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Faculty

Interdisciplinary Studies

Iwona Bochenska

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Iwona Bochenska is an international relations expert whose research interests focus on the global economy, especially on business and government relations. As a specialist in international trade, economics of globalization and international organizations in the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, she develops strategies and recommendations for promoting Illinois companies globally, working with a variety of multinational organizations. Bochenska also represents the governor and commerce department in global functions, including trade missions and foreign trade delegations. For more than 10 years she has been teaching courses at Lake Forest Graduate School of Management on strategic management, strategic thinking, global business and cultural diversity, diversity and inclusion in both government and business and, in conjunction with Cambridge University and the European Union. Bochenska received her MA from the University of Warsaw and an MA from the University of Chicago, and she is currently completing her PhD from the Warsaw School of Economics.


Daniel Born, author of The Birth of Liberal Guilt in the English Novel: Charles Dickens to H. G. Wells, has edited numerous anthologies including The Seven Deadly Sins Sampler, and his articles and essays have appeared in academic journals and mainstream publications including Conradiana, Literature and Theology, the New York Times, and forbes.com. Born received his PhD in English literature in 1990 from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, where he studied with Irving Howe and Alfred Kazin. He was an associate professor at Marietta College where he earned the McCoy Award for Teaching Excellence twice, and later served as chief of staff and vice president at the Great Books Foundation. 


Caitlyn Doyle is a Visiting Assistant Professor of French. Her research is situated at the intersection of aesthetics and politics, focusing in particular on the temporality of art’s politics. Currently, she is working on a project that considers literary and filmic representations of the fugitive as both a political figure and an aesthetic category. The project considers what it means to escape, rather than solicit recognition, challenging the tendency to rely on mutual recognition or achieving visibility as indispensable to political subject formation. She teaches in the fields of literature, film, and critical theory and is the recipient of a teaching award from Western University.


Scott Durham, associate professor of French, is the faculty director for the MALit program and chair of the French and Italian department at Northwestern. He has taught both graduate and undergraduate courses in French and comparative literature since 1994, with a primary focus on 20th-century literature, film and the relationship between literature and philosophy. His scholarly publications since he completed his doctorate at Yale include Phantom Communities: The Simulacrum and the Limits of Postmodernism (Stanford University Press), Jean Genet: In the Language of the Enemy (a special number he edited for Yale French Studies) and numerous articles. He is completing work on a book with the working title The Archive and the Monad: Deleuze and the Resistance to Postmodernism.Durham earned his Phd from Yale University.


Kasey Evans

Kasey Evans

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Currently teaching:
Adaptions in Hamlet

Kasey Evans, Faculty Director and associate professor of English at Northwestern, teaches and writes about medieval and Renaissance literature. Her book Colonial Virtue: The Mobility of Temperance in Renaissance England (University of Toronto Press, 2012) argues that the virtue of temperance underwent a semantic sea-change during the English Renaissance, evolving from a paradigm of self-discipline and moderation into a value of time-management, efficiency, and colonial aggression. Areas of particular interest include English Renaissance adaptations of Italian poetry (Dante, Ariosto, Tasso); ideologies of race, gender, and sexuality as they shape Renaissance English literature; and literary and critical theory, from medieval exegetes through postmodern philosophers. Evans received her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.


David Faller

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Currently teaching:
Global Economic Policy

David Faller has extensive experience in applying the theories of monetary economics and international trade to the solution of real-life issues arising in international business and financial markets. Having started his career as a financial markets trader in Europe, Faller has created and managed derivatives market making businesses, high frequency proprietary trading teams and provided advice on currency exposure management issues to multi-national corporations and governmental bodies in Europe, Asia and the Americas. While leading the global treasury activities of a NASDAQ listed technology company, he was responsible for opening branches in a number of emerging countries where his knowledge of cultural diversity, trade and tariff regulations and international tax regimes were critical in the country location process. He has been teaching courses on international business and capital markets to under-graduate and graduate levels students since 2003. Faller holds an MBA from the Lake Forest Graduate School of Management and did graduate studies at the Europa Instituut, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Netherlands, specializing in the economic and legal issues facing member states in economically and politically integrated sovereign areas.


Elzbieta Foeller-Pituch (Assistant Director, Chabraja Center for Historical Studies, Northwestern University) is a literary historian who has published articles on contemporary authors such as John Barth and John Gardner, on Henry James, and on the international aspect of American studies. Her current research focuses on the reception of classical antiquity in American culture, a topic that stems from her research during an American Council of Learned Societies fellowship at Harvard University. Her most recent publication is a chapter in American Women and Classical Myths, ed. Gregory Staley (Baylor UP, 2009) on Athena as a cultural icon in the United States. She is working on a book-length study of the enduring influence of Greek and Roman myths in American fiction and culture. Elzbieta teaches classes on 20th-century experimental East European and American fiction, global and American postmodern fiction, and American 19th-century literary culture. Foeller-Pituch earned her Phd at the University of Warsaw.


