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Faculty

British Literature

Daniel Born, author of The Birth of Liberal Guilt in the English Novel: Charles Dickens to H. G. Wells, has edited numerous anthologies including The Seven Deadly Sins Sampler, and his articles and essays have appeared in academic journals and mainstream publications including Conradiana, Literature and Theology, the New York Times, and forbes.com. Born received his PhD in English literature in 1990 from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, where he studied with Irving Howe and Alfred Kazin. He was an associate professor at Marietta College where he earned the McCoy Award for Teaching Excellence twice, and later served as chief of staff and vice president at the Great Books Foundation. 


Kasey Evans

Kasey Evans

Email Kasey Evans

Currently teaching:
Adaptation and Hamlet

Kasey Evans, Faculty Director and associate professor of English at Northwestern, teaches and writes about medieval and Renaissance literature. Her book Colonial Virtue: The Mobility of Temperance in Renaissance England (University of Toronto Press, 2012) argues that the virtue of temperance underwent a semantic sea-change during the English Renaissance, evolving from a paradigm of self-discipline and moderation into a value of time-management, efficiency, and colonial aggression. Areas of particular interest include English Renaissance adaptations of Italian poetry (Dante, Ariosto, Tasso); ideologies of race, gender, and sexuality as they shape Renaissance English literature; and literary and critical theory, from medieval exegetes through postmodern philosophers. Evans received her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.


Helen Thompson (B.A. English and Chemistry, Amherst College; M.A. The Writing Seminars, Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D. Duke University) teaches eighteenth-century British and transatlantic literature, philosophy, the history of science, and feminism. She is the author of two books, Ingenuous Subjection: Power and Compliance in the Eighteenth-Century Domestic Novel (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005) and Fictional Matter: Empiricism, Corpuscles, and the Novel (University of Pennsylvania Press, January 2017). Thompson’s articles have appeared in Eighteenth-Century Studies, ELH, The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation, Eighteenth-Century Fiction, and numerous edited collections. She is currently at work on two projects: a study of eighteenth-century feminist utopian thought and a book tentatively entitled “Alchemy’s Culture: Radical Change in Restoration England.” She co-organizes the Eighteenth Century Seminar at the Newberry Library, Chicago, and serves on the Advisory Board of the journal Eighteenth-Century Studies as of July 2017. As an affiliate of the Gender & Sexuality Studies Program at Northwestern, Thompson teaches a lecture class on second-wave feminism of the 1960s and 70s as well as classes on utopian and dystopian science fiction from the second wave until today. In English, she teaches an array of courses in eighteenth-century literature from Boyle to Jane Austen and sometimes beyond. She was placed on the Associated Student Government Faculty Honor Roll in Spring 2015 and received the E. LeRoy Hall Award for Excellence in Teaching from Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences in Spring 2016.


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