primarily a survey of African oral verbal arts traditions, with an additional focus on the links between these traditions and African films. The original works of art, the objects of study in the course, are not literature in the strict sense of the term--written verbal art--but rather take form in oral performance or electronic media like film, TV, radio, recorded disks, and web-based digital media. However, in print and in English translation, the course examples from various genres of African oral verbal arts performances (riddles, poetry, proverbs, panegyric, folktales, trickster tales, hero tales, epics) are all experienced as literature for purposes of analysis and interpretation. Four African films will also serve as primary course "texts": Wend Kuuni (1982; Gaston Kaboré, dir.; Burkina Faso), Keita: Heritage of the Griot (1995; Dani Kouyaté, dir.; Burkina Faso); La vie est belle/Life Is Rosy (1987; Ngangura Mweze and Bernard Lamy, dirs.; Zaïre [Democratic Republic of Congo]), and Yeelen (Souleymane Cissé, Mali, 1987, 105 min.). A major goal of the course is to explore the analytic approaches employed by scholars Harold Scheub and Robert Cancel, specialists in African oral traditions and their relationships with other arts media.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
AFST 390-0 Special Topics: Anthropology of African Civil Wars

The proliferation of civil wars across the globe and the rise of insurgency groups (as well as the role of international terrorist tactics) are defining issues of the 21st century, involving insistent questions about terrorism, genocide, child soldiers, sexual violence as a weapon of war, etc. This course addresses these issues by focusing on cases of civil war and insurgencies in Africa, including the civil wars in Liberia and Sierra Leone where the instructor has done most of his research. The course is organized around two central theoretical problems: (1) the relationship between the micro-level patterns of violence in a civil war and the macro-level causes of the war, and (2) the patron-client networks that shape the institutions and organizations of civil war in Africa. Readings will emphasize ethnographic methods for addressing these theoretical issues. No prerequisites required. Cross-listed with ANTHRO 390-0.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Anthropology
ANTHRO 105-0 Evolution & Social Behavior: The Basics

This course addresses the question of how evolution has shaped social behavior. Basic theory concerning how evolution shaped social behavior in animals and human beings is presented. Ethnographic and other anthropological evidence supporting the use of this theory to explain human social behavior is then presented. Some of the views presented are controversial.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 1 – 3:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ANTHRO 211-0 Culture and Society

This course is a basic introduction to cultural anthropology, and especially to ethnography: the core research tool of the qualitative social sciences. Ethnographies are long-term, intimate studies of a community or a group – at their best, they are as gripping as a good novel or a movie, but based in fact, not fiction. This methodology was developed by cultural anthropologists and is used widely today in consumer research, education, sociology, and medicine. In this course, we will read some good ethnographies, watch classic documentaries and even listen to music on a wide variety of interesting topics including race, sex, and gender; food, family, illness and wellness; and whatever else ethnographers are looking at these days. The case studies will include examples from the U.S. as well as Latin America and the world. Grading will be based on class participation and two essay exams.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ANTHRO 213-0 Human Origins

Anthropology is a holistic analysis of the human condition. The study of human origins, or paleoanthropology, is a subfield of physical anthropology that focuses on the biological history of the human species including their evolution, emergence and radiation. We will explore the scientific method and how theories like evolution have come about and expanded over time. We will learn about our closest living relatives – primates – and how an appreciation of their life history and behavior reflect the modern human condition. Many of the principles and concepts that comprise our understanding of how humans have evolved and adapted over time involve an appreciation of ecology, genetics, physiology, adaptation and cultural development that will also be explored. Lastly we will look at modern human diversity and discuss how we are continuing to evolve today.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ANTHRO 214-0 Archaeology: Unearthing History

The Pyramids, Stonehenge, Cahokia, and Great Zimbabwe: who built these monuments, and why? They are often associated with buried treasure, lost civilizations, and a forgotten past. But archaeologists look beyond a Romantic view and ask questions about why they were built, and what they tell us about humankind. By learning about past cultures, what made them different and what made them similar, we gain a better understanding of human history and the state of the world today. People in the past were very different, but they shared one thing In common—they left behind stones and bones, pottery fragments, great monuments, and burial offerings. These vestiges of the past are used by archaeologists to build an understanding of what it means to be human. In this class, you will be introduced to the questions, theories, and methods of archaeology. You will learn about how archaeologists locate, survey, and excavate the great monuments of the past; how they study artifacts in the lab; and how they use the stuff they find to piece together stories about the past, and test those stories against the evidence. You will learn about the diversity of ancient and modern peoples, their cultures, and the past they inhabited. You will also learn about the place of archaeology in the modern world—how archaeologists engage with questions such as long-term climate change and human response, sustainability, and inequality.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 1 – 3:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ANTHRO 390-0 Topics in Anthropology: Anthropology of African Civil Wars

Anthropology of African Civil Wars (Combined with AFST 390-0) Understanding civil war is a central intellectual (and political) challenge of the contemporary global world, involving insistent questions about terrorism, genocide, child soldiers, sexual violence, etc. This course examines a variety of cases of contemporary African civil wars but is framed by general questions about the logic of violence in any social context. The course focuses on: (a) the micro-practices of violence in the daily organization of civil war, especially the language and ideology of violence invoked in those social practices, and (b) the relationship between everyday social practices of violence and macro-level structural forces of politics and economics. Readings are mainly from anthropology but other social sciences that use ethnographic methods to study civil war will be discussed.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Arabic
ARABIC 111-1 Arabic I

This first segment of the three-quarter first-year course facilitates students' learning of the alphabet and sound system, and helps them develop basic speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. It also introduces students to the diglossic sociolinguistic environment of the Arab World, and provides exposure to basic, high frequency regional spoken variety elements. This course is designed for true beginners with no previous background in the language. Students with any background must take a placement test and consult with the Coordinator before enrolling.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
ARABIC 111-2 Arabic I

This second course builds upon the material presented in the first term, introducing additional fundamental sentence structures, expanding vocabulary, and providing students an opportunity to further practice and expand the basic skills acquired in the first segment. As with 111-1, students should plan on significant homework outside of class, in addition to the daily class meeting.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
07/10/17 - 07/30/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
ARABIC 111-3 Arabic I

This is the third part of our year-long elementary course which constitutes an introduction to Arabic. The main focus of the class is Modern Standard Arabic, used for reading and writing. Considerable exposure to spoken Arabic varieties is included to help prepare students for spoken interactions in Arabic speaking countries. The main emphasis will continue to be on learning the basic structures of the language, reading & writing simple texts and developing oral communication skills. Although students will begin to develop a useful knowledge of Arabic over the first year, the second year of Arabic is strongly recommended to those students desiring to acquire effective use of the language, and to students who need to fulfill the WCAS foreign language requirement.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
07/31/17 - 08/20/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
ARABIC 121-1 Arabic II

This first segment of the three-quarter course (121) is a continuation of Arabic I (111), and moves students forward in all modes of language use, including additional exposure to representative regional spoken varieties, work on more sophisticated written expression and reading abilities for higher level/more abstract types of texts.

Summer 2017 Sec #1
06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MTuWThF 1 – 4 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ARABIC 121-2 Arabic II

This is the second part of a three-quarter course (121) which continues the path of Arabic I (111-1,2,3). This course deals with the next level of essential topics for daily and literary use of the Arabic language. The emphasis of this course will be on training students to read and understand a wider variety of Arabic texts and to work toward more efficient reading, to discuss orally text content and to write short paragraphs and translation (English/Arabic/English). In addition to the textbook used for instruction, there will be other selections for outside reading, predominantly taken from news sources, and use of audio-visual materials.

Summer 2017 Sec #2
07/10/17 - 07/30/17 MTuWThF 1 – 4 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ARABIC 121-3 Arabic ll

This is the third segment of a three-quarter course (121) which follows Arabic I (111-1,2,3). This course deals with the next level of essential topics and structures for daily and literary use of the Arabic language. The emphasis of this course will be on training students to read and understand Arabic texts and to work toward more efficient reading, to orally discuss text content, to write short paragraphs and sentences, understand basic spoken formal and less-formal speech in Arabic and engage in conversation on specific topics. In addition to the textbook used for instructions, there will be other selections for outside reading, predominately taken from news sources, and use of audio-visual materials, including sound files available through password protected websites.

Summer 2017 Sec #3
07/31/17 - 08/20/17 MTuWThF 1 – 4 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Art
ART 150-0 Introduction to Photography

This course is an introduction to photographic equipment, materials, and processes that includes extensive darkroom instruction in black-and-white printing and creative darkroom control. The aesthetics of camera vision are explored through classroom discussion and lectures. This is an intensive workshop-style class consisting of two six-hour sessions each week with 30-minute lunch breaks. Attendance at the first class meeting is required, and students must come equipped with a 35mm film camera that can be operated with all automatic settings off. Bring one roll of Kodak TriX film to the first class. No previous studio experience required. Enrollment is limited to 12. Students must bring a 35mm camera that can be operated manually and a roll of Tri-x 400 b&w, 36 exp. film to first class.

Summer 2017 Sec #24
06/19/17 - 07/16/17 MW 9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Astronomy
ASTRON 101-0 Modern Cosmology

The modern Big Bang perspective on the origin, structure, evolution, and fate of the universe. Topics to be discussed include the extragalactic distance scale, the Hubble expansion, the large-scale clustering of galaxies, cosmic inflation and the early universe, Big Bang nucleosynthesis, the cosmic microwave background radiation, dark matter, dark energy, and the recent evidence for acceleration in the expansion of the universe. This course counts toward the Weinberg College Natural Sciences distribution requirement, Area I. This distribution course is designed for nonscience majors.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MTuWThF 2 – 3:50 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ASTRON 120-0 Highlights of Astronomy

This course will explore our modern ideas about the solar system, stars, galaxies, and the universe. Topics to be discussed include extrasolar planets, supernovae, black holes, dark matter, the big bang theory and the search for life in the universe.

Learning Objectives:

  • Correlate understanding of basic physical principles to astrophysical applications in order to explain how we know what we know about the universe
  • Explain the development of fundamental theories such as the Nebular Hypothesis of solar system formation and the Big Bang theory of the universe\'s origin and evolution.
  • Analyze levels of certainty in the fundamental theories (Nebular Hypothesis, Big Bang theory, etc.) compared to alternative ideas.
  • Apply fundamental concepts in astronomy to current research results.
  • Analyze a scientific theory to determine whether it is a good theory.

Natural Sciences Distro Area


Additional Information:

Class Materials (Required):  Universe, 10th Edition: Freedman & Kauffman, ISBN: 9781464124921.

Class Notes:

This class is intended for non-science majors and no previous background in physics or astronomy is needed. Although equations are introduced in class, no mathematical problem solving is required. We will cover foundational principles of gravity, light and motion that are needed to understand astronomy phenomena and astronomical theories.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 1 – 3:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Biological Sciences
BIOL_SCI 170-CN Concepts of Biology

Fundamentals of biology. Chemical composition and organization of living material, cellular organization, energy conversion by organisms, genetics and reproduction, ecology, evolution, and other topics. Student-designed project work. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 MW 6:15 – 9:15 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
BIOL_SCI 217-0 Physiology

Mammalian physiology, with an emphasis on human physiology. We will examine the functioning of organisms at the cellular, tissue and organ/organ system level. Emphasis will be placed on control systems and the integration of organ systems to maintain homeostasis. Topics will include nervous, endocrine, sensory, renal, respiratory, muscular and cardiovascular system physiology.


Prerequisite: Chem 102 or 171

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 9 – 11:30 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open
BIOL_SCI 219-0 Cell Biology

This course is part of the four-course introductory biology sequence. The cell biology course covers mechanisms the cell uses to compartmentalize and transport proteins, to move, to regulate growth and death, and to communicate with their environments.

Prequisties: Chem 102 or 171

 

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MWF 9 – 10:30 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open
BIOL_SCI 220-0 Genetics and Molecular Processes Laboratory

Students will design their own laboratory experiment using a defined model. Laboratory techniques and experiments in fundamental aspects of transmission genetics and molecular biology will be used.

Please note: this lab earns credit of .34 unit of credit and the corresponding tuition applies.

 

Prerequisites:  CHEM 102 or 171

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/02/17 MTuWThF 1 – 4 p.m. Tech Institute MG72
Evanston Campus Open
BIOL_SCI 221-0 Cellular Processes Laboratory

Students will design their own laboratory experiment using a defined model. Laboratory techniques and experiments in fundamental aspects of cell biology will be used.

Prerequisites:  Biol_Sci 220

Please note: this lab earns credit of .34 unit of credit and the corresponding tuition applies.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
07/03/17 - 07/16/17 MTuWThF 1 – 4 p.m. Tech Institute MG72
Evanston Campus Open
BIOL_SCI 222-0 Physiological Processes Laboratory

This course will consist of one project, a transgenic Drosophila model of Parkinson's Disease. Throughout the term emphasis will be placed on the steps of the scientific process: Formulating hypotheses, designing and executing experiments, analyzing data (including statistical analyses), and presenting results in written and oral formats. Students will work in groups of 3 or 4 for the project.

Prerequisites: Biol_Sci 221

Please note: this lab earns credit of .34 unit of credit and the corresponding tuition applies.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
07/24/17 - 08/06/17 MTuWThF 1 – 4 p.m. Tech Institute MG72
Evanston Campus Open
BIOL_SCI 302-0 Fundamentals of Neurobiology

Fundamentals of Neurology will explore the structure and function of the central nervous system, from the molecular to the systems/behavioral level. This course will provide an introduction to a number fo concepts in cellular and systems neurology, with a emphasis on: ion channel structure and function; the structure and function of neurons and glia; the ionic basis of the membrane potential, graded potential and action potential; synaptic physiology, neuromodulation, neuronal networks; neural plasticity, including learning and memory.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
BIOL_SCI 308-0 Biochemistry

Basic concepts and experimental approaches in Biochemistry, emphasizing the structure and function of biological macromolecules, fundamental cellular biochemical processes, and the chemical logic of metabolic transformations

Prerequisites:  Biol_Sci 217 and 219; Chem 210-2 or 212-2

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MWF 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
BIOL_SCI 313-CN Human Anatomy

Introduction to human anatomy. System approach to anatomical organization. Sections of the body; musculoskeletal and nervous systems. Embryology development. Lecture course supplemented by selected prosections of human cadavers and dry exercises using bones, models, and computer animations. Prerequisite: BIOL SCI 165, 170, or equivalent course. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 W 6 – 9 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open
BIOL_SCI 313-DL Human Anatomy

This course is conducted completely online. This is a course directed at the introduction of human anatomical form and organization. Body structure will be studied with a regional approach and will involve a primarily gross anatomical study with supplementary histological and clinical material where relevant. Form-function relationships will be emphasized. Topics covered will include: anatomical terminology, cells and tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic/immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. The systems will be covered as they are encountered in the regional approach. Readings are assigned from the Marieb, Wilhelm and Mallatt text. Prerequisite: BIOL SCI 165, 170, or equivalent course. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.
This course is conducted completely online. A technology fee will be added to tuition.

Summer 2017 Sec #20 (313-DL)
06/19/17 - 08/27/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open
BIOL_SCI 316-CN Human Structure and Function

Students will gain a good working knowledge of the function of the musculoskeletal system in modern humans in this course, along with a comparative perspective emphasizing the adaptive contexts of the evolutionary transformations leading to our modern anatomy. The course examines the structural, functional, and evolutionary anatomy of humans, with primary focus on the musculoskeletal system of the postcranium. The regional anatomy of the muscles, bones and joints in the human body serves as a basis for more general biomechanical principles of anatomical systems. Discussions of the development evolution and clinical significance of human structure complement the functional emphasis on these anatomical regions. Class lectures are supplemented by selected prosections of human cadavers, in-class lab sessions examining bones and models, and computer animations and exercises. Prerequisite: BIOL SCI 313, equivalent anatomy course, or permission of instructor. Class is limited to 15 students.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 M 6 – 9 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open
BIOL_SCI 328-CN Microbiology

This course provides an introduction to bacteria with an emphasis on their impact on human health and society. Topics covered include bacterial morphology/structure, physiology, and metabolism, in addition to the principles of bacterial replication, and basic bacterial genetics. Practical applications of bacteriology and bacteriological research are explored, including genetic engineering and biotechnology. Studies are made on the impacts of microorganisms on human health include a discussion of bacterial pathogenesis, current challenges regarding antimicrobial resistance, and the human microbiome. Students have an opportunity to explore current topics in microbiology of interest. BIOL SCI 210-A, -B, -C, or equivalent basic familiarity with biology and evolution. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Please note that there will be $50 lab fee associated with the course.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 W 6 – 9:15 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Chicago Field Studies
CFS 291-0 Analysis of the Field Experience

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

The course provides an opportunity for students to critically reflect on their internships through readings and discussions posted on Canvas and a few reflective papers. There is one mandatory meeting scheduled prior to the end of spring quarter that all students are required to attend before leaving for their summer internships.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/20/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Open
Summer 2017 Sec #38
06/01/17 - 08/31/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Open
CFS 388-0 Field Studies in Business Culture

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

While interning at companies or organizations throughout the country, students in this online-only seminar will explore key social, cultural, and political problems shaping business culture today, especially as it pertains to interns and internships. Through course readings, online discussions, and asynchronous assignments, students will learn how business culture has evolved over the past century, and shaped our understanding and engagement with difficult social issues, including technological change, racial and gender diversity, economic inequality, and work-life balance. By the end of the quarter, students will be able to think about, speak about, and act more knowledgeably within the complex world of contemporary business culture.

Summer 2017 Sec #10
06/19/17 - 08/20/17 M 7 – 8:30 p.m.
Off Campus Open
Summer 2017 Sec #29
06/01/17 - 08/31/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Open
CFS 391-0 Field Studies in Social Justice

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

Students participate in one class, which focuses on key issues surrounding race, gender, and violence as they pertain to the Chicago area. In the course, students will examine the factors that place individuals at risk for victimization and perpetration. Students will unpack some of the myth and realities about violence and focus on the different racial/class/gender discourses that surround the issues. Finally, students will also explore some of the interventions that have been developed to address various forms of violence. Internships serve as sites for original research. Discussions and assignments examine course readings in light of this research.


Summer 2017 Sec #10
06/19/17 - 08/20/17 M 5:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
CFS 393-1 Modern Workplace Culture

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

CFS 393-1 and 393-2: Field Studies in the Modern Workplace: Your internship enlists you as part of the Chicago workforce. This interdisciplinary course is designed to deepen that experience by exploring the cultural and historical construction of work over the past 150 years, in Chicago especially. Discussions and assignments will prompt you to compare your experience with that of other student-interns, to examine the particularities of your internship site within the city, and to analyze your work this quarter within the history of the modern workplace more broadly understood. The overarching goal of the course is to understand modern labor as a contingent and contextual experience, as a practice conceptualized, produced, and organized over time around changing values and norms. Consequently, our texts—pulled from history, sociology, literature, film, journalism, and beyond—will challenge the standard conception of work as a perfectly natural, taken-for-granted practice. Together, we will study your workplace and the people within it, learn more about the history of your office or industry in the city, and come to an informed perspective on what “the modern workplace” is—or could be.

Summer 2017 Sec #10
06/19/17 - 08/20/17 M 5:30 – 7 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
CFS 393-2 Contemporary Issues in the Workplace

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

CFS 393-1 and 393-2: Field Studies in the Modern Workplace: Your internship enlists you as part of the Chicago workforce. This interdisciplinary course is designed to deepen that experience by exploring the cultural and historical construction of work over the past 150 years, in Chicago especially. Discussions and assignments will prompt you to compare your experience with that of other student-interns, to examine the particularities of your internship site within the city, and to analyze your work this quarter within the history of the modern workplace more broadly understood. The overarching goal of the course is to understand modern labor as a contingent and contextual experience, as a practice conceptualized, produced, and organized over time around changing values and norms. Consequently, our texts—pulled from history, sociology, literature, film, journalism, and beyond—will challenge the standard conception of work as a perfectly natural, taken-for-granted practice. Together, we will study your workplace and the people within it, learn more about the history of your office or industry in the city, and come to an informed perspective on what “the modern workplace” is—or could be.

Comments

Summer 2017 Sec #10
06/19/17 - 08/20/17 M 7 – 8:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
CFS 394-1 Legal Process and Culture

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

CFS 394-1 and 394-2, Legal Field Studies: What is law? Who makes it and decides what it is? Who are legal practitioners and what do they do? What role do race, class, and power play and how do they affect the law, our own practice, legal education, and our vision of the past, present, and future?

Students in the Legal Field Studies concentration participate in two classes: Organizational Culture & Legal Process and Contemporary Issues in Law. These classes examine the intersection of law, culture, and society in the United States.

Summer 2017 Sec #10
06/19/17 - 08/20/17 W 5 – 6:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
CFS 394-2 Contemporary Issues in Law

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

CFS 394-1 and 394-2, Legal Field Studies: What is law? Who makes it and decides what it is? Who are legal practitioners and what do they do? What role do race, class, and power play and how do they affect the law, our own practice, legal education, and our vision of the past, present, and future? Students in the Legal Field Studies concentration participate in two classes: Organizational Culture & Legal Process and Contemporary Issues in Law. These classes examine the intersection of law, culture, and society in the United States.

Summer 2017 Sec #10
06/19/17 - 08/20/17 W 6:30 – 8 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
CFS 395-1 Business Workplace Culture

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

CFS 395-1 and 395-2, Business Field Studies: Business Field Studies examines the organizational and cultural forms of work and the modern business workplace. Businesses from Wall Street to Silicon Valley have developed different corporate cultures. Understanding key issues and aspects of these cultures will help students find where they can thrive and give them the tools to negotiate issues they will face in their own workplace. Both courses focus on the internship experience, though in different ways. Business Workplace Culture stresses analysis of the internship and offers practical tools to navigate the modern business landscape. Contemporary Issues in Business explores a range of topics, including the historical rise of the corporation, its evolving role in society, and the search for meaning in the workplace, all through the lens of theoretical and practical materials including current events, news, and media.

Summer 2017 Sec #10
06/19/17 - 08/20/17 M 5:30 – 7 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
CFS 395-2 Business Field Studies: Contemporary Issues in Business

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

CFS 395-1 and 395-2, Business Field Studies: Business Field Studies examines the organizational and cultural forms of work and the modern business workplace. Businesses from Wall Street to Silicon Valley have developed different corporate cultures. Understanding key issues and aspects of these cultures will help students find where they can thrive and give them the tools to negotiate issues they will face in their own workplace. Both courses focus on the internship experience, though in different ways. Business Workplace Culture stresses analysis of the internship and offers practical tools to navigate the modern business landscape. Contemporary Issues in Business explores a range of topics, including the historical rise of the corporation, its evolving role in society, and the search for meaning in the workplace, all through the lens of theoretical and practical materials including current events, news, and media.

Summer 2017 Sec #10
06/19/17 - 08/20/17 M 7 – 8:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
CFS 397-0 Field Studies in Civic Engagement: Engage Chicago

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

CFS 397-0 (Field Studies in Civic Engagement: Engage Chicago) is designed for participants in the Engage Chicago immersive summer program. Participants in CFS 397-0 learn from top Northwestern faculty as well as prominent leaders within the Chicago community. The course offers an opportunity to study the theory and research that underlie the hands-on work students are doing in the field at their internship sites. Course format combines lectures, readings, presentations by local experts, student assignments, class discussions, and field experiences. The course content includes urban studies, contemporary social issues, community development and theories and methods of social change- including an examination of both historical and current issues in Chicago. Students in CFS 397-0 will examine the complexities of major American cities; become familiar with important social change and community development strategies; gain exposure to and understanding of contemporary social issues; and examine ways to utilize their own skills and abilities to enhance their own learning while contributing to the public good.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/20/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Open
CFS 398-0 Field Studies in Humanities

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

What is work and what might it mean to a student of the humanities? How do representations of work (in literature, on TV or film…) shape our sense of what work is today? What kinds of activities might constitute work in cultural institutions, arts organizations, socially-conscious start-ups, or not-for-profits in general? And what kinds of questions might these organizations and career paths raise – for you personally, generationally, systemically, globally, and so on? This course offers an introductory cultural history of “white collar” work with a focus on not–for–profits, public humanities organizations, and related institutions, but the diverse range of readings, reflection exercises, research assignments, and class discussions makes it flexible enough to engage any CFS internship. Readings will come from a wide array of fields in the humanities and social sciences. Course assignments will emphasize dynamic critical thinking and reflection. You will get the chance to think deeply and critically (which does not necessarily mean cynically) about your internship, and to learn extensively from your peers’ experiences.

Summer 2017 Sec #10
06/19/17 - 08/20/17 Tu 5:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Chemistry
CHEM 101-0 General Chemistry

The first in a three-course sequence in college-level chemistry for science majors, serving as preparation for more advanced chemistry courses such as organic chemistry and physical chemistry and as the general chemistry preparation required for professional schools. Because of the intensive nature of these courses, it is recommended that students not register concurrently for other courses. Descriptive chemistry, elements and compounds; basic chemical calculations, mole problems, stoichiometry, and solution concentrations; gas laws; thermochemistry; quantum theory and electronic structure of atoms; periodic properties of the elements; nuclear chemistry; chemical bonding. Must be taken concurrently with Chem 121.


Chemistry 101-0 students MUST also enroll in the laboratory class (CHEM 121-0.) on Monday/Wednesday, 1-5pm. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has a lab fee of $250.


Prerequisite: one year of high school chemistry and algebra or consent of instructor.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I. Due to limited space in chemistry courses during Summer Session, priority is given to visiting, degree-seeking, and certificate (Professional Health Careers) students. SPS students-at-large may register starting on June 10 if space is available.

Summer 2017 Sec #23
06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
CHEM 102-0 General Inorganic Chemistry

The second in a three-course sequence in college-level chemistry for science majors, serving as preparation for more advanced chemistry courses such as organic chemistry and physical chemistry and as the general chemistry preparation required for professional schools. Because of the intensive nature of these courses, it is recommended that students not register concurrently for other courses. Descriptive chemistry, inorganic reactions; chemical bonding; condensed phases; introduction to chemical equilibria; phase equilibria; solutions and colligative properties; metal complexes. Must be taken concurrently with Chem 122. AP credit for Chem 101 does not allow registration for Chem 102. Prerequisite: Chem 101 and Chem 121 (C– or better).

Chemistry 102-0 students MUST also enroll in the laboratory class (CHEM 122-0.) on Monday/Wednesday, 1-5pm. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has a lab fee of $250.


Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry 101-0 or course deemed equivalent by department/instructor with a grade of C- or better.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I. Due to limited space in chemistry courses during Summer Session, priority is given to visiting, degree-seeking, and certificate (Professional Health Careers) students. SPS students-at-large may register starting on June 10 if space is available.

Summer 2017 Sec #23
07/10/17 - 07/30/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
CHEM 103-0 General Physical Chemistry

The third in a three-course sequence in college-level chemistry for science majors, serving as preparation for more advanced chemistry courses such as organic chemistry and physical chemistry and as the general chemistry preparation required for professional schools. Because of the intensive nature of these courses, it is recommended that students not register concurrently for other courses. Chemical equilibrium; equilibria in aqueous solution; thermodynamics; chemical kinetics; electrochemistry and oxidation-reduction reactions; solid-state chemistry; industrial chemical processes. Must be taken with Chem 123. A grade of C– or better in Chem 103 required to enroll for any higher-level chemistry course. Prerequisites: Chem 102 (C– or better), Chem 122 (C– or better),  and MATH 220 or equivalent.

 

Chemistry 103-0 students MUST also enroll in the laboratory class (CHEM 123-0.) on Monday/Wednesday, 1-5pm.  The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an a lab fee of $250.


Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry 102-0 or course deemed equivalent by department/instructor with a grade of C- or better.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement. Due to limited space in chemistry courses during Summer Session, priority is given to visiting, degree-seeking, and certificate (Professional Health Careers) students. SPS students-at-large may register starting on June 10 if space is available.

Summer 2017 Sec #23
07/31/17 - 08/20/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
CHEM 121-0 General Chemistry Lab

Chemical analysis of real samples using basic laboratory techniques, including titration, colorimetric analysis, density measurements, and atomic spectroscopy. Planning, data collection, interpretation, and reporting on these experiments. Must be taken concurrently with Chem 101.

General Chemistry Lab. Students enrolled in Chem 101-0 must also register for Lab 121-0 section 33. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has a lab fee of $250.

Summer 2017 Sec #33
06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MW 1 – 5 p.m. Tech Institute HG10
Evanston Campus Open
CHEM 122-0 General Inorganic Chemistry Lab

Chemistry laboratory techniques applied to materials science and nanotechnology. Planning, data collection, interpretation, and reporting on experiments. Must be taken concurrently with Chem 102. Prerequisite: Chem 101 and Chem 121 (C– or better).

General Inorganic Chemistry Lab. Students enrolled in Chem 102-0 must also register for Lab 122-0 section 33. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has a lab fee of $250.

Summer 2017 Sec #33
07/10/17 - 07/30/17 MW 1 – 5 p.m. Tech Institute HG10
Evanston Campus Open
CHEM 123-0 General Physical Chemistry Lab

Chemistry laboratory techniques applied to biosensor technology using concepts of acid-base chemistry, kinetics, and the like. Design of a biosensor. Planning, data collection, interpretation, and reporting on experiments. Must be taken concurrently with Chem 103. Prerequisite: Chem 102 and Chem 122 (C– or better).

General Physical Chemistry Lab. Students enrolled in Chem 103-0 must also register for Lab 123-0 section 33. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an additional lab fee of $250.

Summer 2017 Sec #33
07/31/17 - 08/20/17 MW 1 – 5 p.m. Tech Institute HG10
Evanston Campus Open
CHEM 210-1 Organic Chemistry

The first of a three-course sequence in organic chemistry for science majors, serving as preparation required for professional and graduate schools. Because of the intensive nature of these courses, it is recommended that students not register concurrently for other courses. Tuition is billed on a per-course basis. Basic concepts of structure, stereochemistry, and reactivity of organic compounds. The chemistry of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, and alcohols. Prerequisite: one year of general chemistry with laboratory or consent of instructor.

 

Chemistry 210-1 ONLY, the laboratory section is part of the Chemistry 210-1 course and does not bear .34 units of credit. Separate registration is not required for the lab portion of this class. Please note the meeting pattern of Chemistry 210-1: 9am-12pm Monday through Friday and 1pm - 2pm Monday, Wednesday and Friday.


Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry 103-0 or course deemed equivalent by department/instructor and Chem 123 with a grade of C- or better. Alternatively, one year of general chemistry with laboratory as deemed equivalent by department/instructor.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I. Due to limited space in chemistry courses during Summer Session, priority is given to visiting, degree-seeking, and certificate (Professional Health Careers) students. SPS students-at-large may register starting on June 10 if space is available.

Summer 2017 Sec #23


Course Materials:


06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MTuWThF
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
9 a.m. – noon
1-2pm
Evanston Campus Open
CHEM 210-2 Organic Chemistry

The second of a three-course sequence in organic chemistry for science majors, serving as preparation required for professional and graduate schools. Because of the intensive nature of these courses, it is recommended that students not register concurrently for other courses. The chemistry of aromatic, carbonyl, and nitrogen com-pounds; characterization of organic substances by chemical and spectral methods; reaction mechanisms. Must be taken concurrently with Chem 230-2. Prerequisite: Chem 210-1 (C– or better).


Chemistry 210-2 students MUST also enroll in the laboratory class (CHEM 230-2) that meets on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 1:00-5:30pm in Tech D220. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has a lab fee of $250.

 

Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry 210-1 or course deemed equivalent by department/instructor with a grade of C- or better.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I. Due to limited space in chemistry courses during Summer Session, priority is given to visiting, degree-seeking, and certificate (Professional Health Careers) students. SPS students-at-large may register starting on June 10 if space is available.

Summer 2017 Sec #23
07/10/17 - 07/30/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
CHEM 210-3 Organic Chemistry

The third in a three-course sequence in organic chemistry for science majors, serving as preparation required for professional and graduate schools. Because of the intensive nature of these courses, it is recommended that students not register concurrently for other courses. The chemistry of polyfunctional compounds of biological and medicinal interest. Modern organic synthesis, bioorganic chemistry, and recent developments in organic chemistry. Must be taken concurrently with Chem 230-3. Prerequisite: Chem 210-2 and Chem 230-2 (C– or better).

 

Chemistry 210-3 students MUST also enroll in the laboratory class (CHEM 230-3) that meets on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 1:00-5:30pm in Tech D220. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has a lab fee of $250.

Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry 210-2 or course deemed equivalent by department/instructor with a grade of C- or better.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I. Due to limited space in chemistry courses during Summer Session, priority is given to visiting, degree-seeking, and certificate (Professional Health Careers) students. SPS students-at-large may register starting on June 10 if space is available.

Summer 2017 Sec #23
07/31/17 - 08/20/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
CHEM 230-2 Organic Chemistry 210-2 lab

Instruction in experimental techniques of modern organic chemistry emphasizing chemical separations, spectroscopic characterization, and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkyl halides, alcohols, carbonyls, esters, and aromatic compounds. Must be taken concurrently with Chem 210-2. Prerequisite: Chem 210-1 (C– or better). The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has a lab fee of $250.

Summer 2017 Sec #33


Schedule Notes:


07/10/17 - 07/30/17 MWF 1 – 5:30 p.m. Tech Institute D220
Evanston Campus Open
CHEM 230-3 Organic Chemistry 210-3 lab

Experimental techniques of modern organic chemistry emphasizing chemical separations, spectroscopic characterization, and reactions such as amide synthesis, Grignard reaction, aldol condensation, Robinson annulation, and Diels-Alder reaction. Must be taken concurrently with Chem 210-3. Prerequisite: Chem 210-2 and Chem 230-2 (C– or better). The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has a lab fee of $250.

Summer 2017 Sec #33


Schedule Notes:


07/31/17 - 08/20/17 MWF 1 – 5:30 p.m. Tech Institute D220
Evanston Campus Open
Chinese

Introduction to the Summer Course

This three-course sequence (111-1, 2, 3) presents the material of the first year of the beginning Chinese curriculum in an intensive format over nine weeks, introducing the Pinyin system, grammar, and about 500-600 characters. The 150-minute-class meets 5 times per week, and provides a practical learner-centered curriculum, with the aim to help true beginners develop their communicative competence in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, while gaining competence in Chinese culture, making connections to their daily life, and building links among communities.

Students who successfully complete Summer Elementary Chinese 111-3 with the final course grade of C- or above may continue with the second-year Chinese (CHINESE 121-1) at Northwestern University.

CHINESE 111-1 Elementary Chinese

The first course in the Elementary Chinese sequence introduces the standard Chinese phonetics system-Pinyin, the Chinese writing system, basic grammar, and simple sentence structures. Speaking, listening, character, grammar, and communicative exercises are included throughout the course.

Summer 2017 Sec #23
06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
CHINESE 111-2 Elementary Chinese

The second course in the Elementary Chinese sequence focuses on the sound and writing of Chinese characters, expands vocabulary, introduces additional fundamental grammar and sentence structures, and encourages students to practice the basic skills of the language. Speaking, listening, character, grammar, and communicative exercises are included throughout the course. Chinese calligraphy and other forms of Chinese arts will be introduced.
Prerequisite: Chinese 111-1 with C- or above.

Summer 2017 Sec #23
07/10/17 - 07/30/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
CHINESE 111-3 Elementary Chinese

The third course in Elementary Chinese aims to help students obtain an adequate grasp of basic language skills in both spoken and written Chinese and lay a good foundation for further study of this language. Speaking, listening, character, grammar, and communicative exercises are included throughout the course. Prerequisite: Chinese 111-1, 2.

 

Summer 2017 Sec #23
07/31/17 - 08/20/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
Information Systems
CIS 212-CN Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming

This course focuses on developing complex programs using the Java object-oriented language. The course is the first of two courses in object-oriented programming for the School of Professional Studies Information Systems major. The course begins with a quick introduction to the basics of the Java language: variables, conditionals, looping and user-defined methods. Students write programs that utilize methods, arrays and array lists and exception handling for solving problems. Information hiding, inheritance, polymorphism, aggregation and interfaces as principles of object-oriented programming will be introduced. This course includes interactive lectures and labs. Students will be required to complete multiple computer programs and quizzes. A final assignment is required for students to illustrate their understanding of all programming topics covered in the course. May not be audited or taken P/N. SPS Information Systems majors or students with previous programming experience should enroll in this introductory 212 course. Non-majors or students with no previous programming experience should enroll in CIS 110-CN Introduction to Computer Programming. Northwestern day school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 M 6 – 9:15 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open
Communication Related Courses
CMN 110-0 Chicago/Evanston Internship

Students participate in off-campus experiential learning in companies related to their communication major. Enrollment by application in advance through EPICS office.

Summer 2017 Sec #21
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Open
CMN 110-0 Internship/Los Angeles

Students participate in off-campus experiential learning in companies related to their communication major. Enrollment by application in advance through EPICS office.

Summer 2017 Sec #23
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Open
CMN 225-0 Internship/ Chciago/Evanston

Students participate in off-campus experiential learning in companies related to their communication major. Enrollment by application in advance through EPICS office.

Summer 2017 Sec #21
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Open
CMN 225-0 Internship/Los Angeles

Students participate in off-campus experiential learning in companies related to their communication major. Enrollment by application in advance through EPICS office.

Summer 2017 Sec #23
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Open
CMN 340-0 Internship: Evanston

Students participate in off-campus experiential learning in companies related to their communication major. Enrollment by application in advance through EPICS office.

Summer 2017 Sec #21
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 Tu 7 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
CMN 340-0 Internship/ Los Angeles

Students participate in off-campus experiential learning in companies related to their communication major. Enrollment by application in advance through EPICS office.

Summer 2017 Sec #23
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Open
CMN 340-0 Internship: Extra Credit

Summer 2017 Sec #40
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Open
CMN 410-0 MFA Internship/ Field Studies

Students participate in off-campus experiential learning in companies related to their communication major. Enrollment by application in advance through EPICS office.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Open
Communication Studies
COMM_ST 102-0 Public Speaking

Overview of class SPCH GEN_CMN 102-0 Public Speaking. Theory, composition, delivery, and criticism of public speeches. Learning Objectives Public Speaking is a course designed for Communication Studies and Engineering majors but is open to all students at the university. The course has five goals. First, students should learn to participate in public deliberation by analyzing and crafting speeches to persuade fellow citizens regarding matters of policy. Second, the course provides students with an opportunity to develop competencies in research, argumentation, and writing. Third, the course provides students the opportunity to gain confidence and delivery skills as public speakers. Fourth, the course teaches some elements of basic communication theory. Finally, the course incorporates civic engagement through its content and context in an effort to encourage community awareness. Together, these goals will help students to become more adept at public speaking and better prepared for civic participation and leadership 1. Students will become confident, articulate communicators by gaining theoretical and practical knowledge of public speaking with a focus on civic persuasion. 2. Students will learn to research and organize ideas to create a clear, concise, and engaging presentation. 3. Students will learn to analyze and adapt speech content and delivery for different audiences. 4. Students will improve their individual speaking style by studying public speaking skills as both a speaker and an observer. 5. Students will develop their critical thinking skills through the exploration of issues of civic importance and the development compelling arguments. Evaluation Method Students will each deliver a variety of speeches, with a minimum of three (3) major speeches during the quarter with additional minor speeches. Students will be assessed with written feedback for each major speech.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Summer 2017 Sec #21
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
COMM_ST 205-0 Theories of Persuasion

This course is designed to make the student aware of major theoretical perspectives of persuasion. The student will be expected to exhibit understanding and retention of key concepts and theories. As such, the primary course content will come from social scientific theory and research. We will explore general perspectives of persuasion as well as those focused on particular contexts (e.g., advertising, bargaining and negotiation). The primary method of teaching will be lecture and students are encouraged to ask questions and offer examples.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
COMM_ST 205-CN Theories of Persuasion

This course surveys major theories that explain how to change another person's attitudes and behaviors. Applications to persuasion within a variety of contexts are covered, including relationships, organizations, legal campaigns, and mass culture. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. In-class meeting dates will be announced. This course is open to to Organization Behavior: Business Leadership year one cohort students only. This course will meet on 7/29, 8/12, 8/19 in an intensive format.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
07/24/17 - 08/27/17 Sa 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open
COMM_ST 250-CN Team Leadership and Decision Making

1.This course examines theories and research relating to the various processes by which leaders make decisions, affect group behavior, and engage groups in a variety of task- and strategy-related outcomes. Group communication is stressed, with a particular emphasis on change and conflict. This course is open to to Organization Behavior: Business Leadership year one cohort students only. This course will meet on 7/1, 7/8, 7/15 and 7/22 in an intensive format.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 Sa 9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open
COMM_ST 395-CN Topics in Communication Studies: Sales, Relationship Building and Client Retention

This course is designed to help sellers of all types, whether clients are internal or external to the organization, understand how communications is used throughout the sales process, with a focus on identifying, qualifying, developing and maintaining long-term client relationships. Creating and communicating value are pivotal to sales, and the course will provide students with the skills and knowledge required to build and sustain organizational customer/client relationship management efforts. The course will focus on current best practices in managing sales initiatives and client communications. Northwestern day school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 M 6 – 9:15 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open
COMM_ST 395-SA Topics in Communication Studies

Students take this course as part of the Global Engagement Studies Institute (GESI) program. Enrollment is by application only. This course helps GESI students strengthen local community development efforts by identifying and harnessing existing community assets. The practical lessons in this course include asset mapping and identifying processes that improve intra- and inter-team communication and relationships. The objectives of this course are (1) to prepare students to successfully execute community engagement work with host organizations or local host communities, (2) to provide structure for their work in-country (3) to teach students how to reflect collaboratively and meaningfully on their learning experiences when they return. Through this method of preparation, implementation, and evaluation, students become more competent collaborative change-agents in their communities and institutions. Students reconvene at Northwestern to compare and contrast their experiences abroad and look ahead to next steps beyond the program. Applications accepted until March 1st. Please visit gesi.northwestern.edu to learn more and apply.

Summer 2017 Sec #1
06/12/17 - 08/20/17 MTuWThFSaSu 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Off Campus Open
Comparative Literature
For related classes, please see the departments of English, French, Italian, and Slavic Languages and Literature.
COMP_LIT 211-0 She-Monsters: Gender and Monstrosity in Greco-Roman Mythology

Many of the most well-known monsters from Classical antiquity are female: Medusa, the Sphinx, Sirens, Harpies, Furies, and Scylla. In this class, we will trace the “careers” of these monsters, from their earliest visual and textual attestations to their continuing fascination in modernity. We will explore when these figures achieved their forms and characteristics–for example Medusa her snake hair, the Sphinx her riddle–and discuss how modern texts and art works have shaped our idea of the ancient figures. Guiding us through the class will be the question of what precisely their monstrosity consists of–what makes them scary? Further, what is the relation between gender and monstrosity, does their scariness have a female quality to it?

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 1 – 3:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Communication Sciences and Disorders
CSD 301-DL Anatomy and Physiology of the Vocal Mechanism

This course covers anatomical and physiological mechanisms of breathing, phonation and articulation. Laboratories include dissection and participation in physiological research. The course is conducted completely online. It will be asynchronous; students can participate in discussions and complete assignments by working at their own pace, as long as deadlines are met. A technology fee will be added to tuition.
This course is restricted to students in the Prespeech Pathology program. Registration for this course will open late in May. 

Summer 2017 Sec #28 (301-DL)
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open
CSD 305-DL Phonetics

This course is an introduction to phonological analysis, dynamics of articulation and dialect variations, focusing on training in transcription of English speech sounds. The course is conducted completely online. It will be asynchronous; students can participate in discussions and complete assignments by working at their own pace, as long as deadlines are met. A technology fee will be added to tuition. 
This course is restricted to students in the Prespeech Pathology program. Registration for this course will open late in May.

Summer 2017 Sec #28 (305-DL)
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open
CSD 318-DL Introduction to Audiology

The course is an introduction to the measurement of hearing in humans, covering the basic anatomy of the ear, measurement of hearing, potential disorders of hearing. Lecture/laboratory. The course is conducted completely online. It will be asynchronous; students can participate in discussions and complete assignments by working at their own pace, as long as deadlines are met. A technology fee will be added to tuition.
This course is restricted to students in the Prespeech Pathology program. Registration for this course will open late in May.

Summer 2017 Sec #28 (318-DL)
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open
CSD 388-0 Attention Deficit Disorder and Related Behavior Disorders

An examination of the role of attentional processes in normal learning and a historical overview of the field of attention deficits. Diagnosis of attention deficit disorder, its primary symptoms, associated conditions, and etiologies. Consideration of a variety of treatment approaches including medication, family systems intervention, and social skills training.

This is an early, one week instensive course from 6/12-6/16/17.

Summer 2017 Sec #21
06/12/17 - 06/18/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
CSD 392-DL Language Development and Usage

This course covers the development of spoken and written language as it relates to child development, including phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic and pragmatic components. Cultural and individual linguistic diversity is also a focus. The course is conducted completely online. It will be asynchronous; students can participate in discussions and complete assignments by working at their own pace, as long as deadlines are met. A technology fee will be added to tuition.
This course is restricted to students in the Prespeech Pathology program. Registration for this course will open late in May.

Summer 2017 Sec #28 (392-DL)
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open
CSD 398-0 Research Practicum in Communication Science Disorder

Working with a faculty member on design, execution, and presentation of a research project. Activities may include a review of literature, design of an experiment, data collection, coding, analysis, and spoken or written presentation of experimental results.

Summer 2017 Sec #1
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Open
CSD 415-2 Clinical Study and Practicum in Audiology

TBA

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 TuTh noon – 1:45 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
CSD 415-6 Clinical Study and Practicum in Audiology

TBA

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 TuTh noon – 1:45 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
CSD 417-0 Noise and Its Effect on People

TBA

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 TuTh 8 – 9:45 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open
CSD 429-0 Evaluation and Treatment of Balance Disorders

Evaluation and treatment of individuals with balance disorders, including electrophysiologic evaluation of the vestibular system. Prerequisite: CSD 425 or permission of instructor.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 M 5 – 8:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
CSD 439-0 Management of Feeding Disorders in Infants and Toddlers

Developmental sequence of feeding skills in infants/toddlers; anatomy and physiology of swallowing, respiratory and gastrointestinal systems; psychological impact of feeding disorders; comparison of atypical oral sensory motor patterns, and feeding and swallowing behaviors across various pediatric disorders; treatment. Prerequisite: CSD 438-1.

This is an early, one week instensive course from 6/12-6/16/17.

Summer 2017 Sec #21
06/12/17 - 06/18/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
CSD 461-0 Augmentative and Alternative Communication

TBA

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 TuTh 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
CSD 462-0 Professional Issues in Speech Language

TBA

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 M 6 – 9:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
CSD 465-0 Hearing Impairment

Principles and practices in rehabilitation of children and adults, including use of sensory aids, counseling, and communication remediation, emphasizing speech reading, and auditory training techniques.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 TuTh 10 – 11:45 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open
CSD 465-DL Hearing Impairment

Principles and practices in rehabilitation of children and adults are covered in this course, including the use of sensory aids, counseling, and communication remediation, emphasizing speech reading and auditory training techniques. The course is conducted completely online. It will be asynchronous; students can participate in discussions and complete assignments by working at their own pace, as long as deadlines are met. A technology fee will be added to tuition.
This course is restricted to students in the Prespeech Pathology program. Registration for this course will open late in May.

Summer 2017 Sec #28 (465-DL)
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open
CSD 475-0 Advanced Clinical Methods l

TBA

Summer 2017 Sec #30
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Open
Economics
ECON 201-0 Introduction to Macroeconomics

Scarcity and choice; elements of demand and supply, determinants of aggregate output, employment, inflation, growth, and international balance of payments. Prerequisite: basic algebra and graphing. This course counts toward the Weinberg College social and behavioral sciences distribution requirement, Area III.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 MWF 1 – 2:50 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ECON 202-0 Introduction to Microeconomics

Consumers' and producers' influences on structure of output and prices and distribution of income. Social efficiency in resource allocation. Government impact on allocative efficiency and distributive equity. Prerequisite: ECON 201. This course counts toward the Weinberg College social and behavioral sciences distribution requirement, Area III.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 MWF 11 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ECON 281-0 Introduction to Applied Econometrics

Estimation and analysis of a variety of empirical econometric models. Descriptive statistics, univariate regression, multiple regression, simultaneous equations, and forecasting. Prerequisite: ECON 201, 202; MATH 220; STAT 210; or equivalent.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 MWF 1 – 2:50 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ECON 309-0 Public Finance

Theory and practice of public finance. Welfare aspects of taxation and public expenditure decisions. Budgeting, public investment, external costs and benefits, and public debt. Prerequisites: 281, 310-1,2.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 TuTh 3 – 4:50 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ECON 310-1 Microeconomics

Consumer behavior and the theory of demand; production, cost, supply functions; choices under uncertainty, insurance; competitive equilibrium; subsidies, taxes, price controls; monopoly and monopsony. Prerequisites: 201, 202, MATH 220.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 MWF 11 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ECON 310-2 Microeconomics

Price discrimination and public utility pricing; monopolistic competition, oligopoly, duopoly models; game theory; factor demands; general equilibrium theory and welfare economics; information theory; externalities and public goods. Prerequisite: 310-1.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ECON 311-0 Macroeconomics

Macroeconomics and monetary policy. Behavior of economy as a whole. Income, inflation, unemployment, and growth; consumption, investment, and rate of interest; monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisites: 201, 202, MATH 220.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 MWF 9 – 10:50 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ECON 330-0 Behavioral Economics

Understanding of how humans make choices in economic situations. Incorporation of psychology and/or sociology into economics. Topics may include perceptions, judgement, biases, and social pressure. Prerequisites: 281, 310-1,2.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 TuTh 6:30 – 8:20 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ECON 349-0 Industrial Economics

Price and efficiency performance of American industries representative of various types of market structures and practices. Prerequisites: 281, 310-1,2.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 MWF 3 – 4:50 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ECON 362-0 International Finance

Determination of exchange rates, balance of payments, and international asset flows and prices; international transmission of macroeconomic disturbances. Prerequisites: 281, 310-1, 311.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 MWF 9 – 10:50 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open
English

Composition courses ENGLISH 110 and ENGLISH 111 are only open to School of Professional Studies students and Visiting students. Please see English Requirements for information about prerequisites and placement exam procedures for these courses.

ENGLISH 105-0 Expository Writing

Expository Writing is designed for any student who wants a strong introductory course in college-level writing. Students write three essays, developing each through a process of planning, drafting, revising, and editing. Through this process, students learn techniques for writing essays that are clear, concise, interesting, and well-supported. Class meetings are conducted as seminar discussions and workshops.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 1 – 3:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ENGLISH 111-DL Writing Seminar II: The Pursuit of Happiness

Ever since we declared its pursuit as one of our inalienable rights, Americans have been hot on the trail of a happiness that often seems to be just beyond our grasp. The hunt takes many paths: finding love, wealth, or fame; earning an education, job, or lifestyle; attaining bliss, heaven, or a fairy tale ending. This writing class explores how we have defined, pursued and, at times, attained happiness. We ask the question: "is happiness a goal or a journey?" We examine how the ideal of happiness finds expression in our culture through philosophy, art, literature, music, and film. We also explore social phenomena such as the quest for higher education, the explosion of the self-help industry, and the ebb and flow of our consumer culture. The course is conducted completely online. It will be asynchronous; students can participate in discussions and complete assignments by working at their own pace, as long as deadlines are met. A technology fee will be added to tuition.

Summer 2017 Sec #20 (111-DL)
06/19/17 - 08/27/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open
ENGLISH 113-CN Introduction to Literature

Introduction to the vocabulary, techniques, and pleasures of literature through close study and discussion of poems, plays, short stories, and novels. Short critical papers develop ability to analyze and interpret literature. Prerequisite: ENGLISH 111 or equivalent writing skills highly recommended. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 Th 6 – 9:15 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open
ENGLISH 307-0 Writing the Novella


How might a long story or novella differ in structure and ambition from a shorter work? What is the nature of material that requires the relative expansiveness of a longer form, but not the breadth of a novel? In this class, students will plan and draft a long story or short novella of about 35¬¬–50 pages. Throughout the six weeks, students will read and discuss published models as points of departure for developing the form and substance of their own long work in installments. Portions of student work in progress will be workshopped. Novella proposals, readings, and drafting will be due in the first class. Be prepared to do a lot of writing, and to turn in work in every class.

Prerequisite: English 206 or Permission of Instructor.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ENGLISH 339-0 Shakespeare’s Status Updates

We think of status as changeable. Facebook lets us write statements summarizing our thoughts, moods, and activities, which we update and share multiple times a day to reflect different aspects of our lives and personalities. In Shakespeare's time, however, one's "status" was considered a more permanent "state" largely outside of individual control. A person's state was based on characteristics such as age, class, and gender, which dictated roles in the social hierarchy. We will read Shakespearean plays that pit these two senses of "status" against one another by staging characters that attempt to alter their own or others' social position. As characters court, sue, and cross-dress, we will consider the extent to which words and actions change their status, and those changes' consequences. We will then examine 21st-century film adaptations to ask how using educational institutions as the context for these plots alters or complicates their questions of status. Plays: Twelfth Night, Othello, The Taming of The Shrew Movies: She's the Man, O, Ten Things I Hate About You

This course fulfills the requirements for distribution area VI: Literature and Fine Arts

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 9:30 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
ENGLISH 368-0 Studies in 20th Century Literature: Literatures of Loneliness

Why is Don Draper always drinking alone in his office? American literature is filled with lonely figures like him, for whom the pursuit of happiness has led to isolation and impossibility. Working with novels, films, TV shows, pop songs, and poems, we’ll look at range of these lonely characters, asking: why are we attracted to them? What uncomfortable truths do they tell about our culture? And why are these figures (initially) always white and male? As the course proceeds, we’ll move past Don Draper and his lonely brethren, investigating how writers of color, queer writers, and feminist writers interrupt the literature of loneliness to tell their own stories. And we’ll think about the future of loneliness—how it continues to shape the stories we tell about ourselves and about our culture.

Texts include: Nelson Algren, The Man with the Golden Arm; Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man; James Baldwin, Giovanni’s Room; Adrienne Kennedy, “A Movie Star Has to Star in Black and White”; Joan Didion, Play it as it Lays; Eileen Myles, Chelsea Girls; Anne Garréta, Sphinx; Robert Kolker, A Cinema of Loneliness; Mad Men; Breathless; Taxi Driver; poems by Allen Ginsberg, Robert Lowell, John Berryman.

This course fulfills the requirements for distribution area VI: Literature and Fine Arts

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 W 6 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
ENGLISH 386-0 Studies in Literature & Film: Baseball in American Narrative

As cultural historian Jacques Barzun wrote, "Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball, the rules and realities of the game. . . ." Baseball functions in American culture as a compendium of narratives, an ongoing conversation about values and identity. From the Doubleday origin myth onwards, Americans have used baseball to grapple with two fundamental questions: what is America and who are Americans? This course will examine the different ways in which fiction writers, poets, essayists, artists, and filmmakers have used baseball as a metaphoric playing field to explore the conflicted construction of American identity. This course fulfills the requirements for distribution area VI: Literature and Fine Arts

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 12:30 – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Finance
FINANCE 202-CN Introduction to Finance

An introductory course covering the basic concepts and models used in finance, this Introduction to Finance course explores the mathematics and spreadsheet modeling techniques used in evaluating various financial assets, including stocks and bonds. It also surveys the risk-return tradeoff in financial markets and how investors gauge risk, in addition to the basic concepts of Markowitz's mean-variance portfolio theory. The nature and impact of interest-rate risk on financial institutions is considered, and the duration of a financial asset is introduced in this context. Introduces the efficient market hypothesis and its implications for personal investing and corporate finance. Please note: This course is makes use of blended learning, which requires students to engage in online discussions, activities and projects throughout the week. Students must have access to high speed Internet to enroll. Prerequisite: Math 101 or equivalent knowledge required, ACCOUNT 201 recommended. Carries business credit. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course. First class attendance is mandatory.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 M 6 – 9 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open
French
FRENCH 111-1 Elementary French

This course is for students who wish to complete all or part of the first year of college French. Any one of the three courses may be taken separately. The three-course sequence aims to build skills in speaking, understanding, writing, and reading French through study, practice, and class activities. Classes include a variety of activities designed to help students acquire knowledge of basic French vocabulary and structures along with the ability to use what they have learned in situations of communication. Classes are conducted in French except when explanation of grammar or other material may necessitate the use of English.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
FRENCH 111-2 Elementary French

French 111-2 is the second quarter of Elementary French. Class meets four days a week. The aim of the course is to build skills in speaking, listening, writing and reading French through study, practice, and class activities.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
07/10/17 - 07/30/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
FRENCH 111-3 Elementary French

This course is for students who wish to complete all or part of the first year of college French. Any one of the three courses may be taken separately. The three-course sequence aims to build skills in speaking, understanding, writing, and reading French through study, practice, and class activities. Classes include a variety of activities designed to help students acquire knowledge of basic French vocabulary and structures along with the ability to use what they have learned in situations of communication. Classes are conducted in French except when explanation of grammar or other material may necessitate the use of English.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
07/31/17 - 08/20/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
FRENCH 121-1 Intermediate French

For students who wish to complete all or part of the second year of college French. Any one of the three courses in this sequence may be taken separately. Using Le Français Internautique, an interactive online program, students review and practice basic grammar and improve their listening comprehension while exploring contemporary French culture. This first course in the sequence stresses oral communication and requires a minimum of two hours of work per day outside of class in the Multimedia Learning Center computer lab or on a computer with high-speed Internet access and a current browser. Classes are conducted in French. Prerequisite: first-year college French or equivalent.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
FRENCH 121-2 Intermediate French

For students who wish to complete all or part of the second year of college French. Any one of the three courses in this sequence may be taken separately. Using Le Français Internautique, an interactive online program, students review and practice basic grammar and improve their listening comprehension while exploring contemporary French culture. This first course in the sequence stresses oral communication and requires a minimum of two hours of work per day outside of class in the Multimedia Learning Center computer lab or on a computer with high-speed Internet access and a current browser. Classes are conducted in French. Prerequisite: first-year college French or equivalent.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
07/10/17 - 07/30/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
FRENCH 121-3 Intermediate French

French 121-3 is the third quarter of a three-quarter course for students who have completed French 121-2 or have been placed in that course by the French department. The aim of the course is to develop students' communication skills and cultural knowledge. Class meets four times a week. No P/N allowed.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
07/31/17 - 08/20/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
Music: Courses for Nonmajors
GEN_MUS 170-0 Introduction to Music

In this course, students will examine Western "art music," also referred to as "classical music." During the quarter, by exploring the history of the Western canon from the Medieval period to the present, and defining and discussing musical form and compositional techniques, students will acquire basic musical literacy and skills for critical listening. Furthermore, we will situate and dissect musical genres in their historical, political, and philosophical contexts in order to gather an understanding of history through music. Students should expect to prepare readings and listening assignments for discussion and to turn in two concert reports; there will also be listening quizzes and comprehensive midterm and final exams.

(VI. Literature and Fine Arts)

 

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 1 – 3:30 p.m. RCMA 1-160
Evanston Campus Open
GEN_MUS 175-0 Topics in Music: Music Festivals from Woodstock to Lollapalooza

Examining the social and musical place of historical and contemporary music festivals, this course asks questions about cultural place and musical performance. Beginning with historical festivals, such as Woodstock, Altamont, and the Newport Jazz/Folk Festivals, we will build on these events with a look toward the Chicago music festival scene - ranging from large paid festivals (e.g., Lollapolooza) to free neighborhood festivals (e.g., Grant Park Music Festival, Jazz Fest, or even Evanston's Summer Dance). How do we participate in the festival as a temporal music experience? How have increased costs and capital ventures changed the dialogue surrounding music festivals in the last 50 years? How do musicians and audiences experience festivals differently? The class will comprise lectures, readings, and discussion, as well as actual attendance, observation, and participation at local music festvals during the class term.

(VI. Literature and Fine Arts)

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 1 – 3:30 p.m. RCMA 1-160
Evanston Campus Open
GEN_MUS 176-0 Selected Topics in Applied Music: Pop Songwriting and Analysis

This class is divided into two main frameworks: analysis and songwriting. Students will learn compositional strategies by studying a variety of pop-influenced traditions. We will look in detail at songs by George Gershwin, Marvin Gaye, the Beatles, Pink Floyd, and Radiohead, among other influential artists. The acquisition of such analytical tools will enhance the students' songwriting abilities. Students will have the chance to present their compositions in class as a means to receive feedback from both the instructor and their colleagues. Projects include the composition of two songs as well as a short analytical presentation. Basic music background is welcomed but not required

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 1 – 3:30 p.m. RCMA 1-168
Evanston Campus Open
GEN_MUS 252-0 Harmony

An introduction to musicianship designed for the non-music major, this course explores the vocabulary and elements of tonal music through composition, performance, and analysis activities. While emphasis will be placed on harmonic structure and function, we will also discuss other factors that contribute to our enjoyment and understanding of a broad range of music, such as rhythm, meter, and melodic construction.

(II. Formal Studies)

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. RCMA 1-160
Evanston Campus Open
German
GERMAN 101-1 Beginning German

This is the intensive Summer Session Beginning German sequence. The class will meet 3 hours per day for five days a week. Each summer session comprises one full quarter of work. Students will receive a systematic introduction to basic German. All four language skills--speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing--are stressed to insure that students acquire a basic command of German. Classes are conducted in German, except when explanations of grammar or other material require the use of English. The language lab will be used to focus on pronunciation skills. Teaching Method: Class participation, group work, lab, lecture, listening exercises, readings and writing assignments Course Requirements and Evaluation Attendance, class participation, exams, group work, homework, lab, listening exercises, quizzes, readings, writing assignments

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MTuWThF 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
GERMAN 101-2 Beginning German

This is the intensive Summer Session Beginning German sequence. The class will meet 3 hours per day for five days a week. Each summer session comprises one full quarter of work. Students will receive a systematic introduction to basic German. All four language skills--speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing--are stressed to insure that students acquire a basic command of German. Classes are conducted in German, except when explanations of grammar or other material require the use of English. The language lab will be used to focus on pronunciation skills.

Summer 2017 Sec #21
07/10/17 - 07/30/17 MTuWThF 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
GERMAN 101-3 Beginning German

This is the intensive Summer Session Beginning German sequence. The class will meet 3 hours per day for five days a week. Each summer session comprises one full quarter of work. Students will receive a systematic introduction to basic German. All four language skills--speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing--are stressed to insure that students acquire a basic command of German. Classes are conducted in German, except when explanations of grammar or other material require the use of English. The language lab will be used to focus on pronunciation skills.

Summer 2017 Sec #22
07/31/17 - 08/20/17 MTuWThF 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
GERMAN 101-SA Beginning German

TBA

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/01/17 - 08/31/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Open
GERMAN 102-SA Intermediate German

TBA

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/01/17 - 08/31/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Open
GERMAN 105-0 German for Research

This course is designed for graduate students who wish to acquire competent reading skills in the German language, as well as the ability to translate from German to English. The course aims to provide participants with the basis for working with both primary and secondary literature. This course will revisit the elementary forms and constructions of German, reinforced and solidified with exercises, reading and translation assignments from literature, philosophy, history, as well as current events. Over the course of the summer, we will work with shorter works and selections from Kafka, Nietzsche, Brecht, Marx, Freud, and Heidegger, amongst others. Teaching Method Class participation, group work, lecture, readings, writing assignments Course Requirements and Evaluation Attendance, class participation, group work, homework, readings, writing assignments NB: This is a non-graded course and evaluations are used solely to indicate individual progress. In addition to regular translation assignments there will be a final project consisting of the translation of an article or a chapter of a book in the participant’s field.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
GERMAN 205-SA Focus Writing

TBA

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/01/17 - 08/31/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Open
GERMAN 222-SA German History from 1789-1989

TBA

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/01/17 - 08/31/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Open
Gender Studies
GNDR_ST 371-0 Lesbian Representation in Popular Culture from the 1980s to the Present

In the introduction to the Complete Dykes to Watch Out For, Alison Bechdel remembers starting her long-running comic strip out of a desire to see her community of queer women represented in popular culture. Despite the upswing in the presence of lesbian characters in the television, films, and novels of the past twenty years or so, the difficulty of representing queer women persists. This class will trace queer women’s media representation from Bechdel’s Dykes to Watch Out For to the present. What tropes or trends tend to be invoked in the representation of the lesbian, bisexual, transgender, or queer woman? How do these tropes differ when the creator is queer versus when he or she is not? How do race and class intersect with queer women’s representation? To answer some of these questions, we will examine a range of material. In addition to Bechdel’s early comics, we will examine novels (Eileen Myles’ Chelsea Girls; Octavia Butler’s Fledgling), film (Personal Best, Carol) television (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, The L Word, Orange is the New Black). Additionally, we will engage with the queer pop culture commentary and community website Autostraddle alongside scholarly articles and theory on queer representation in the media.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
History
HISTORY 200-0 Latina/o Migration Politics in the United States

This course explores Latinas/os’ contributions to social and political movements by focusing on migration experiences of Latino immigrant groups and their struggles for equality and inclusion. The main goals of this course are to introduce students to the history of Latina/o’s civic and political activism and to trace the development of immigrant rights activism in the twentieth century. This course analyzes Latina/o stories ranging from immigrant workers to the experiences of temporary guest workers, such as Braceros; it evaluates various Latino interest and civil groups, as well as new forms of activism like the Dreamers’ campaigns. It also places immigrant rights activism in the context of other social and civil rights movements in the United States. To this purpose, it considers, Latinas/os’ struggles for inclusion, such as bilingual education, fair labor practices for immigrant workers, equal opportunities, and immigration reform. While focused on the migration stories, these often overlap with legal and political history in the United States. By exploring this interplay between the law and migration we can relate local and regional stories to national policies and federal immigration legislation, which have shaped Latino migration politics. Ultimately, this course charts Latino/a fights and setbacks for inclusion and equality in the United States

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 TuTh 2 – 4:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
HISTORY 201-1 European Civilization: High Medieval thru mid-18th C

This course is a survey of the major events and developments in pre-industrial European history. It takes students from the age of the Crusades to the eve of the French Revolution, a period of tremendous transformation which set the stage for modernity. We will look at the major themes of European history during the period—high medieval culture, the Renaissance, the Reformation, the emergence of modern science, colonies and commerce, changes in political and military structures, and the Enlightenment. There will be a heavy emphasis on primary sources and the how historical narratives are constructed to help us understand the evolution of ideas and institutions in European history. We will pay particular attention to how Europeans forged a common culture, how that culture survived religious and political divisions, and how interactions with the rest of the world shaped Europe’s own history.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College historical studies distribution requirement, Area IV.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 1 – 3:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
HISTORY 210-2 History of the United States: Reconstruction to the Present

This course will explore major themes of U.S. history since the end of the Civil War by looking backwards from the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Students will critically engage the intersection between politics and culture through primary sources and secondary readings. We will examine the history of the issues that the U.S. grappled with during the 2016 election and the first months of the Trump administration, such as: white supremacy, populism, immigration, blackness, multiculturalism, feminism and anti-feminism, anti-black violence and mass incarceration, wealth and capital in the U.S., and sexuality and LGBTQ rights. Students will learn how these forces continue to shape U.S. society and to analyze how media and politicians utilize historical narratives to explain current politics.


Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
HISTORY 300-0 New Lectures in History: American Environmental History in the 20th c.

This course is designed to explore the history of environmental issues and changing attitudes toward the environment from the late 19th century into the 21st century. Several key issues will inform our understanding of American environmental history: the reciprocal relationship between humanity and the environment; the social construction of “nature” and environmental knowledge; and the role of race, class, gender, and other social dynamics in mediating interactions between people and the natural world. Students will have an opportunity to learn about the environmental effects of important themes in US history, including industrialization, consumption, urbanization, suburbanization, market economies, warfare, energy extraction, and new technologies. Furthermore, they will explore key moments in American environmental history, including the rise of the conservation/preservation movements; the development of environmental science; the growth of the environmental movement; and the implications of environmental policy.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 2 – 4:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
HISTORY 316-0 The Sixties

“Years of hope, days of rage.” The Sixties remain one of the most studied and controversial time periods in United States history. Characterized by many as a time of Civil Rights, Free Speech, and the Sexual Revolution, this period also brought us the Vietnam War, the New Right, and the waning power of industrial unions. Moreover, historians continue to debate when the period known as "the Sixties” actually began and ended. Born out of a postwar period of expanding national expectation, the Sixties gave birth to our modern “culture wars" and continue to mean different things to all those who experienced or examine them. Through political, social, and cultural history, this course will explore the causes, content, and consequences of the period’s many paradoxes. It will demonstrate how unresolved tensions in what scholars have called the “liberal consensus” in turn set the stage for the “rise of the Right” and “Age of Reagan.” Finally, we will evaluate why the history of this period remains so influential.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/18/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
HISTORY 325-0 History of American Technology

Since the early days of the republic, Americans have marveled at the rapid pace of technological change around them, and have grappled with how to understand and define themselves in the face of a seemingly unending array of life-altering technological developments. From the rise of factories in the early 19th century to the space program in the 1960s to today’s world of handheld devices and social media, generation after generation has witnessed innovations that seem to shake the world. But has technology driven change in American society, or have the characteristics, politics, laws, and beliefs of American society driven technological change? In this course, we will explore these questions by examining key technologies through the ages, from the steam engine to the smartphone, and we will explore where these objects came from and how society has absorbed and debated them. We will analyze, through lectures and discussions, what technology has brought to bear on questions of progress, nationalism, capitalism, environmentalism, and feminism, and will learn how these ideas have taken different forms through time — including our own. We will explore how the society we live in today has been shaped by the technological debates of the past, and, in light of today’s globalized and interconnected world, pose a fundamental question: can technologies truly be “national” in character?

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 2 – 4:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
HISTORY 362-3 Modern British History, 1900-Present

This course will explore how Britain went from being the global imperial power at the start of the 20th century to championing a “little Britain” with the Brexit vote in 2016. Along the way, we will ask whether the 20th century was really a period of decline for Britain, learn about decolonization, the rise of the welfare state, the impact of the World Wars on British life and politics, and think about how race and class and helped to shape the Modern Britain of today.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 2 – 4:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Cancelled
HISTORY 392-0 Topics in History:The Cultural Cold War, 1945-1989

When ideological tensions flared between the United States and Soviet Union after World War Two, the world braced for another major military conflict. Although a series of political and military crises ensued, the Cold War was largely fought in the realm of culture. Students will explore how film, dance, and sports became weapons of war during this quest for ideological and cultural superiority. This course will cover the Americanization of Postwar Europe, the Red Scare and Containment, the fear of mutually-assured destruction, the long-term effects of “the Thaw,” and the dissolution of the Soviet Union while searching for insight into the period from films like The Day the Earth Stood Still, Dr. Strangelove, and Rambo. Dance diplomacy and historic Olympic match-ups between American and Soviet athletes will also inform the ways in which we assess the experience and outcome of the Cold War. Ultimately, this course offers an explanation of the major currents of the Cold War while introducing students to the methods used by cultural historians.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Italian
ITALIAN 101-1 Elementary Italian

This three-course sequence in elementary Italian covers a full year of the language. At the end of the sequence, students are able to ask and answer simple questions in Italian, write a grammatically correct sentence, and follow the drift of a simple conversation. The emphasis is on person-to-person communication. Students build grammar skills by working on simple situations - greetings, introductions, asking directions - that grow in complexity as the course proceeds. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian and include a wide range of exercises, small-group projects, video, and Internet sites. Students also gain knowledge of fundamental aspects of Italian culture, history, and geography. Weinberg students with some experience in Italian may take an exam to place out of any or all of the first-year sequence. Courses may be taken individually (subject to prerequisites) or in sequence.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
ITALIAN 101-2 Elementary Italian

This three-course sequence in elementary Italian covers a full year of the language. At the end of the sequence, students are able to ask and answer simple questions in Italian, write a grammatically correct sentence, and follow the drift of a simple conversation. The emphasis is on person-to-person communication. Students build grammar skills by working on simple situations - greetings, introductions, asking directions - that grow in complexity as the course proceeds. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian and include a wide range of exercises, small-group projects, video, and Internet sites. Students also gain knowledge of fundamental aspects of Italian culture, history, and geography. Weinberg students with some experience in Italian may take an exam to place out of any or all of the first-year sequence. Courses may be taken individually (subject to prerequisites) or in sequence.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
07/10/17 - 07/30/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
ITALIAN 101-3 Elementary Italian

A beginning course in Italian language and culture, Elementary Italian develops the four basic language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) while introducing students to Italy and its people. At the end of full-year Italian 101 sequence, students will be able to ask and answer simple questions in Italian, write grammatically correct sentences, and follow the drift of simple conversations. Students will gain knowledge of fundamental aspects of Italian culture, history, and geography. This course is the first in a three-part sequence for beginning students of Italian. Italian 101-1 will be offered at the beginning of the academic year (fall), followed by 101-2 (winter) and 101-3 (spring). Classes are conducted entirely in Italian and are very lively, with lots of give-and-take among participants. Students with some experience in Italian may take the online placement test to place out of any or all of the first-year sequence.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
07/31/17 - 08/20/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
Japanese
JAPANESE 111-1 Japanese l

In Japanese I (JAPANESE 111-1 ) students will develop the four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing and learn many aspects of Japanese culture and society through various in-class activities, written assignments, and video viewing. Careful and thorough review and preparation for each class session are required. Upon the satisfactory completion of the course, the students will be able to greet, introduce themselves, describe their families and friends, discuss their daily routines and experiences, and write letters to teachers and friends. This course is conducted mostly in Japanese, and class hours are spent mainly on oral development. Written assignments are given for reading and writing development. Students are expected to spend at least 3 hours on studying for this course outside of the classroom everyday. Pre-Requisite: High School students can register for the course if their status is rising seniors.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MTuWThF 10 – 11:50 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Journalism
Journalism courses are open to all students; however, Northwestern day school students must obtain their dean's approval to enroll in these courses. Journalism laboratory courses JRN WRIT 201-A and JRN WRIT 380 may not be audited.
JRN_WRIT 201-A Writing for Media

This course focuses on fundamental journalistic writing techniques -- skills that work well in any academic or vocational setting and result in clear, crisp, concise writing. By blending in-class meetings with remote-site interactive instruction (online sessions), students develop capability to compose quickly and meet real-world deadlines. Office hours will be online and available during week. They are also available prior to each class meeting and by appointment. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 M 6 – 9 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open
Linguistics
LING 260-0 Formal Analysis of Words and Sentences

In this course we will examine the formal structure of sentences in natural language. We will analyze data from a variety of languages (but especially English) in order to construct a theory of syntax. The goal will be to build a (partial) model of the (speaker's internal) grammar and at the same time to determine what aspects of that grammar might be universal (true of all languages). The primary focus of this class is on learning how to do syntax. You will learn terminology, facts, and a particular theory of syntax, but more importantly, the aim is for you to learn the basic concepts, skills, methodology, and analytical and abstract thinking that are necessary to do formal linguistics.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
07/24/17 - 08/27/17 MW 2 – 5 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Mathematics
MATH 220-0 Differential Calculus of One-Variable Functions

Elements of differential and integral calculus. Definition of a function; trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, and inverse functions; graphs, limits, continuity, derivative of a function, product, quotient and chain rule, implicit differentiation, linear approximation and differentials, related rates, mean value theorems, curve plotting, optimization problems, Newton's method, and antiderivatives. Taken consecutively, 220 and 224 are equivalent to two-thirds of a year in calculus. Prerequisite: three years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 MW 1 – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MATH 224-0 Integral Calculus of One-Variable Functions

Elements of differential and integral calculus. Integral calculus in one variable. Definite integrals and the fundamental theorems of calculus. Techniques of integration, including integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitutions, partial fractions, numerical integration, and improper integrals. Applications of integration; computation of volumes, arc length, average value of functions. The mean value theorem for integration, work, and probability. Sequences and series; the integral and comparison tests, power series, ratio test, introduction to Taylor's formula, Taylor series, and using the series to solve differential equations. Taken consecutively, MATH 220 and 224 are equivalent to two-thirds of an academic year in calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 220 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 TuTh 1 – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MATH 230-0 Differential Calculus of Multivariable Functions

Vectors, dot and cross products, equations of lines and planes; polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates; differentiation of vector functions; velocity and acceleration, arc length, parametric surfaces, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, tangent plane and linear approximations, chain rule for partial derivatives, directional derivative and gradient, max-min problems for functions of several variables, Lagrange multipliers. Prerequisite: MATH 224-0 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 MW 3 – 5 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MATH 234-0 Multiple Integration and Vector Calculus

Cylindrical and spherical coordinates, double and triple integrals, line and surface integrals. Change of variables in multiple integrals; gradient, divergence, and curl. Theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes. Prerequisite: 230. Students may not receive credit for both 234 and 281-1, 285-3, 290-3, or 291-3. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 TuTh 3 – 5 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MATH 240-0 Linear Algebra

Basic concepts of linear algebra. Solutions of systems of linear equations; vectors and matrices; subspaces, linear independence, and bases; determinants; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; other topics and applications as time permits. Math 230-0 or its equivalent is prerequisite for Math 240-0. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 MW 10 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
MATH 300-0 Foundations of Higher Mathematics

Introduction to fundamental mathematical ideas such as sets, functions, equivalence relations, and cardinal numbers and to basic techniques of writing proofs. Prerequisite: MATH 240. This course may not be taken for credit after MATH 320-1, 321-1, 330-1, or 331-1 without prior departmental consent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/27/17 TuTh 10 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
MATH 334-0 Linear Algebra II: Second Course

Abstract theory of vector spaces and linear transformations. Complex vector spaces, unitary and Hermitian matrices. Jordan canonical form. Selected applications as time permits. Students who took 330-1 (formerly 337-1) prior to 2004-05 may not also take 334 for credit toward the major without departmental consent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 TuTh 7 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Marketing
MKTG 201-DL Marketing I: Principles of Marketing

Marketing structure and processes whereby products proceed from the place of production to final use or consumption. Sales management, retailing, foreign trade, advertising, channels of distribution for marketing different types of products, activities of wholesale and retail middlemen and other important marketing institutions, cooperative marketing, market risk, sources of marketing information, price determination, governmental activity related to marketing, cost of marketing, and general critique of market structure.

Summer 2017 Sec #25 (201-DL)
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open
MKTG 320-CN Brand Management

Some of the most valuable assets managed by companies today are the brand names associated with their products and services. Strong brands can influence purchase decisions by communicating the value of and providing differentiation for products and services. Effective brand management is critical to maintaining the long-term profitability of products and services.
This course is designed to develop students’ understanding of the importance of brand equity as well as how to build, measure and manage brand equity. Topics will include understanding brands from the customer’s perspective, building brand equity, measuring brand equity, leveraging brand equity, managing brand portfolios and managing brands over time.

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 M 6:15 – 9:15 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open
Education: Master of Science in Education
For information about the Master of Science in Education program and admission procedures, please contact the School of Education and Social Policy at 847/467-1458.
MS_ED 402-0 Social Contexts of Education

This course will explore the ways in which students’ social and cultural contexts intersect with their educational experiences. Most of the available research to-date has investigated race/ethnicity, social class, and gender as the identifying characteristics of students with important implications for educational access, success and learning. However, these are not the only contexts with educational implications, and I would welcome contributions to the class (written or oral) that expand our understanding of other student contexts (examples include disability, language, religion, or sexuality). This course looks across educational domains and draws connections between the K-12 and undergraduate educational settings. The parallels are abundant as social policies increasingly address the notion of a seamless K-16 educational system. The format of the course will consist of large group lecture/discussion for the first 60-90 minutes each week, followed by small group discussions led by myself or TAs for the remainder of the class time.

NOTE: Open to professional educators.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 7 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MS_ED 405-0 Child and Adolescent Development

The course provides an overview of developmental concepts from birth through adolescence. It also examines the interplay of biological factors, individual differences, cultural experiences and relationships among cognitive, social, emotional, and cultural aspects of development and learning. Class participants will study major developmental theories and contexts of the construction of these theories as well as the implications for teaching, learning, and the classroom environment.

NOTE: Open to professional educators

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 7 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MS_ED 410-0 Foundations of Learning in a New Language

TBA

 

NOTE: Open to professional educators

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 2 – 4 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MS_ED 414-0 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers

TBA

NOTE: Open to professional educators

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 Tu noon – 4 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MS_ED 422-0 Teaching Reading in the Content Area

This course is designed to help middle school and high school teachers develop an understanding of specific strategies that readers must use to achieve deep comprehension of content material. We will explore cognitive foundations of reading comprehension and their influence on methods of instruction and assessment, as well as the interrelationships among reading processes and language learning. Theory and practice relationships will be explored as students experience and learn about: text structure, use of background knowledge, comprehension connections, inferencing, strategies for active engagement, socio-cultural influences on reading, reading/writing relationships, text sets, and assessment of content reading. As a methods course, we will also discuss the elements of good teaching, the theory and history of teaching, curriculum design, instructional methods, and the developmental needs of adolescents.

 NOTE: Open to professional educators.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 4:30 – 6:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MS_ED 427-0 Educating Exceptional Children

Exceptional children have unique characteristics - physiological, intellectual, and social-emotional. This course examines these characteristics and etiological factors, as well as trends in legislation, educational programming and approaches to instruction for students with disabilities. NOTE: Open to professional educators.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 4:30 – 6:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MS_ED 430-0 Topics in Teaching & Learning; Seminar on Interpretive Discussion

The goal of the course is explore the theory and practice of interpretive discussion--discussion that aims to identify questions about the meaning of texts and pursue their resolution through group conversation. The course specifically focuses on discussion preparation, discussion leading, and reflection. Course participants are asked to lead discussions both in and outside of class, and to share video of their discussion leading with class members. Intended for graduate students (MA, MS, Ph.D) and teachers.

NOTE: Open to professional educators

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 Th noon – 4 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MS_ED 437-0 Curriculum Design and Implementation

The course provides an overview of various approaches to curriculum design and instructional models, as well as the impact of both on student learning, classroom climate, and school culture. The history and theory of curriculum and instruction will be touched upon before delving deeply into specific current models with an emphasis on leading teams of teachers and school-wide efforts.

Open to professional educators with 3 or more years of teaching experience.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 4:30 – 6:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MS_ED 439-0 Leading with Technology

Technology is a powerful educational tool both inside and outside the classroom. In this course, students will study how effective educational leaders use technology to improve organization, communication, and classroom instruction at both the micro and macro level. This course, intended for individuals with at least three years of teaching experience, is designed for those seeking to take up leadership roles in education, e.g. department chairs, instructional coaches, principals, and educational technology coordinators. Instruction will be based on current research in the field of educational technology and will include hands-on opportunities for students to become familiar with individual technologies and behaviors to support leadership. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to utilize various technologies to enhance their leadership and support 21st century instruction at their schools..

Open to professional educators with 3 or more years of teaching experience.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 4:30 – 6:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MS_ED 461-0 Formative and Summative Assessment,

The course covers the use of formative and benchmark assessments for K-12 teachers to diagnose and redesign learning opportunities for students. It also focuses on measurement topics related to understanding validity and reliability as well as the use of data to inform instruction. In addition, teachers learn techniques for using formative classroom assessments to inform instruction.

NOTE: Open to professional educators

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 7 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Music Technology
MUS_TECH 322-0 Recording Techniques

The class will look in detail at microphone design and placement techniques, covering stereo miking; close and distant miking of voices, acoustic instruments, and ensembles; and “source” recording for sound design and musique concrète applications. The class will also introduce practical issues related to field and studio recording and a variety of fundamental audio concepts including signal flow, console design, word clock, time code, dynamics processing, and effects processing. Students will make their own recordings using the techniques discussed in class with the goal of producing professional-quality projects. The course is open to both music majors and non-majors.

Summer 2017 Sec #23
06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MTuWThF 10 – 11:50 a.m. RCMA Lower Level 121
Evanston Campus Open
Music: Master Classes, Symposia, and Workshops

MUSIC: PERFORMANCE INSTITUTES, MASTER CLASSES, SEMINARS, SYMPOSIA AND WORKSHOPS

Registration for Bienen School of Music Summer Performance Institutes, Master Classes, Seminars, Symposia and Workshops, either for credit or non-credit, must be done through the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music Office of Admission, Financial Aid and Enrollment. All tuition amounts listed are for non-credit registration. There is an additional charge for registering for any performance program for university credit. For registration materials and special instructions, contact the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music Office of Admission, Financial Aid and Enrollment at 847-491-3141 or summermusic@northwestern.edu.

Applications for Bienen School of Music Summer Performance Institutes, Master Classes, Seminars, Symposia and Workshops must be submitted via the Audition Dropbox, located on the Bienen School website at www.music.northwestern.edu/academics/summer-session.

Upon creating a file in the Dropbox, applicants should select “Visiting Student (Summer Session)” as their application type, and then select the workshop to which you are applying. This will ensure that your file is distributed to the correct reviewers. No separate application form is necessary--do not submit an application to Northwestern University via the Common Application or Graduate Music Online Application. Applicants will be asked to upload a detailed resume as well as all audition requirements for the performance offerings. NOTE: No paper applications will be accepted. Do not mail recordings to the Bienen School of Music or to faculty, as these will not be reviewed or returned.

Detailed audition requirements, deadlines and participation dates for all Summer Performance Offerings can be found online at www.music.northwestsern.edu/academics/summer-session.

Applications submitted via the Audition Dropbox will be reviewed in a timely manner. Students who are accepted to participate in a performance program will be notified via email, and will receive payment deadline information, enrollment paperwork, and other admission materials. Participation in a performance program is not guaranteed until full payment has been received by the Bienen School of Music.

Please note that auditors to summer Performance Programs are not required to apply, but we encourage you register in advance by emailing summermusic@northwestern.edu to ensure you have a seat in the class.

The offering of any summer program is dependent on a minimum number of registered participants and subject to cancellation if the required registration does not materialize by the registration deadlines.

MUSIC 310-0 Performance Practicum: Conducting and Wind Music Symposium

Taught by Mallory Thompson, Director of Bands at Northwestern University and Steven Davis, professor of conducting and conductor of the Conservatory Wind Symphony at the University of Missouri-Kansas City’s Conservatory of Music and Dance, the symposium is designed to enhance your conducting, teaching and musical skills. Participants will be sent a list of scores to prepare in advance, and the repertoire will include a variety of works for ensembles of various levels. Works to be studied include established masterworks as well as new music for winds. In addition to conducting a live ensemble and receiving feedback from the faculty, participants will attend lectures and discussions on choosing repertoire, score study, rehearsal techniques, movement, and interpretation. The symposium is recommended for conductors of all levels with a desire to learn and explore new ideas. Preference will be given to those with a completed bachelor's degree and some experience. There are two ways to participate in the workshop: as a participant (conduct eight times in the week) or as an auditor (conduct four times in the week).

Detailed audition requirements, deadlines and participation dates for all Summer Performance Offerings can be found online at www.music.northwestsern.edu/academics/summer-session.


Additional Information:

Workshop schedule is M/T/W/TH/F 8am-5pm; SU 4pm-8pm

Summer 2017 Sec #24


Schedule Notes:


07/09/17 - 07/14/17 MTuWThF
Sunday
8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
4-8pm
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 310-0 Performance Practicum: Trombone Master Classes

This summer trombone workshop will feature an exhaustive exposure to fundamentals, training for orchestral auditions, master classes focusing on the interpretation of solo literature, and chamber music performance. Michael Mulcahy appears around the globe as a soloist and teacher. He has led Northwestern's trombone studio since 1999 and his students occupy major positions in orchestras worldwide, including the Boston Symphony Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony and the Berlin Philharmonic. A member of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra since 1989, Mulcahy is also principal trombone with Chicago's Music of the Baroque and the Grand Teton Music Festival. Previously he was principal trombone with Australia's Tasmanian Symphony and Melbourne Symphony and solo trombone with the Cologne Radio Symphony.

 

Detailed audition requirements, deadlines and participation dates for all Summer Performance Offerings can be found online at www.music.northwestsern.edu/academics/summer-session.

Summer 2017 Sec #23


Schedule Notes:


06/25/17 - 07/02/17 MTuWThF
Friday
9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
9:30am-1:30pm
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 310-0 Performance Practicum: Guitar Workshop

This intensive six-day program is designed to develop strong technical ability, advanced musical skills, thorough knowledge of repertoire and healthy practice habits. Students will participate in master classes, ensembles, technique classes and private lessons. The six-day workshop will culminate in a concert of student solo and ensemble performances. Guitar Workshop faculty will include Anne Waller, Senior Lecturer in Guitar, Northwestern University Bienen School of Music; Mark Maxwell, Coordinator of Guitar Studies, DePaul University School of Music and Guitar Instructor, Northwestern Music Academy; and Oscar Ghiglia, internationally renowned concert artist and Professor emeritus of the Basel Music Akademie.

 

Detailed audition requirements, deadlines and participation dates for all Summer Performance Offerings can be found online at www.music.northwestsern.edu/academics/summer-session.

Summer 2017 Sec #20


Schedule Notes:


06/17/17 - 06/23/17 MTuWTh
Sa 12-4pm
9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Su 10am-5pm
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 310-0 Performance Practicum: Percussion Symposium

Distinguished percussionists from New York Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Cleveland Orchestra, Boston Symphony, Seattle Symphony, and many more will gather at this Percussion "Think Tank" to discuss styles, sound productions, listening sessions, body movements, strokes, brain in music, memorization, performing, delivery, physical execution, practicing, auditions, instruments and daily technical lab classes on all percussion instruments and performances in master classes

 Detailed audition requirements, deadlines and participation dates for all Summer Performance Offerings can be found online at www.music.northwestsern.edu/academics/summer-session.

 

Summer 2017 Sec #27


Schedule Notes:


07/31/17 - 08/05/17 MTuWThFSa 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 310-0 Performance Practicum: A Vocal Career Seminar

This career seminar will consist of lectures and master classes with international opera singer Pamela Hinchman, associate professor of voice at Northwestern University and colleagues from around the world. In these classes, you will learn how to audition for an agent, an opera company, and a musical theater company. The seminar will identify pieces that will make you your most marketable product and then help you to perfect them. Additionally, these sessions will address how a singer can most effectively create a dynamic résumé and bio, give advice on the proper photo for your voice type, and provide a marketing strategy. Bodywork and acting classes as well as guidance from vocal health specialists will aid the singer in remain healthy throughout their career. Scenes from operas and music theater will round out the week and will be performed on Friday evening. Guest speakers may include a New York agent for opera and musical theater, a photographer, an opera conductor and a stage director. Space is limited so early submission of participant applications is advisable. A special section has been added for high school students interested in exploring what it would be like to have a career on the stage. In addition to coachings and performances, they will begin to develop skills in preparation for college auditions for both music theater and classical vocal study.

 

Detailed audition requirements, deadlines and participation dates for all Summer Performance Offerings can be found online at www.music.northwestsern.edu/academics/summer-session.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
07/24/17 - 07/30/17 MTuWThF 2 – 10:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 310-0 Trumpet Seminar

This summer trumpet seminar will feature an extensive exposure to fundamentals, and master classes focusing on the solo, etude and orchestral excerpt literature for trumpet. Each participant will be required to prepare at least one solo, two etudes and 4 orchestra excerpts. Participants will perform in daily masterclasses, as well as in the final day participant recital.

 

Detailed audition requirements, deadlines and participation dates for all Summer Performance Offerings can be found online at www.music.northwestsern.edu/academics/summer-session.

Summer 2017 Sec #22
06/25/17 - 07/02/17 MTuWThF 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 310-0 Duo Sonata Master Class

Open to college and graduate students, young professionals, serious amateurs, advanced high-school students. Intensive master classes for strings and piano will focus on the art of playing duo sonatas as equal partners. Participants will have the opportunity to work on interpretive concepts, style and balance, as well as a comprehensive understanding of the musical score, and will bring each sonata up to performance level. They will also be encouraged to develop their critical faculties in listening and score study. There is ample time in the daily schedule for individual practice and rehearsals.

 

Detailed audition requirements, deadlines and participation dates for all Summer Performance Offerings can be found online at www.music.northwestsern.edu/academics/summer-session.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
07/10/17 - 07/16/17 MTuWThF
Sa
10:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
3-9pm
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 310-0 Voice Institute

The Institute will be an exposé and application of the principles discussed in "The Naked Voice: A Holistic Approach to Singing" by W. Stephen Smith (Oxford University Press, 2007) for singers and voice teachers. For the singers it will include private lessons, master classes, acting classes, dramatic coachings, and a performance of opera scenes. For the teachers it will include five two-hour seminars on voice technique and pedagogy in a lecture/master class format along with the opportunity to participate in the acting classes and to observe the singers' private lessons and master classes. Lessons, master classes, and seminars will be taught by W. Stephen Smith. Acting classes, dramatic coachings, and scene staging will be by Gene Roberts. Singers should have completed at least three years of collegiate level training. Teachers should have collegiate level voice teaching experience. Space is limited to 10 singers and 10 teachers.

 

Detailed audition requirements, deadlines and participation dates for all Summer Performance Offerings can be found online at www.music.northwestsern.edu/academics/summer-session.

Summer 2017 Sec #21
06/17/17 - 06/23/17 MTuWThFSaSu 10 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 320-0 Performance Workshop: Violin Institute

The Summer Violin Institute is an intensive two-week program that offers participants the opportunity to work with renowned violin faculty. The master class format provides a unique environment for students to receive individual instruction while also benefiting from knowledge imparted to the group in a collective setting. The program is designed to develop strong technical ability, advanced musical skills, thorough knowledge of repertoire and healthy practice habits. Students will participate in a variety of master classes, technique classes and performances.

 

Detailed audition requirements, deadlines and participation dates for all Summer Performance Offerings can be found online at www.music.northwestsern.edu/academics/summer-session.

Audition requirements: A digital audio recording including the first movement of a Violin Concerto from the standard repertoire and the first movement of a Bach solo Sonata or Partita (10 minutes total).

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/26/17 - 07/07/17 MTuWThF
Sa 10:30am-4pm
10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Su 8:30am-2:30pm
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 333-0 Performance Practicum: Summer Oboe Workshop

This intensive three-day program is designed to create a more comprehensive knowledge of the most important aspects of oboe playing and reed making. Students will participate in master classes and some private instruction. The three-day workshop will culminate in a faculty concert. Oboe Workshop faculty will include Robert Morgan, Michael Henoch and Scott Hostetler, all members of the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music oboe faculty.

 

Detailed audition requirements, deadlines and participation dates for all Summer Performance Offerings can be found online at www.music.northwestsern.edu/academics/summer-session.

Summer 2017 Sec #21


Schedule Notes:


07/10/17 - 07/16/17 FSaSu 9:30 a.m. – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 333-0 Performance Workshop, Three Day - Horn Symposium

This intensive three-day program will feature master classes and recitals given by Gail Williams, Jon Boen and performance psychologist Don Greene. Additionally, participants can attend a series of workshops focused on the various elements involved in achieving their peak performance. These workshops will include a discussion of music fundamentals, practicing techniques, meditation, posture, and much more. The symposium program is designed to be relevant to both music students and professionals with a special focus for teachers on how to incorporate these elements into their own teaching. Although this symposium has been planned by Northwestern Horn Faculty, Professors Williams and Boen, it is certainly relevant to other brass players and musicians.

 

Detailed audition requirements, deadlines and participation dates for all Summer Performance Offerings can be found online at www.music.northwestsern.edu/academics/summer-session.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 06/25/17 SaSu
F
9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
12pm-5:30pm
Evanston Campus Open
Music Education
MUSIC_ED 451-0 Topics in Teaching and Learning

TBA

Summer 2017 Sec #20
07/17/17 - 08/31/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Organization Behavior
ORG_BEH 301-CN Organization Behavior

The interaction of individuals in formal organizations. Theory and research integrated with cases and exercises to develop understanding of the dynamics of motivation, communication, group decision making, leadership, intergroup relations, power, and conflict. Students are encouraged to apply this knowledge to managing relationships with superiors, subordinates, and colleagues in their own work settings. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 6 – 8:30 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open
ORG_BEH 307-CN Leadership Principles

Leadership is one of the most common words used in business conversations. Understanding how to develop leadership competency at the institutional, team, and individual levels is key to success. The goal of this course is to help students define their own vision of leadership within the context of proven leadership strategies in order to be more effective in their professional roles. Topics include leadership competency frameworks; development strategies; the role of team; feedback; communication and change management. Case studies, in-class discussions, and group interaction are used to stimulate self-discovery and to experience leadership issues firsthand. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. Students must have ready access to the Internet. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course. First class attendance is mandatory.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 W 6 – 9 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open
ORG_BEH 367-DL Strategic Management

This course applies the concepts of strategic planning to various types of organizations. Initial discussions will provide a basic framework for preparing a strategic plan for corporations, non-profits and government agencies. Practical applications will be developed from case studies and the experiences of the instructor and students. Since we can learn from wide range of situational discussions, we will consider entrepreneurial and established operations, as well as success stories and failures.

Summer 2017 Sec #25 (367-DL)
07/24/17 - 08/27/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open
ORG_BEH 395-CN Practicum

TBA. This course will meet 6/24, 7/8, 7/22, 8/5, and 8/26.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 08/20/17 Sa 1 – 4 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Performance Studies
PERF_ST 103-0 Analysis & Performance of Literature

The course studies the performance of poetry, short fiction, and non-fiction. It explores how performance helps the performer and audience to understand a text; it considers in what ways a performance can "match" a written text; and it examines the techniques of performance. Students write three critical papers and give three live, graded performances. There are some quizzes and workshops. The class is neither an acting class nor an English class, but it draws on practices fundamental to both. Much of class time will be devoted to performance of texts and rigorous critical discussion of the performances and the works on which they are based. Consequently, attendance is mandatory. It examines the role of the audience in the critical reception of the text. The course is designed for both students with little prior performance experience and those with considerable theatrical experience. It is an excellent course for students to take who want to become excellent communicators; it hones your professional skills and gives you the poise and confidence to excel in the "real world."

Summer 2017 Sec #20
07/17/17 - 08/13/17 TuTh 9 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
PERF_ST 203-0 Performance Culture and Communication

The course asks the question: How are stories and storytelling central to our lives and to human communication? We will explore how storytelling performances reflect our families, communities, culture, and nation. To engage the power and significance of storytelling performance we will focus on three units: (1) Oral Narrative. Students will learn how to conduct in-depth interviews, on a particular topic, to gather oral narratives and their meanings from specific family, friends, or community members. (2) Myth. Students will read and discuss ancient and contemporary myths to unravel deeper questions about local and global experiences. (3) News Reports. Through guided instruction students will select a current news story, from electronic or newspaper journalism, they feel reveals an urgent issue they are compelled to share. Each of the three units will culminate in a performance: a solo performance of an oral narrative, a group performance of a myth and, finally, a multi-media group performance of a news story. The course is highly interactive and performance based. The unifying thread and overarching question for the course is: How does storytelling performance and creative communication help us better engage and illuminate our world and the world of others, e.g., identity, family, community, nation, social relations, political institutions and economic orders?

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/16/17 TuTh 9 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Philosophy
PHIL 110-0 Introduction to Philosophy

This course serves as a historical introduction to philosophy, focusing on the topic of philosophical doubt or skepticism. Over the course of the history of philosophy, some philosophers have relied on skepticism – the questioning of our most closely held beliefs – as a means for arriving at philosophical positions that are not susceptible to skeptical concerns. Others have embraced skepticism wholeheartedly, arguing that we can never justify some of our most closely held beliefs. We will consider two varieties of skepticism: First, skepticism that our understanding of the external world accurately reflects the world around us. Second, skepticism that there is an objective moral code that applies to humans, and that such a code is worth following. In taking this focus, the course introduces students to two principal areas of philosophical inquiry: theoretical philosophy (considering questions about the contents of the world and what we can know about them) and practical philosophy (considering moral questions).

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh noon – 2:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
PHIL 225-0 Minds and Machines

This course is about the nature of the mind, and in particular the nature of emotions. We will focus on questions about computational approaches to understanding the human mind, and the possibility of fully minded artificial intelligence. Throughout the course our focus will be on problems that arise when we think about emotions and the ways in which a better understanding of emotions can help us grasp what it is to have a mind and what that might mean for the future of artificial intelligence.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 MW noon – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
PHIL 240-0 Freedom and Responsibility

It is customary for us to hold each other responsible for our actions. Moreover, this seems to be an indispensible aspect of everyday human interaction, without which we could hardly make sense of our lives. Upon closer inspection, however, this ordinary practice leads to a puzzle. It seems that we are responsible for our actions only if we have the freedom to do otherwise. On the one hand, if our current choices are determined by the past together with the laws of nature, it seems that we never have the freedom to do otherwise. On the other hand, if our current choices are not determined by the past, it seems that they are not subject to our control and are not free in any meaningful sense. Hence, it appears that having the freedom necessary for responsibility is impossible. In this class we will try to make progress on diffusing this puzzle. Along the way we will be asking questions like: What is moral responsibility? What kind of freedom is necessary for responsibility? Is determinism compatible with this kind of freedom? What is the relationship between rationality and responsibility? Can we make sense of our lives if there is no responsibility? Are metaphysical questions about freedom and determinism relevant to understanding responsibility?

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
PHIL 269-0 Bioethics

An analysis of the ethical issues that arise as a result of developments in medicine and biotechnology. Topics considered will include cloning and stem cell transplantation, human and animal research, new reproductive technologies, the definition of death, abortion, euthanasia, and the allocation of resources.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College Ethics and Values distribution requirement, Area V.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 MW 4 – 7 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Physics
PHYSICS 130-1 College Physics: Mechanics

Overview of class:  Mechanics. Algebra-based physics primarily for biology majors and premedical students who do not need to take calculus-based physics. Concurrent registration in PHYSICS 136 laboratory is required. 

Topics:
Motion in One Dimension
Vectors, Motion in a Plane
Motion in a Plane
Particle Dynamics
Work and Energy
Conservation of Energy
Conservation of Linear Momentum
Collisions
Rotational Kinematics
Rotational Dynamics and Conservation of Angular Momentum
Oscillations
Gravitation
Fluids

Laboratory Excercises:
Kinematics I: Uniform Acceleration. The study of an object sliding down a frictionless incline.
Kinematics II: Acceleration-deceleration. The study of the interrelation between displacement, velocity, and acceleration for an object with changing acceleration.
Newton\'s 2nd Law. Study of the relationship of mass and acceleration
Conservation of Energy. Study of the transformation of energy from one form to another.
Conservation of Momentum. Conservation of momentum and energy is verified for an elastic collision.

Conservation of Momentum in 2-D. Conservation of momentum and energy is verified for an elastic collision in a plane. Rotation of a Rigid Body around a Fixed Axis I. Study of the relationship between torque, force, and moment of inertia.
The Pendulum. The simple pendulum and the physical pendulum are compared.

 

 This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.


Additional Information:

Registration Requirements:  Algebra and trigonometry.

Teaching Method:  Five 2 hour lectures, five discussion, and 2- 3 two-hour laboratories per week. Turning Point Classroom Clickers will be used.

Evaluation Method:  Daily quizzes, one midterm examination, lab grade, and a final examination.

Class Materials (Required):

Physics by Giancoli, 7th ed, publisher- Pearson
1st quarter lab manual by Stipes (available at Norris)
scientific calculator
.pdf viewer (Adobe Acrobat Reader or equivalent)
Laboratory Notebook (Quadrille ruled and permanent binding)
Blackboard Course Management: https://courses.northwestern.edu/webapps/login/

 

Class Materials (Suggested):  Turningpoint clickers

Summer 2017 Sec #23
06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech. Institute L211
Evanston Campus Open
PHYSICS 130-2 College Physics: Electricity and Magnetism

Overview of class:

Algebra-based physics primarily for premedical students who do not need to
take calculus-based physics. Topics covered are similar to those of 135-2. Concurrent registration in PHYSICS 136 laboratory is required.

1. Static electricity
2. Electric fields
3. Electrical potentials
4. D.C. Circuits
5. Capacitors
6. Magnetic fields
7. Inductance
8. Inductors
9. A.C. Circuits

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.


Additional Information:

Registration Requirements:

High-school algebra
Preferred Physics 130-1

Teaching Method:

Daily 2-hour lectures with demonstrations, daily discussion section, two-hour laboratory 3 times per week.

Evaluation Method:

1 midterm, a final exam, daily quizzes, and a lab grade.

Class Materials (Required):

Physics by Giancoli, 7th ed, publisher- Pearson
2nd quarter lab manual by Stipes (available at Norris)
scientific calculator
.pdf viewer (Adobe Acrobat Reader or equivalent)
Laboratory Notebook (Quadrille ruled and permanent binding)
Blackboard Course Management: https://courses.northwestern.edu/webapps/login/

 

Class Materials (Suggested):

 

Turningpoint clickers

 

Summer 2017 Sec #23
07/10/17 - 07/30/17 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech. Institute L211
Evanston Campus Open
PHYSICS 130-3 College Physics: Wave Phenomena and Modern Physics

Overview of class:

Wave phenomena, optics, quantum physics and special topics. Credit 1 quarter -course. Algebra-based physics primarily for Biology majors and premedical students who do not need to take calculus-based physics. Prerequisites: algebra and trigonometry. Concurrent registration in PHYSICS 136 laboratory is required.

Topics:

1. Waves in Elastic Medium
2. Sound Waves
3. Electromagnetic Waves
4. The Nature and Propagation of Light
5. Reflection and Refraction - Plane Waves and Plane Surfaces
6. Reflection and Refraction - Spherical Waves and Spherical Surfaces
7. Interference8. Diffraction
9. Gratings and Spectra
10. Polarization
11. Light and Quantum Physics
12. Waves and Particles
13. Special Relativity
14. Nuclear Physics

Laboratory Exercises:

1. Sound - Speed of sound is measured and standing wave patterns observed.
2. Snell\\\'s Law - the law of refraction is verified, and applications in optical fibers studied.
3. Geometric Optics - real and virtual objects and images are studied for convergent and divergent lenses.
4. Double Slit Diffraction - study of the diffraction and interference patterns for various double slits and grating.
5. Single Slit Diffraction - the study of the diffraction and interference patterns for various single slits and round apertures.
6. Intensity Distribution in a Diffraction Pattern - the intensity distribution of a single slit diffraction pattern is observed using a photo sensor array.
7. Intensity of polarized light.
8. Spectral Nature of Light- a grating spectrometer is used to study the light spectra from an incandescent source as well as the line spectra of several gases.

 

 This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.


Additional Information:

Learning Objectives:

We intend to teach the physical models of several natural phenomena at the level that students familiar with algebra and trigonometry can solve some of the simpler problems associated with the phenomena. We will demonstrate detailed strategies for solving these problems, point out how each strategy satisfies the assumptions of the models, and why other strategies might fail to satisfy some of these assumptions.

Teaching Method:

Each lecture will detail the physical phenomenon under consideration and its mathematical model will be presented. Example problems will be presented for these phenomena along with relevant classroom demonstrations. Additional examples are provided in the textbook. During the daily discussion period, the TA will demonstrate solutions to problems, answer questions about subject matter, and proctor a quiz.

Evaluation Method:

Quizzes (best 9 out of 10)=1/5
Midterm: 1/5
Final Exam=2/5
Laboratory=1/5

Class Materials (Required):

Physics by Giancoli, 7th ed, publisher- Pearson
3rd quarter lab manual by Stipes (available at Norris)
scientific calculator
.pdf viewer (Adobe Acrobat Reader or equivalent)
Laboratory Notebook (Quadrille ruled and permanent binding)
Blackboard Course Management: https://courses.northwestern.edu/webapps/login/

 

Class Notes:

Class supporting material will be posted to Blackboard and students are expected to make use of this resource. Lecture slides, solutions to selected homework problems along with exam and quiz keys will be made available.

 

Summer 2017 Sec #23
07/31/17 - 08/20/17 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech. Institute L211
Evanston Campus Open
PHYSICS 135-1 General Physics: Mechanics

Particle kinematics, Newtonian dynamics, work and energy, collisions and momentum, torque and angular momentum, rigid-body statics and dynamics, harmonic oscillations, gravitation. Concurrent registration in PHYSICS 136 laboratory is required. Prerequisites: differential and integral calculus. This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.


Additional Information:

Class Materials (Required):

Fundamentals of Physics 10th edition extended by Jearl Walker
Physics Laboratory Manual, 1st Quarter (available at Norris)
scientific calculator
Quality laboratory notebook with permanent binding and Quadrille ruled for recording data in lab.

Class Materials (Suggested):

Fundamentals of Physics 10th edition extended-Student Solutions Manual and Student Study Guide, by Jearl Walker

 

Summer 2017 Sec #23
06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech. Institute L221
Evanston Campus Open
PHYSICS 135-2 General Physics: Electricity and Magnetism

Electrostatics, magnetostatics, DC and AC circuits, time-varying fields, Ampere's Law, Gauss's Law. Concurrent registration in PHYSICS 136 laboratory is required. Prerequisites: differential and integral calculus and PHYSICS 135-1 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.


Additional Information:

Class Materials (Required):

Fundamentals of Physics 10th edition extended by Jearl Walker
Physics Laboratory Manual, 2nd Quarter (available at Norris)
scientific calculator
Quality laboratory notebook with permanent binding and Quadrille ruled for recording data in lab.

Class Materials (Suggested):

Fundamentals of Physics 10th edition extended -Student Solutions Manual and Guide, by Jearl Walker

 

Summer 2017 Sec #23
07/10/17 - 07/30/17 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech. Institute L221
Evanston Campus Open
PHYSICS 135-3 General Physics: Wave Phenomena and Modern Physics

Mechanical waves, sound waves, geometric optics, interference and diffraction, the quantum nature of particles and light, atomic and nuclear phenomena. Concurrent registration in PHYSICS 136 laboratory is required. Prerequisites: differential and integral calculus and PHYSICS 135-2 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.


Additional Information:

Class Materials (Required):

Fundamentals of Physics 10th edition extended by Jearl Walker
Physics Laboratory Manual, 3rd Quarter (available at Norris)
scientific calculator
Quality laboratory notebook with permanent binding and Quadrille ruled for recording data in lab.

Class Materials (Suggested):

Fundamentals of Physics 10th edition extended -Student Solutions Manual and Guide, by Jearl Walker

 

Summer 2017 Sec #23
07/31/17 - 08/20/17 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech. Institute L221
Evanston Campus Open
PHYSICS 136-0 Physics Laboratory

This is the required physics laboratory for both the PHYSICS 130-1,2,3 and the PHYSICS 135-1,2,3 sequences. This is a .34 credit earning lab. There is a $250 lab fee attached to this lab. It may not be waived or taken separately. Students must register separately for each course of the laboratory (136-1, 136-2, 136-3) if they are taking more than one course in either physics sequence. The enrollment in each laboratory section is strictly limited to 20 students. Students must not assume that they are able to take a section at a specific time. Part-time work or other commitments must be arranged so that students can be in alternate laboratory sections should their first choice be closed. The nine-week sequence comprises a total of 24 laboratories, 8 for each course. Laboratories meet on a rotating schedule, meaning that they meet on MTWThF, but not every M, not every T, etc. There are an average of three labs per week. At the start of classes, students receive a syllabus showing the exact days on which laboratories meet. The times for each section are as follows and are the same for each session of the sequence:136-1, 2, 3 Sec. 38: 7-9 am; 136-1, 2, 3 Sec. 48: 1-3 pm; 136-1, 2, 3 Sec. 58: 3-5 pm

Summer 2017 Sec #38, 48, 58
06/19/17 - 08/27/17 MTuWThF Time: TBA Tech. Institute
Evanston Campus Open
Political Science
POLI_SCI 210-0 Introduction Empirical Methods Political Science

This course provides an introduction to the empirical methods political scientists use to answer questions about politics, and the reasons why such methods matter. After exploring how hard it is to make good descriptive and causal inferences about politics, we will examine three basic strategies for overcoming the obstacles to reliable knowledge about the political world: experimentation, large N or quantitative studies (AKA statistics), and small N studies that use qualitative reasoning. This class fulfills the political science department methods requirement.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
POLI_SCI 220-0 American Government and Politics

This course introduces students to topics related to the development and maintenance of the U.S. system of government. It surveys the nature of American political institutions, behavior, and ideas while understanding the importance of these features for sustaining American democracy. Topics include the Constitution, federalism, civil rights, civil liberties, Congress, the Presidency, the Courts, political parties, interest groups, public opinion, the media, and campaigns and elections. Contemporary issues and debates in American politics and elections are discussed throughout. (This course counts toward WCAS Distribution Requirements, Division III; fulfills Major and Minor requirements in Political Science; and satisfies requirements in other majors and schools as well, e.g., Medill distribution requirement.)

Summer 2017 Sec #24
06/19/17 - 07/16/17 TuWTh 2 – 4:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
POLI_SCI 343-0 Politics of International Law

From whales to nuclear weapons to genocide and beyond, much of what people and governments do is defined, regulated, shaped, or otherwise influenced by international law. International law consists of binding commitments made between governments. This seminar examines the key concepts and practices of international law and looks at their connection with politics. The class will cross the line between political science and legal scholarship, and draws cases, readings, and debates from both.

Summer 2017 Sec #24
06/19/17 - 07/16/17 TuWTh 9:30 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
POLI_SCI 379-SA China in Transition: Ideology, Political Economy, Law, and Relations with the US

Course description: This course aims to provide a hands-on introduction to Chinese politics, economy, and legal system, as well as US-China relations. It is intended to help students make sense of what they observe and experience, while also offering an opportunity to explore selected themes and topics in greater depth and to acquire a more visceral understanding of how institutions and processes operate in China.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/19/17 - 07/16/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Open
POLI_SCI 381-SA Political Economy of Contemporary China

Course description: This course offers in-depth discussions of four aspects of contemporary Chinese political economy. The first aspect is state capitalism (or capitalism with Chinese characteristics), and we will discuss the role of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) in China’s economic development as well as the challenges in SOE reform. The second section examines the process of building up the Chinese regulatory state and the unfinished tasks of regulating an economy of China’s size and complexity. The third topic concerns the social consequences of economic development, including social inequality, corruption, and demographic challenges. The last section examines foreign businesses in China and China’s financial reforms.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
07/17/17 - 08/13/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Open
POLI_SCI 390-0 Special Topics In Political Science: The Sixties: Politics and Culture

America in the 1960s has often been called a revolutionary era. It was certainly a time of turmoil. What generated this critical era? Was it the demand for citizenship rights? Was it rooted in some version of Marxist or Post Marxist ideology? What was the role of popular culture, music, drugs, hippiedom etc. in this period? The critical question, however, is whether this was a period of revolution or a carefully played out moment of capitalist readjustment to lessen potential tensions in American society. Readings will focus on primary texts in the areas of race, gender, Vietname, and advertising. Assignments will consist of a take home midterm, take home final, and short book review.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 TuTh 6 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
POLI_SCI 390-0 Special Topics in Political Science: Politics of War

This class will look at the basic ideas of Strategy and how it relates to the Politics of War. We will consider classic theories and then look at the present where civil wars have taken over from inter-state wars.

Summer 2017 Sec #35
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 MW 6 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Psychology
PSYCH 110-0 Introduction to Psychology

The purpose of Introduction to Psychology is to do just that - give an overview of the field of psychology. Class lectures, demonstrations, and readings will give you a sense of the scientific study of psychology across many areas of inquiry. Among the topics that we will cover are: biological bases of behavior; perception; memory; learning; emotion and motivation; social psychology; and psychological disorders. Ultimately, the goal is to provide you with an enhanced understanding of the fundamentals of behavior, thought, and human nature. Grades will be based on weekly quizzes and a cumulative final exam. Required Text: Gazzaniga, M., Heatherton, T., & Halpern, D. (2015). Psychological Science, 5th edition. W.W. Norton, Publisher. ISBN: 9780393937497. Students must use the 5th edition of the textbook.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 TuTh 10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
PSYCH 201-0 Statistical Methods in Psychology

An introduction to basic descriptive and inferential statistics commonly used in psychological research. Topics will include measures of central tendency and variability, z-scores, normal distribution, hypothesis testing, t-tests, ANOVA, chi-square tests, and correlation.

Prerequisite: High school algebra and PSYCH 110 or equivalent.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement. Teaching Method: Lecture, in-class team problem sets.

Evaluation Method: Grades will be based on weekly quizzes, two exams, in-class team problem sets, individual problem sets, and a short paper. Textbook: Glenberg, A. & Andrzejewski, M. (2008). Learning from Data: An Introduction to Statistical Reasoning (3rd Edition) Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. ISBN: 9780805849219


Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 MW 2 – 5 p.m. Swift Hall 210
Evanston Campus Open
PSYCH 204-CN Social Psychology

This course examines psychological processes in social behavior, including thinking about and interacting with other people and groups, as well as the effects of social and cognitive processes on the ways individuals perceive, influence, and relate to others. Topics include person perception, the self, prejudice and stereotyping, social identity, attitudes and attitude change, conformity, interpersonal attraction, altruism, aggression, group processes. The course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. In-class session dates will be announced. This course is open to Leadership and Organization Behavior year one cohort students only. First class attendance is mandatory. This class will meet 6/24, 7/1, 7/8, 7/15, and 7/22.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 Sa 1:30 – 5 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open
PSYCH 205-0 Research Methods in Psychology

Students will learn how to conceive of behavioral research ideas, how to translate them into testable hypotheses, how to design experiments to test those hypotheses, how to analyze and interpret the data, and how to write up the results in APA journal format. Students will be evaluated based on class participation, research projects, and write-ups. All course materials will be provided through Canvas. Students are encouraged to download R into their laptop computers and bring them to class. Pre-requisites: Psych 110, Psych 201 or department-approved equivalent.

Summer 2017 Sec #24
06/19/17 - 07/16/17 TuWTh 1 – 3:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
PSYCH 228-0 Cognitive Psychology

This course is an introduction to cognitive psychology, covering topics such as perception, attention, memory, knowledge representation, language, reasoning and problem solving, judgment and decision-making, and consciousness. Classes will consist of lectures, demonstrations, and discussion. Students will be required to think critically about the assumptions and methods underlying research on class topics. Grades will be based on weekly quizzes and a cumulative final exam.

Required Text: Reisberg, D. (2016). Cognition: Exploring the Science of the Mind, 6th edition. New York: W.W. Norton. ISBN: 978-0-393-29328-9. You do need to use the 6th edition of the text.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 110 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College social and behavioral sciences distribution requirement, Area III.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 TuTh 2:30 – 5:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
PSYCH 303-0 Psychopathology

This course will provide an introduction to the major categories of psychological distress and related research findings. Goals/topics include encouraging thoughtful and critical evaluation of the DSM system of classification; exploring etiological theories and how these theories have changed throughout recent history; considering ethical, legal, and social issues involved in the diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders; developing critical thinking skills through the study of several controversial issues in abnormal psychology; and emphasizing the human face of psychological distress through case studies, readings, and videos. The dominant teaching method for this course will be lecture, although discussion is also welcome. Grades will be based on three exams and three short response papers. Pre-requesite: Psych 110. Required Text: Butcher, J.N., Hooley, J.M., Nock, M., & Mineka, S. (2016). Abnormal Psychology (17th ed.). Pearson.

 

Summer 2017 Sec #23
06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MTuWTh 2 – 4:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
PSYCH 314-0 Special Topics: Evolutionary Psychology

The purpose of this course is to examine the logic and the science of evolution, and its application to human psychology. Specific topics will include emotions, love for genetic relatives, human mating (focusing especially on sex differences in behavior and preferences), aggression, and cultural evolution. The only pre-requisite for this class is Introduction to Psychology (Psych 110). The teaching method will be a combination of lecture and class discussions. Evaluation will consist of two exams (a midterm and a second exam on the last day of class). There is no textbook for the class. Readings will be provided by the instructor.

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 TuTh 6 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Cancelled
PSYCH 314-0 Special Topics in Psychology: Positive Psychology

Psychology has traditionally focused on understanding mental illness, ra rather than factor that lead to optimal mental well-being. This seminar will instead focus upon the questions asked within the growing science of positive psychology. What is happiness? Can happiness be learned, or is our happiness "setpoint" mostly determined by genetics? Do we know ourselves well enough to know what makes us happy, and if not, why not? Does money make us happy? Relationships? Religion? How do people create a sense of meaning in their lives? What types of situations encourage cognitive mastery and creativity? How do we, as a society, encourage generosity and altruism? In this seminar, students will read a mix of recent scientific journal articles and books, will write opinion papers about the scientific findigns, and will journal about their own experiences in trying to apply these findings to their own lives, using weekly well-being exercises. Students can expect to wrestle with some of the "big questions" about what makes a good life and a strong scoiety in discussions with their classmates. All readings posted on Canvas; no required textbook. Grading based on discussion questions, in class papers, weekly exercises and journal, midterm exam, and final presentation.

Summer 2017 Sec #35
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 TuTh 2 – 5 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
PSYCH 314-0 Special Topics: Science & Controversy in Clinical Psychology

What is a mental disorder, and can we really define what it means to be abnormal? Furthermore, how confident are we that our treatments are helping? In some cases, is treatment even necessary? For many years, these kinds of questions have captivated the field of clinical psychology, which is dedicated to the study of mental disorders and their treatment. In this seminar, we will explore several important controversies throughout the history of clinical psychology that have sparked intense debate about what constitutes a mental disorder and what, if anything, should be considered for treatment. We will examine, for example, the controversies related to the effectiveness of psychiatric medication, the origins of dissociative identity disorder (formerly multiple personality disorder), the outcomes of child sexual abuse, and the classification of gender dysphoria and transsexualism. Some of these controversies continue to divide the field today. In our discussion and critical analysis of these scientific controversies, we will integrate both the theoretical and empirical psychological literature. By reading, discussing, and writing about scientific controversies in clinical psychology, you will develop the ability to critically evaluate the validity of psychological claims and effectively articulate and support your own claims. Additionally, we will undertake some parts of scientific research ourselves: formulating hypotheses, designing and running studies to test them, and working with and interpreting data. Through direct involvement with the research process, you will be able to propose and actually test a controversial idea in clinical psychology of your own. Psych 303 is highliy recommended as a pre-requesite. Class Materials (Required): There is no textbook required for this course. All readings will be posted on Canvas. Evaluation Method: Grading will be based on two research reports, two short papers, and participation.

Summer 2017 Sec #45
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 MW 3 – 6 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
PSYCH 377-0 Child Psychopathology

This course examines the major psychopathologies of childhood and adolescence. Various theories for the etiologies of child and adolescent psychopathology are considered, and the implications for diagnosis, consultation, and treatment are also addressed. Since this is an upper-level research course, students will develop research skills by exploring the empirical research in the field. Each student will also develop an independent research proposal as a final project for the class. Course assessments include two short case papers, co-facilitating class discussion, and the final research proposal. Prerequisites: PSYCH 205-Research Methods. PSYCH 218-Developmental Psychology and/or PSYCH 303-Psychopathology are highly recommended. \n\nBooks: Beauchaine, T.P. & Hinshaw, S.P. (Eds). (2017). Child and Adoelscent Psychopathology (3rd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. ISBN: 978-1-119-16995-6.\n\nWilmshurst, L. (2015). Child and Adolescent Psychopathology: A Casebook (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. ISBN: 978-1-452-24232-3. \nOther readings to be distributed via Canvas.\n

Summer 2017 Sec #25
06/19/17 - 07/23/17 MW 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Religion
RELIGION 170-0 Introduction to Religion

Religion is a global phenomenon, affecting people, societies, and cultures across the world, but what is “religion” and how do we study it? In this course, students will consider basic questions about religions from a variety of perspectives employed in the contemporary study of religion. Materials for this course will examine multiple traditions, geographical locations, and historical periods. This course will critically examine religious texts, beliefs, histories, theologies, practices, rituals, spaces, and places within larger social, political, cultural, and media contexts. One goal of the course is to critically explore and understand various ways of being “religious” in the contemporary world. Students will leave this course better informed and able to discuss the variety of religious experiences and expressions.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 12:30 – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
RELIGION 210-0 Introduction to Buddhism

This course will be an introduction, suitable for beginners and others, to Buddhism, the philosophy and religion that began in India some 2500 years ago and now exists in almost all parts of the world. Buddhism has shaped the thought and culture of Asia and has also influenced Western thought and culture in significant ways. In this class we will examine some of the forms of this diverse tradition. One emphasis will be on investigating the philosophical and religious teachings of Gautama the Buddha in India as well as the history and thought of later Buddhists in other parts of Asia. We will explore Buddhism’s system of values, its interpretation of existence, and its several systems of meditation and practices that the Buddhists have employed to find meaning in life.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 4:30 – 6:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
RELIGION 230-0 Introduction to Judaism

This course attempts to answer the questions "What is Judaism?" and "Who is a Jew?" by surveying the broad arc of Jewish history, reviewing the practices and beliefs that have defined and continue to define Judaism as a religion, sampling the vast treasure of Jewish literatures, and analyzing the unique social conditions that have made the cultural experience of Jewishness so significant. The class will employ a historical structure to trace the evolutions of Jewish literature, religion, and culture through the ages.

 This course counts toward the Weinberg College ethics and values distribution requirement, Area V.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/16/17 MW 9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Radio/ Television/ Film
RTVF 298-0 Media Topics: Summer at the Movies

" "Summer at the Movies" is an introductory course that takes students through the basics of film language, including, narrative structure, editing techniques, cinematography, moving camera, art design, sound and new technology. Through weekly screenings of film clips taken from Hollywood movies, American independent film and foreign language cinema, both European and Asian, students are exposed to a wide variety of works that utilize the above techniques in traditional and innovative ways. This background provides students with the necessary tools to analyze feature length works which will be shown in class or at local commercial cinemas. Films will include the great classics of film history as well as the latest works by contemporary directors. Students are expected to write weekly critiques based on these screenings. By the end of the semester, participants should be fully conversant in all aspects of filmmaking and able to appreciate and critique movies on their own, if not become the next Roger Ebert.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open
RTVF 322-0 RTVF Genre: Modern Horror in America

Designed to provide students with a detailed understanding of the key conventions, themes, and stylistic traits of the modern American horror film, this course will ask students to engage with well-known horror screen presences like Leatherface, Freddy Krueger, and Hannibal Lecter from the perspectives of both fans and critics. Featuring week-long units focusing on topics including the gritty and gory horror flicks of the 1970s, feminism in 1980s horror, 1990s’ serial killer media, body horror in the 2000s, and the self-reflexive meta and fan horror of today, this course will allow students to explore the variety of ways that horror films not only thrill us, but engage with important social, gender, and cultural issues, as well. Through weekly film screenings, discussions, and short writing assignments, students will have a chance to voice their ideas regarding the horror genre’s importance to the cinematic arts, hone their critical analysis skills, and gain a deeper knowledge of how American horror cinema works to examine themes and concepts that may not only frighten us as individuals, but as a nation.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open
RTVF 360-0 Topics in Media Writing:

Do you have a great idea and you struggle with how to tell people about it? Have you written a script that you are now wanting to learn how to sell? Are you an introverted writer who wants to get better at talking about yourself and your original ideas? How to Pitch an Idea:

This course will explore: How you sell yourself in a room thus giving you an even greater chance at selling your ideas.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
RTVF 379-0 Topics in Film/Video/Audio Production: Drawing Boot Camp

An intensive accelerated drawing comse for students that have no drawing experienoe. Through demonstrations, screenings, readings and hands-on work, students will learn all the basic principles of drawing that can be used for storyboarding, animation, cartooning and art practioe. The class will cover contours, spaoe, relationships,light and shadow, fonnal perspective, anatomical proportions, figure drawing, cartooning, and creating visual narratives.

Summer 2017 Sec #22
06/19/17 - 07/03/17 MTuWTh 6 – 9:45 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
RTVF 398-0 History and Culture of Teen Media

Since ‘the teenager’ first emerged as a cultural category, the relationship between teenagers and the mass media has been fraught. Falling somewhere in between children and adults, teenagers’ relationships with media have been the subject of criticism and cultivation, central to political policies, commercial industries, cultural debates, and textual forms. This course provides a critical and historical introduction to the category ‘teen media,’ tracing its development from Elvis ‘the Pelvis’ and the moral panics of the 1950s to the teen movies of the 1980s to contemporary youth internet cultures. Throughout the quarter, students will explore the history of the genre, looking at a wide a variety of teen media texts—including the Gidget franchise, the movies of John Hughes, the TV programs of UPN and the WB, and the music of Justin Beiber. Together, we will examine the role of teenagers as audience members, mediated representations, cultural consumers, and subjects of social anxiety. What is teen media? Who is the teen audience? How has teen media changed over time? How do teen media explore issues of race, gender, class, and sexuality? And how do teenagers use media to express or explore questions of identity? In asking these questions, students will perform formal analyses of teen media texts by examining their complex positions within youth oriented industries and teen fan practices. By providing a critical history of teen media, this course asks students to take the genre seriously and give their attention to its social, cultural, economic, and political significance.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
RTVF 490-1 Summer Internship Seminar

TBA

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 08/13/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Open Caesar ID: 40702
Sociology
SOCIOL 207-0 Cities in Society

Cities have long been a key lens into the social, political, and
economic forces of the modern world. It was in the industrializing
cities of Western Europe and North America that the founding
sociologists grappled with social and economic changes such as the
emergence of capitalism, racial domination, and modern culture.
Contemporary scholars have added analyses of how cities are shaped
by gender, sexuality, globalization, policing, and consumption. This
course offers a survey of the empirical and theoretical traditions of
urban sociology, from the turn of the twentieth century to today. We
will examine classical literature and contemporary scholarship,
highlighting a diverse set of theoretical and methodological
approaches. Chicago will serve as a frequent muse for this course,
providing the setting for many of our readings and inspiring our
discussions and assignments. As a final paper, students will write a
research report on a Chicago community. This course assumes some
familiarity with sociological theory and methods.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 12:30 – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
SOCIOL 232-0 Sexuality and Society

Sexuality is fundamental to the social, cultural, political, and economic organization of our society. The sociological study of sexuality explores these linkages and uses a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to analyze sexual identities, meanings, behaviors, practices, morality, politics, and power. This course will introduce students to these different perspectives and ask the basic question: what does it mean to think of sexuality sociologically? We will explore topics including sexual identity, sexual rights, sex work, sex crime, sexual cultures, and more.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
SOCIOL 302-0 Sociology of Organizations

This course is an introduction to major sociological approaches to studying organizations. We will ask questions such as: How do organizations such as companies and schools make decisions? How are organizations structured? The study will mix theory with accounts of what actually goes on inside organizations. We will explore topics such as multinational firms, race and gender gaps, and organizational culture.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
SOCIOL 348-0 Race, Politics and the Law

This course examines the role of race in American politics, policy, and law. In turn, it considers how political and legal institutions shape the social significance of race in the United States. The course will place special emphasis on the American criminal justice system, using historical and contemporary examples to explore the meaning of social construction as it pertains to race. The first part of the course will situate the concepts of race, racism, and racial inequality in theoretical and historical perspective. We will then address major developments in American penal policy through the lens of race, including the origins and effects of the prison boom, the consequences of criminal conviction for individuals and communities, and the question of a legitimacy crisis facing the American penal state.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
07/17/17 - 08/13/17 TuTh 1 – 4:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
SOCIOL 355-0 Medical Sociology

Social construction of health and illness; inequalities in distribution of illness and health care; organization of health care work and occupations.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Cancelled
SOCIOL 376-0 Special Topics: Sociology of Infectious Disease

Drawing from science and technology studies and medical sociology, this course considers the social impacts of infectious diseases, as well as their social etiologies. We will focus on "classic" diseases such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and sexually transmitted diseases, but will also discuss emergent infectious diseases such as the Ebola virus disease and Zika. The course considers these diseases in crosscultural and international perspectives, with some historical backdrop.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 1 – 3:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Spanish
SPANISH 101-1 Elementary Spanish

Communicative method. Development of speaking, listening, conversation, and grammar skills, as well as knowledge of Hispanic culture, through context. Five class meetings a week. Prerequisite: For students who have studied Spanish less than two years

Summer 2017 Sec #23
06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
SPANISH 101-2 Elementary Spanish

For students who have studied Spanish less than two years. Communicative method. Development of speaking, listening, conversation, and grammar skills, as well as knowledge of Hispanic culture, through context. Five class meetings a week. Prerequisite: NU Spanish 101-1

Summer 2017 Sec #23
07/10/17 - 07/30/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
SPANISH 101-3 Elementary Spanish

For students who have studied Spanish less than two years. Communicative method. Development of speaking, listening, conversation, and grammar skills, as well as knowledge of Hispanic culture, through context. Five class meetings a week. Prerequisite: NU Spanish 101-2

Summer 2017 Sec #23
07/31/17 - 08/20/17 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
SPANISH 121-1 Intermediate Spanish

Communicative method. Further development of grammar, vocabulary, speaking, and writing skills through emphasis on cultural content and functional use of Spanish language. Five class meetings a week. Prerequisite: NU Spanish 101-3, 115-2, or Spanish Language Placement Exam

Summer 2017 Sec #23
06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MTuWThF noon – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
SPANISH 121-2 Intermediate Spanish

Communicative method. Further development of grammar, vocabulary, speaking, and writing skills through emphasis on cultural content and functional use of Spanish language. Five class meetings a week. Prerequisite: NU Spanish 121-1

Summer 2017 Sec #23
07/10/17 - 07/30/17 MTuWThF noon – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
SPANISH 121-3 Intermediate Spanish

Communicative method. Further development of grammar, vocabulary, speaking, and writing skills through emphasis on cultural content and functional use of Spanish language. Five class meetings a week. Prerequisite: NU Spanish 121-2

Summer 2017 Sec #23
07/31/17 - 08/20/17 MTuWThF noon – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Statistics
STAT 202-0 Introduction to Statistics

Data collection, summarization, correlation, regression, probability, sampling, estimation, tests of significance. Does not require calculus and makes minimal use of mathematics. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2017 Sec #24
06/19/17 - 07/16/17 MWF 10 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
STAT 202-CN Introduction to Statistics

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of statistics. Throughout the course, students will learn to: summarize data using graphs and tables; explain/calculate descriptive statistics, confidence intervals, correlation, regression, and probability; and explain tests of significance and data-production including sampling and experiments. Basic knowledge of algebra is recommended. Northwestern day school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
STAT 210-0 Introduction to Statistics for The Social Sciences

This introduction to statistics covers elementary probability theory, descriptive statistics, sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing--all frequently used in many social science, physical science, and engineering disciplines. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2017 Sec #23
06/19/17 - 07/09/17 MTuWTh 10 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
Theatre
THEATRE 312-1 The Art of Storytelling

This course is designed for students eager to explore the potential of storytelling in their lives and their work. The course will examine the current renaissance of the art of storytelling, and will empower the participants to discover their own distinct voices, as they become tellers of stories.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 9 – 11:30 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open
THEATRE 330-0 Special Topics in Theatre: Filling the space, Fulfilling the text

This is a fast paced study of classic texts as they resonate with our contemporary needs to express, challenge and question. Working with the monologue format we will use many styles of writing, including classic and contemporary works. How do our contemporary impulses serve classic texts? Can we fulfill the size, scope and dept of classic language plays and if so, how do we approach them? Can we play with style? Can we transcend the differences without being reductive?

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW
F
noon – 2 p.m.
1-2pm
Wirtz Center WALLIS
Evanston Campus Open
THEATRE 330-0 Special Topics: Pop & Rock Song Writing and Analysis for Music Theatre

This intermediate course is designed to serve as both a follow-up to Musicianship for the Actor (Theatre 262-0-20) and as a general introduction to the song writing process. Studying the elements of form, melody, harmony, and rhythm, students will deconstruct and analyze exemplary music theatre songs from styles within the Pop/Rock Musical genre. These include Rock ’n’ Roll & Motown Styles of the 1950s/60s (“Dream Girls,” “Hairspray,” etc.), Folk Rock Styles of the 1960s/70s (“Jesus Christ Superstar,” Hedwig and the Angry Inch,” etc.) and Pop & Rock Styles of the 1980s/90s (“Kinky Boots,” “Footloose,” etc) and Contemporary Styles (“Hamilton,” “Next To Normal,” etc.) The analysis will lead to experimentation with each style through guided song writing/arranging experiences. Students must have some musical literacy. Some experience with a software notation program is recommended, but not required. (The class will use FINALE software for all class work.)

Class Meets: M/W: 12-2pm; F: 1-2pm

Summer 2017 Sec #28
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MWF noon – 2 p.m. Wirtz Center South
Evanston Campus Open
THEATRE 330-0 Special Topics: Arts Leadership & Theatre Management

The course also offers an overview of artistic leadership and exposes students to artistic leaders working at theatres locally and throughout the country. Students will meet an array of Chicago theatre arts leaders and hear from these leaders about their artistic impulses and processes, creative ambitions and goals, successes, as well as their dreams for the future. Students will research an arts leader, including his/her artistic leadership styles and strategies, and the impact of these styles on artists’ own lives as well as on the work they create and the companies they run.

Summer 2017 Sec #27
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Wirtz 235 Seminar Room 1
Evanston Campus Open
THEATRE 330-0 Topics in Theatre: Building Your MT Audition Book

This course is an in-depth study of what makes a successful and useful theatre audition book. Through in-class performances, listening assignments, research and style comparison papers, the class will dissect songs into 16-Bar and 32-Bar cuts and expand repertoire from the many style and genres that make up a full audition book. Included genres, but not limited to: English Operetta, Golden Age, Disney, Sondheim, 1980-Present Contemporary Music Theatre, Pop/Rock. At the end of the term, students will leave with a foundational knowledge of how to cut a song and what songs would best show their talents at an audition.

Summer 2017 Sec #29
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
THEATRE 330-0 Topics in Theatre: Stage Combat

Description: To have a better understanding of basic stage combat while exploring physical risk and maintaining safety measures, all while telling a story through body voice and movement.

Summer 2017 Sec #30
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 MW 1 – 3:20 p.m.
Evanston Campus Cancelled
THEATRE 335-0 Introduction to Playwriting

Playwriting I: Intro to Playwriting - A general overview of the playwriting craft. Students read plays from the canon as well as contemporary plays, complete exercises that flex different writing muscles, and ultimately craft the beginning of an original full-length play. Open to students of all levels of experience. This course is a prerequisite for both the Playwriting Module and the Advanced Playwriting Sequence.

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:20 p.m. Wirtz 230 Black Box 1
Evanston Campus Open
THEATRE 341-1 Shakespeare: Scenes and Sonnets

Situation, behavior, decision, emption, human vulnerability, plus the beginnings of psychology and individualism, will have to be expressed almost entirely through language alone. We will begin by mastering scansion, then performing a sonnet, and move on to scenes from any of the extant plays. For most students, Shakespeare requires a longer period to read and to memorize. Plan on devoting extra time to the work. You should present at least two scenes, twice, the latter presentation will have changed to reflect the critical response. Begin reading as many of the plays as you can. Don't listen to recordings until later in the quarter! Students have two assigned readings: John Barton, Playing Shakespeare; Kristin Linklater, Freeing Shakespeare's Voice Fifteen pages in each book, one book at a time. Barton is also available on video in the NU Libs, and you may watch that in lieu of readings from the book These are genuine "How-to-do-it" books and will give you significant and specific directions. So READ the!

Summer 2017 Sec #26
06/19/17 - 07/30/17 TuTh 1:30 – 3:20 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
THEATRE 349-SA Latino Theatre in Context

The goal of this course is to expose students to the rich history and contemporary landscape of Cuban theatrical performance. Conducted in collaboration with Teatro Buendia, Cuba's most celebrated independent theatre company, the course will bring together US and Cuban students and artist/scholars to create a Spanish language workshop production of La Otra Tempestad, a Cuban adaptation of Shakespeare's The Tempest that offers a metaphorical reflection of the Cuban revolution. Students will participate in lectures, viewing of performances, acting classes, and rehearsal and performance, all while learning about Teatro Buendia's internationally renowned performance techniques, which combine traditional Afro-Cuban ritual, music, masks and stylized movement.

Summer 2017 Sec #20
06/01/17 - 08/31/17 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Open