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Faculty

American Studies

Gerald Butters is a historian of film specializing in the intersection of race and gender in motion pictures. A Fulbright scholar, Butters has lectured on film in Romania, Luxembourg, France and Canada and at many American universities. His books include Black Manhood on the Silent Screen, Banned in Kansas: Motion Picture Censorship, 1915–1966, and the upcoming From Sweetback to Superfly: Race and Film Audiences in Chicago's Loop. He is editor of an anthology on Blaxploitation films. Butters received his Phd in History from the University of Kansas.


Geraldo Cadava, an Associate Professor of History and Latina/o Studies, specializes in the histories of Latinas and Latinos in the United States, the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, and Latin American immigration to the United States. His first book, Standing on Common Ground: The Making of a Sunbelt Borderland (Harvard University Press, 2013 & 2016), is about cultural and commercial ties between Arizona and Sonora, Mexico, since World War II. It won the Frederick Jackson Turner prize, awarded annually by the Organization of American Historians to the author of the best first book in any field of American History. He is currently writing a history of Latino Conservatism from the 1960s to the 1990s. His scholarly and popular essays have appeared in the Journal of American History, The New York Times, and The Atlantic, among other publications. As a lifelong learner himself, he is especially interested in working students in Northwestern’s School of Professional Studies.


Caitlyn Doyle is a Visiting Assistant Professor of French. Her research is situated at the intersection of aesthetics and politics, focusing in particular on the temporality of art’s politics. Currently, she is working on a project that considers literary and filmic representations of the fugitive as both a political figure and an aesthetic category. The project considers what it means to escape, rather than solicit recognition, challenging the tendency to rely on mutual recognition or achieving visibility as indispensable to political subject formation. She teaches in the fields of literature, film, and critical theory and is the recipient of a teaching award from Western University.


Kasey Evans, Faculty Director and associate professor of English at Northwestern, teaches and writes about medieval and Renaissance literature. Her book Colonial Virtue: The Mobility of Temperance in Renaissance England (University of Toronto Press, 2012) argues that the virtue of temperance underwent a semantic sea-change during the English Renaissance, evolving from a paradigm of self-discipline and moderation into a value of time-management, efficiency, and colonial aggression. Areas of particular interest include English Renaissance adaptations of Italian poetry (Dante, Ariosto, Tasso); ideologies of race, gender, and sexuality as they shape Renaissance English literature; and literary and critical theory, from medieval exegetes through postmodern philosophers. Evans received her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.


James J. Hodge (Ph.D. University of Chicago) is Assistant Professor in the department of English and the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, and affiliate faculty in the department of Art History and the program in Screen Cultures. He specializes in digital media aesthetics at the crossroads of cinema, art history, and literary studies, especially experimental media art genres such as new media art, avant-garde film, and electronic literature. Focusing also on media and critical theory he has special interests in phenomenology and psychoanalysis (object relations). His research is devoted to the question of how artistic forms reflect the incoherence of lived experience. His book Sensations of History: Animation and New Media Art is forthcoming in 2019 from the University of Minnesota Press. His current research investigates the aesthetic sensorium of always-on computing and the emergence of new networked genres such as the animated GIF and the supercut.


Ivy Wilson teaches courses on the comparative literatures of the black diaspora and U.S. literary studies with a particular emphasis on African American culture. His forthcoming book, Specters of Democracy: Blackness and the Aesthetics of Nationalism (Oxford UP), interrogates how the figurations and tropes of blackness were used to produce the social equations that regulated the cultural meanings of U.S. citizenship and traces how African American intellectuals manipulated the field of aesthetics as a means to enter into political discourse about the forms of subjectivity and national belonging. Along with recent articles in ESQ, Arizona Quarterly, and PMLA, his other work in U.S. literary studies includes two forthcoming edited books on the nineteenth-century poets James Monroe Whitfield and Albery Allson Whitman. His current research interests focus on the solubility of nationalism in relationship to theories of the diaspora, global economies of culture, and circuits of the super-national and sub-national. Wilson has a Phd in african american studies and english from Yale University.


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