Kathreen Fontecha

Kathreen Fontecha

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Currently teaching:
Visual Communication

Kathreen Fontecha is the UI/UX Designer and Production Coordinator at the Statewide Integrated Pest Management program at University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources. She has over a decade of experience as a graphic designer. She has extensive experience working on the visual design of technical information which sparked her interest in data analysis and information design. She is a graduate of Northwestern University’s School of Professional Studies Information Design and Strategy program with an emphasis in Data Science and Analytics. Through this program, Fontecha was able to combine her passions and interests in information collection, analysis for patterns and trends, and presenting the information visually and effectively. Fontecha received her bachelor’s degrees in Design (Visual Communications) and English from the University of California, Davis.


Angela Fontes

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Currently teaching:
Behavioral Economics

Angela Fontes is the director of the Behavioral and Economic Analysis and Decision-making (BEAD) program area in the Department of Statistics and Methodology at NORC at the University of Chicago. At NORC, Fontes oversees academic, foundation and commercial research focused on economic decision-making and consumer behavior. She is the Principal Investigator on several projects, including a five-year contract with the Securities and Exchange Commission to conduct investor protection research, and NORC’s ongoing collaboration with JUST Capital and Forbes on the JUST 100: America’s Best Corporate Citizens. Fontes' personal research centers on retirement preparedness and methodologies for the collection of household finance data. In addition to utilizing a number of large national/federal data sets including the Survey of Consumer Finances, the Survey of Income and Program Participation, and the Consumer Expenditure Survey, Fontes works extensively with the Financial Well-being and Literacy data collected using NORC’s AmeriSpeak Panel. Fontes' research can be found in journals such as the Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, Health Affairs, the Journal of Family and Economic Issues, the Journal of Women, Politics and Policy, Financial Counseling and Planning, and the International Journal of Transportation Research. Prior to NORC, Fontes worked in business and market research consulting with Chamberlain Research Consultants and Leo Burnett. She was recently awarded a Distinguished Graduate Teaching Award at SPS. Fontes is an active member of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, the American Council on Consumer Interests, and the Association for Financial Counseling and Planning Education. She holds a PhD in consumer behavior and family economics with a minor in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and is a certified Project Management Professional.


Jay Grossman

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Jay Grossman teaches and writes about eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American literature and culture, especially Emerson and Whitman, the history of the book, and the history of sexuality. He is the author of Reconstituting the American Renaissance: Emerson, Whitman, and the Politics of Representation, and co-editor of Breaking Bounds: Whitman and American Cultural Studies. A portion of his current work on the literary critic and political activist F. O. Matthiessen was published as "The Canon in the Closet: Matthiessen's Whitman, Whitman's Matthiessen" in American Literature; another, on the sexual and textual intersections between Whitman, Matthiessen, and T. S. Eliot, is forthcoming in a collection of essays from the Leaves of Grass 150th Anniversary Conference. Grossman received his PhD from the University of Pennsylvania.

Reginald (Reggie) Jackson is currently Senior Learning Engineer at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism Integrated Marketing Communications Program and Northwestern IT’s Teaching & Learning Technologies department. In this role, he consults with faculty in the design and development of courses as well as the use of technology and teaching strategies. Prior to joining Northwestern, he was an Academic Technology Analyst at University of Chicago. Before coming to higher education, he held positions as a corporate trainer and instructional designer primarily in the banking industry. He also teaches for Roosevelt University's Graduate Program in Training and Development. Reggie holds a doctorate degree in Adult Education from National-Louis University, master’s degree from Roosevelt University in Instructional Design and a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Loyola University.


Michael Kramer

Michael Kramer

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Michael J. Kramer works at the intersection of historical scholarship, the arts, digital technology, and cultural criticism. He is the author of The Republic of Rock: Music and Citizenship in the Sixties Counterculture (Oxford University Press, 2013; paperback, 2017). His current research explores the relationship between technology and tradition in the US folk music revival from the early twentieth century to the present; it includes a multimodal digital history project about the Berkeley Folk Music Festival, which took place annually on the University of California-Berkeley campus between 1958 and 1970, as well as more technical research on image sonification for historical interpretation, machine-learning sound analysis software, and the design of the digital essay. Future research focuses on the history of arts criticism in the United States, an intellectual history of the anarchist imagination in America, a history of the service worker in the US, and a biography of Chicago dance critic Ann Barzel. He teaches history and American studies at Middlebury College, where he is Associate Director of the Digital Liberal Arts. He has previously taught at Northwestern University, where he co-founded NUDHL, the Northwestern University Digital Humanities Laboratory. He also freelances as a dance dramaturg and an editorial consultant. He writes about history, the arts, politics, digital humanities, and other topics for numerous publications and blogs at michaeljkramer.net.


Gregory Kuhn currently is director of government management consulting at Sikich LLP and was assistant director for public management and training at Northern Illinois University’s Center for Governmental Studies. Kuhn has more than 28 years of combined governmental, consulting and higher education experience. He was the inaugural faculty director of the MPPA program and continues to be program adviser and lecturer. His primary teaching areas include public policy, leadership, public administration and budgeting. He also served as an instructor/lecturer for Northern Illinois University’s public administration program, and he has earned teaching awards at both NIU and SCS. Kuhn earned an MPA and PhD in public administration, public policy and organizational theory from Northern Illinois University.


Reba-Anna Lee

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Currently teaching:
Instructional Design


Dr. David Noffs has spent over 10 years as an Instructional Technologist and Designer in the Center for Innovation and Teaching Excellence at Columbia College Chicago where he oversaw the development of online interactive tools and the use of Learning Management Systems (LMS’s). In this capacity, he supervised the installation of a campus-wide Moodle (Modular Object Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment) LMS in 2008 and development of training programs for students, faculty and staff. Noffs’ work grew to include not only teaching faculty and staff ways to use technology in the classroom, but also oversight of the creation of faculty led virtual learning communities, and non-stop facilitated online courses for faculty and staff development. In addition, he helped develop and teach workshops for mobile app development, online coursework development (instructional design), grade book design, portfolio design, and an array of online teaching tools, including integration of social media into virtual learning communities. Noffs joined Northwestern University School of Professional Studies in 2015. His doctoral dissertation in Adult and Continuing Education from National Louis University is entitled, Resonating Frequencies of a Virtual Learning Community: An Ethnographic Case Study of Online Faculty Development at Columbia College Chicago. Noffs also teaches courses in Sound Design, Web Design and iOS, C# and C++ Programming at Columbia’s department of Interactive Arts and Media.


Meghann Pytka is a joint-lecturer in the Department of History and in the Program of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Southern Illinois University-Carbondale. A scholar of nineteenth and twentieth-century Central and Eastern Europe, her work focuses on topics of genocide and ethnic cleansing, imperialism and anti-colonial resistance, gender inequality, and nationalism. Pytka's research, writing, and presenting have been supported by the American Council of Learned Societies, the Fulbright Program, the International Research and Exchanges Board, and the Crown Center for Jewish Studies. She has worked with Northwestern's MPPA program since 2008. Pytka earned her PhD in history from Northwestern University.


Pamela Ransom has been active as an environmentalist, planner, researcher, educator and community activist. For more than eight years she was special assistant for environmental affairs for New York City Mayor David Dinkins. Then she moved into international activism as director of health and environment for the Women’s Environment and Development Organization. She worked closely with the late Congresswoman Bella Abzug, spoke to a variety of UN meetings and international conferences and organized major events at venues such as the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing. She has also served on the faculty of Long Island University School of Business, Public Administration and Information. Ransom received her doctorate from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Bill Savage (PhD Northwestern) has been teaching in the SPS MALit program for almost two decades. He is a scholar of Chicago literature, history, and culture, and his most recent publication is an annotated edition of George Ade’s The Old-Time Saloon: Not Wet, Not Dry—Just History (1931; University of Chicago Press, 2016). He also co-edited and annotated Chicago by Day and Night: The Pleasure Seeker’s Guide to the Paris of America (1892; Northwestern University Press, 2013). His current research focuses on popular culture and dynamics of urban space, especially focused on vernacular architectural matters like the design of hot dog stands and saloons. He writes book reviews and op-ed essays regularly for local media, and performs frequently in various live lit venues, including The Paper Machete. He is a lifelong resident of Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood.


Felicity Vabulas

Felicity Vabulas

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Currently teaching:
International Institutions

Felicity Vabulas is a political scientist whose research focuses on international organizations, international political economy, international law, human rights and foreign policy. She is also a post-doctoral lecturer at the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy where she has taught classes in political economy, American political institutions, international organizations and writing for public policy. She also helped lead the Harris School’s international policy practicums to Jordan and Israel, Turkey, Cambodia and Rwanda and Madagascar. Vabulas has ongoing research projects that focus on the effects of foreign lobbying on US foreign policy, the implications of suspensions from international organizations and the increasing use of informal international organizations such as the various G-groups. She has worked as a consultant at Accenture and researcher for the Central Intelligence Agency. She received her PhD from the University of Chicago.


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