MA in Liberal Studies Faculty

Kasey Evans

Kasey Evans

Faculty Director

Contact Information

ksevans@northwestern.edu

Kasey Evans, Faculty Director and associate professor of English at Northwestern, teaches and writes about medieval and Renaissance literature. Her book Colonial Virtue: The Mobility of Temperance in Renaissance England (University of Toronto Press, 2012) argues that the virtue of temperance underwent a semantic sea-change during the English Renaissance, evolving from a paradigm of self-discipline and moderation into a value of time-management, efficiency, and colonial aggression. Areas of particular interest include English Renaissance adaptations of Italian poetry (Dante, Ariosto, Tasso); ideologies of race, gender, and sexuality as they shape Renaissance English literature; and literary and critical theory, from medieval exegetes through postmodern philosophers. Evans received her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.

Education

PhD, University of California, Berkeley

Selected Publications

Colonial Virtue: The Mobility of Temperance in Renaissance England (University of Toronto Press, 2012)

Recent Courses

How (Not) to Be Good in Renaissance England

Henry Binford

Henry C. Binford

Contact Information

hcbin@northwestern.edu

Henry C. Binford is Professor of History at Northwestern University, where he has taught since 1973. He has served as director of the American Studies Program, the Program in Urban Studies, and the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program. He was awarded the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences Award for Distinguished Teaching in 1984, the Alumni Association Excellence in Teaching Award in 1996, the Charles Deering McCormick Professorship of Teaching Excellence in 1998, the National Faculty Award of the Association of Graduate Liberal Studies Programs in 1998, and the E. LeRoy Hall Award for Excellence in Teaching in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences in 2019. He received his A.B. and Ph.D. degrees in American history from Harvard University, and he also holds an M.A. in British history from the University of Sussex in England. His research deals generally with three themes: urban growth, technological innovation, and the ways people of diverse cultures have created subcommunities within the metropolis. He is the author of The First Suburbs: Residential Communities on the Boston Periphery, 1815-1860, published by the University of Chicago Press in 1985. His new book, From Improvement to City Planning: Spatial Management in Cincinnati, 1786-1870, will be published by Temple University Press in fall, 2021.

Education

PhD, Harvard, 1973

Current Research Interests

Urban growth
19th century cities
Race and ethnicity
Neighborhoods

Selected Publications

From Improvement to City Planning: Spatial Management in Cincinnati, 1786-1870
The First Suburbs: Residential Communities on the Boston Periphery, 1815-1860

Recent Courses

Urbanization and Urbanism: The United States in an International Context
Poverty in Anglo-American Culture
Pursuit of Community in American Life
Technology and American Culture, 1790-1930

Dan Born

Daniel Born, PhD

Contact Information

daniel-born@northwestern.edu

dankborn@gmail.com

dankborn.com

(773) 896-4327

Daniel Born has taught courses in the M.A. Literature program at SPS since 2006, on topics ranging from Post World War II American Novel and the Theological Imagination, to Victorian Decadence (British Literature of the 1890s), to the Edwardian Novel. He earned his PhD at the CUNY Graduate Center and is a former vice president at the Great Books Foundation. He is author of The Birth of Liberal Guilt in the English Novel: Charles Dickens to H. G. Wells (1995), and co-author of a Chicago crime novel, Unpardonable Sins (2001), under the pen name David Saul Bergman.

Education

PhD in English, Graduate Center of the City University of New York (1990)
M.A. in Literature, University of Kansas (1980)
B.A. in English / Philosophy, Tabor College (1978)

Current Research Interests

Victorian novel and neo-Victorian fiction
hardboiled American crime fiction
Edwardian novel literature and religion Southern literature and the Lost Cause

Selected Publications

The Birth of Liberal Guilt in the English Novel: Charles Dickens to H. G. Wells (U of North Carolina P, 1995)
Unpardonable Sins (Wipf and Stock Publishers, 2021). Pen name: David Saul Bergman
"Utopian Civic-Mindedness: Robert Maynard Hutchins, Mortimer Adler, and the Great Books Enterprise," in Reading Communities from Salons to Cyberspace, ed. DeNel Rehberg Sedo. Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan (2011): pp. 81-100.
"Private Gardens, Public Swamps: Howards End and the Revaluation of Liberal Guilt." Novel: A Forum on Fiction 25 (Winter 1992): 141-159.
"Echoes of Kipling in Marlow's 'Privileged Man'?" Conradiana: A Journal of Joseph Conrad Studies 24 (Summer 1992): pp. 100-115.
"From Cross to Cross-Stitch: the Ascendancy of the Quilt." Mennonite Quarterly Review (Apr. 2005): pp. 179-190.
"Nonviolence and Nationalism in Leigh Hunt's Early Liberal Rhetoric." Nineteenth-Century Prose 23 (Spring 1996): pp. 25-39.
"Sacred Noise in Don DeLillo's Fiction." Literature & Theology 13 (Sept. 1999), pp. 211-221. "Leadership Studies: A Critical Appraisal." In Teaching Leadership: Essays in Theory and Practice, ed. Peter Temes. New York: Peter Lang, 1996: pp. 45-72.
Daniel Born, editor, with Peter Ponzio and Donald Whitfield. The Great Books Foundation Science Fiction Omnibus (Chicago: The Great Books Foundation, 2010).

Recognition

McCoy Award for Teaching Excellence, Marietta College, Ohio, 1999-2001
McCoy Award for Teaching Excellence, Marietta College, Ohio, 1994-1998
NewCity Chicago, 2009: "Lit50: Who Really Books in Chicago" (#39)
NewCity Chicago, 2007: "Lit50: Who Really Books in Chicago" (#44)
Marietta College Greek Council Professor of the Year (2001)
National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar: "Romanticism and the Triumph of Liberalism" (Johns Hopkins University seminar directed by Dr. Jerome Christensen, 1992)
Selden Lincoln Whitcomb Fellowship for achievement in scholarship and teaching, University of Kansas, 1980
Humanities Divisional Award, Tabor College, 1977

Recent Courses

Post World War Two American Novel and the Theological Imagination
British Decadence: British Literature of the 1890s
The Afterlife of the Victorian Novel

Gerald Butters

Gerald Butters

Contact Information

gerald-jr@northwestern.edu

Gerald Butters is a historian of film specializing in the intersection of race and gender in motion pictures. A Fulbright scholar, Butters has lectured on film in Romania, Luxembourg, France and Canada and at many American universities. His books include Black Manhood on the Silent ScreenBanned in Kansas: Motion Picture Censorship, 1915–1966, and the upcoming From Sweetback to Superfly: Race and Film Audiences in Chicago's Loop. He is editor of an anthology on Blaxploitation films. Butters received his PhD in History from the University of Kansas.

Recent Courses

Black Chicago: From Du Sable to Black Lives Matter
Queer Film and Retrospectatorship
The Social Problem Film, 1940–50
Milliennial Masculinities
New Documentary Film
France at a Time of Crisis, 1930–1950
What is the Truth: Documentary Film and the Nature of Reality
Black Activism in Chicago

Geraldo Cadava

Geraldo Cadava

Contact Information

g-cadava@northwestern.edu

Geraldo Cadava, an Associate Professor of History and Latina/o Studies, specializes in the histories of Latinas and Latinos in the United States, the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, and Latin American immigration to the United States. His first book, Standing on Common Ground: The Making of a Sunbelt Borderland (Harvard University Press, 2013 & 2016), is about cultural and commercial ties between Arizona and Sonora, Mexico, since World War II. It won the Frederick Jackson Turner prize, awarded annually by the Organization of American Historians to the author of the best first book in any field of American History. He is currently writing a history of Latino Conservatism from the 1960s to the 1990s. His scholarly and popular essays have appeared in the Journal of American HistoryThe New York Times, and The Atlantic, among other publications. As a lifelong learner himself, he is especially interested in working students in Northwestern's School of Professional Studies.

Recent Courses

The 2020 Election in Historical Perspective
From Hamilton to “Hamilton” – American History by Lin Manuel Miranda

Diane Capitani

Diane Capitani

Contact Information

d-capitani@garrett.edu

Diane Capitani is the Director of the Writing Center and Affiliate Faculty in writing and theology at the Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary at Northwestern University. She has published one book, Truthful Pictures: Slavery Ordained by God in the Domestic Sentimental Novel of the 19th Century South and is currently finishing her book Jane Austen: Augustinian, as well as a Jane Austen novel. She has published articles in feminist theology, Christianity and literature, and Iris Murdoch, here and in the United Kingdom. She has spoken before the Jane Austen Society of North America at several Annual General Meetings, the Greater Chicago Region, the North Texas Region, and the Louisville, Kentucky Region. She is a lecturer in English, comparative literature and religion at Northwestern University where she has twice been a nominee for the Distinguished Teaching Award. Capitani holds four master's degrees from Northwestern University, the University of Chicago, and the Garrett Theological Seminary at Northwestern University in French, English literature, comparative literature, and theology and history. She received her PhD in theological and historical studies from the Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary at Northwestern University.

Holly Clayson

Holly Clayson

Adjunct Lecturer, Professor Emeritus

Contact Information

shc@northwestern.edu

Hollis Clayson, a historian of nineteenth-century art, is Professor of Art History and Bergen Evans Professor in the Humanities at Northwestern University. She has published widely on Paris-based art practices, including the French capital’s large population of artists from elsewhere. Her books include Painted Love: Prostitution in French Art of the Impressionist Era (1991), Paris in Despair: Art and Everyday Life Under Siege (1870–71) (2002), and Is Paris Still the Capital of the Nineteenth Century? Essays on Art and Modernity, 1850–1900 (2016), co-edited with André Dombrowski. Her newest book (2019) is Paris Illuminated: Essays on Art and Lighting in the Belle Époque. In 2013–14, she was the Samuel H. Kress Professor, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA), National Gallery of Art, Washington DC. In 2014, she was named Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Palmes académiques. She was the Visiting Kirk Varnedoe Professor at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, in fall 2015 and had fellowships at CASVA and the INHA (Paris) in 2017–18. Her new project studies World’s Fairs, and centers upon the reception of the Eiffel Tower in 1889.

Recent Courses

European Art and Architecture, 1789–1900: The Age of Revolution

Nick Davis

Nick Davis

Contact Information

nicholas-davis@northwestern.edu

Nick Davis is Associate Professor of English and Gender & Sexuality Studies at Northwestern. He recently received the NU Alumnae Teaching Professorship, one of the highest awards for classroom instruction across the university. Nick studies narrative film, queer theory, feminist and gender studies, and American literature. His book The Desiring-Image: Gilles Deleuze and Contemporary Queer Cinema theorizes a new model of contemporary queer cinema based on formal principles rather than identity politics, drawing heavily on Deleuzian philosophies of film and sexuality. He has published many other essays on subjects including Julie Dash’s Illusions, Alfonso Cuarón’s Y tu mamá también, James Baldwin’s Blues for Mister Charlie, and the performances and political activism of Julie Christie and Vanessa Redgrave. He is also the author of the film reviews at www.Nick-Davis.com and a Contributing Editor at Film Comment magazine. Davis earned his PhD at Cornell University.

Recent Courses

American Novel: Big Books (Post 1830)
Critical Frameworks in Contemporary Film
Cinema at the Turn of the Millennium
Henry James and Film
Patterns and Politics of Contemporary Adaptation

Caitlyn Doyle

Caitlyn Doyle

Contact Information

caitlyn-doyle@northwestern.edu

Caitlyn Doyle is a Visiting Assistant Professor of French. Her research is situated at the intersection of aesthetics and politics, focusing in particular on the temporality of art’s politics. Currently, she is working on a project that considers literary and filmic representations of the fugitive as both a political figure and an aesthetic category. The project considers what it means to escape, rather than solicit recognition, challenging the tendency to rely on mutual recognition or achieving visibility as indispensable to political subject formation. She teaches in the fields of literature, film, and critical theory and is the recipient of a teaching award from Western University.

Recent Courses

Introduction to Graduate Research

Elzbieta Foeller-Pituch

Elzbieta Foeller-Pituch

Adjunct Lecturer, Assistant Director Center for Historical Studies

Contact Information

efp@northwestern.edu

Northwestern University Historical Studies

Elzbieta Foeller-Pituch (Assistant Director, Chabraja Center for Historical Studies, Northwestern University) is a literary historian who has published articles on twentieth-century American authors John Barth and John Gardner, as well as on Henry James. Her chapter on the great Polish science fiction and experimental writer Stanislaw Lem appears in Being Poland: A New History of Polish Literature and Culture since 1918, edited by Tamara Trojanowska, Przemyslaw Czaplinski, and Joanna Nizynska (University of Toronto Press, 2018). Elzbieta's current research focuses on the reception of classical antiquity in American culture, a topic that stems from her research during an American Council of Learned Societies fellowship at Harvard University. She has written on Athena as a cultural icon in the United States in the book American Women and Classical Myths, ed. Gregory Staley (Baylor UP, 2009) and she is now working on a study of the enduring influence of Greek and Roman myths in American fiction and popular culture. At SPS Elzbieta teaches classes on 20th-century experimental East European and American fiction, on global postmodern fiction, and on 19th-century British fiction. In addition, she teaches literature seminars at the Newberry Library in Chicago, often on detective fiction.

Education

General Certificate of Education, London University
Ph.D. University of Warsaw, Poland
Postdoctoral ACLS Fellowship at Harvard University

Current Research Interests

Classical mythology in American fiction Classical antiquity in American culture Global 20th-C. experimental fiction
Jane Austen and the rise of the novel
Victorian detective, adventure, and travel fiction
The history of crime fiction
The use of detective fiction formulas in literary fiction
Food in 19th-C. American fiction

Selected Publications

“Futurological Philosophy: Stanislaw Lem.” Being Poland: A New History of Polish Literature and Culture since 1918, edited by Tamara Trojanowska, Przemyslaw Czaplinski, and Joanna Nizynska, (University of Toronto Press, 2018). 417-427.
“Henry James’s cultural capital: Rome as a moral testing ground in his 1870-1880 fiction,” City of the soul: The literary making of Rome, ed. Sabrina Norlander Eliasson and Stefano Fogelberg Rota, Suecoromana 8 (Stockholm, 2015). 123-133.
“’Transmuted by Time’s Handling’: Metamorphosis in James Branch Cabell’s Jurgen,” Metamorphosis and Place, ed. Joshua Parker, Lucie Tunkrova, and Mohamed Bakari (Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars, 2009), reprinted in Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism TCLC 314, ed. Lawrence J. Trudeau (Farmington Hill, MI: Gale Cengage Learning, 2015). 83-87.
“Liberating Woman: Athena as Cultural Icon in the United States,” American Women and Classical Myths, ed. Gregory A. Staley (Baylor UP, 2009)
“Stanislaw Lem” (2008); “Ryszard Kapuscinski” (2006), “John Barth” (2004) entries for The Literary Encyclopedia http://www.LitEncyc.com
“Literature,” International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, ed. William A. Darity, Jr. 2nd edition (Macmillan Reference USA/Thomson Gale, 2007)
“Classical Literatures and the Literary, Social, and Marketplace Culture of America 1820-1870,” American History through Literature, 1820-1870, ed. Janet Gabler-Hover and Robert D. Sattelmeyer (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2005)
“Henry James’s Cosmopolitan Spaces: Rome as Global City.” The Henry James Review. 24.3 (Fall 2003) "Ambiguous Heritage: Classical Myths in the Works of Nineteenth-Century American Writers," International Journal of the Classical Tradition Vol.1, No. 3 (Winter 1995)

Recognition

2018 Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences Community Excellence Award
2011-2012 Clarence Ver Steeg Award for supporting and mentoring graduate students

Recent Courses

Jane Austen and the Rise of the English Novel
Global Pomo: Postmodernist Fiction in the U.S. and the World
Facing Absurdity: 20th-C. Experimental Fiction from East Europe and the USA

James Hodge

James J. Hodge

Contact Information

james.hodge@northwestern.edu

James J. Hodge (he/him) is Associate Professor in the Department of English and the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities. He specializes in digital media aesthetics at the intersections of cinema, art history, and literary studies, especially experimental media art genres such as new media art, avant-garde film, and electronic literature. Focusing also on media and critical theory he has special interests in phenomenology and psychoanalysis (object relations).

His research is devoted to the broad question of how artistic forms express the incoherence of lived experience. His first book Sensations of History: Animation and New Media Art (Minnesota, 2019) argues that animation becomes crucial for understanding the ways in which history changes in the digital age. His current book project, ""Ordinary Media: An Aesthetics of Always-On Computing"" examines a range of experimental and popular digital artworks in their capacity to express the felt dynamics of always-on computing: from anxiety and sociability to productivity and vulnerability. This and other recent work attend to the explosion of new networked genres such as supercuts, selfies, and animated GIFs, and theorizes them as aesthetic strategies of provisional attunement to the vicissitudes of the historical present.

Education

Ph.D. University of Chicago

Current Research Interests

Digital Media Studies
Media Theory
American Film History
Film Theory

Selected Publications

Sensations of History: Animation and New Media Art (University of Minnesota Press, 2019) "Vernaculars," in A Concise Companion to Visual Culture, ed. A. Joan Saab, Aubrey Anable, and Catherine Zuromskis (Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell, 2021).
"The Subject of Always-On Computing: Thomas Ogden's 'Autistic-Contiguous Position' and the Animated GIF," Parallax 26:1 (2020): 65–75.
"Touch," with C. A. Davis and John Bresland (video essay, 20 minutes), Triquarterly (December 3, 2018).
“Earth-Specific Art: Phenomenology and the Digital Cinema of Peter Bo Rappmund,” ASAP/Journal 2:3 (2017): 579–601.
"Digital Psycho: Dedramatizing the Historical Event," Critical Inquiry 43:4 (Summer 2017): 839–860. "Sociable Media: Phatic Connection in Digital Art," Postmodern Culture 26:1 (September 2016): NP. "Gifts of Ubiquity," Film Criticism 39:2 (Winter 2014-15): 53-78.

Recent Courses

GIFs, Selfies, Memes: New Networked Genres
Media Theory

Larry Murphy

Larry Murphy

Adjunct Lecturer, Emeritus Professor

larry-murphy@northwestern.edu

lmseminary@aol.com

(847) 942-1279

Larry Murphy is emeritus professor of the History of Christianity at the Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary, on the Evanston campus of Northwestern University. His research and publications have focused upon various dimensions of African American religious history, leadership, and devotional practices. They include, among others, Sojourner Truth: A Biography, African American Faith in AmericaDown by the Riverside: Readings in African American Religion, (with Gordon Melton and Gary Ward) The Encyclopedia of African American Religions, and Piety and Liberation: AnHistorical Exploration of African American Religion and Social Justice, in Iva E. Carruthers, et.al., eds., Blow the Trumpet in Zion. He served as Director of PhD Studies at Garrett-Evangelical; as an historical consultant to the Blackside, