Gerald Butters is a historian of film specializing in the intersection of race and gender in motion pictures. A Fulbright scholar, Butters has lectured on film in Romania, Luxembourg, France and Canada and at many American universities. His books include Black Manhood on the Silent Screen, Banned in Kansas: Motion Picture Censorship, 1915–1966, and the upcoming From Sweetback to Superfly: Race and Film Audiences in Chicago's Loop. He is editor of an anthology on Blaxploitation films. Butters received his Phd in History from the University of Kansas.


Geraldo Cadava

Geraldo Cadava

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Geraldo Cadava, an Associate Professor of History and Latina/o Studies, specializes in the histories of Latinas and Latinos in the United States, the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, and Latin American immigration to the United States. His first book, Standing on Common Ground: The Making of a Sunbelt Borderland (Harvard University Press, 2013 & 2016), is about cultural and commercial ties between Arizona and Sonora, Mexico, since World War II. It won the Frederick Jackson Turner prize, awarded annually by the Organization of American Historians to the author of the best first book in any field of American History. He is currently writing a history of Latino Conservatism from the 1960s to the 1990s. His scholarly and popular essays have appeared in the Journal of American History, The New York Times, and The Atlantic, among other publications. As a lifelong learner himself, he is especially interested in working students in Northwestern’s School of Professional Studies.


Caitlyn Doyle

Caitlyn Doyle

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Caitlyn Doyle is a Visiting Assistant Professor of French. Her research is situated at the intersection of aesthetics and politics, focusing in particular on the temporality of art’s politics. Currently, she is working on a project that considers literary and filmic representations of the fugitive as both a political figure and an aesthetic category. The project considers what it means to escape, rather than solicit recognition, challenging the tendency to rely on mutual recognition or achieving visibility as indispensable to political subject formation. She teaches in the fields of literature, film, and critical theory and is the recipient of a teaching award from Western University.


Paola Zamperini

Paola Zamperini

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Paola Zamperini is associate professor of literature and culture in Chinese and gender and sexuality studies in the department of Asian Languages and Cultures at Northwestern University. She has a Ph.D. in Chinese Literature and Women and Gender Studies from the University of California at Berkeley, and was recruited by Northwestern University in Summer 2013 as the founding chair of the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at NU and Associate Professor of Chinese Literature, after a decade at Amherst College. Gender and sexuality studies are an integral part not only of Zamperini’s training and research, but also of her pedagogy, and she has consistently divided her teaching at Northwestern between Asian Languages and Cultures, where she regularly teaches courses about pre-modern Chinese literature, dream cultures, fashion theory and histories, Buddhist literary cultures in East Asia past and present, contemporary Chinese fiction, cinema, and popular culture, and Gender and Sexuality Studies, where she teaches core courses such as Sexual Subjects: Introduction to Sexuality Studies, and Traditions of Feminist Thought (Fall 2020), and graduate seminars like Deleuze, Desire, Guattari, and Sexuality. Her pedagogical mission is to create learning environments imprinted by the methodologies and approaches of feminist and queer theory, whilst preserving and deepening engagement with Chinese and East Asian cultural traditions, past and present.


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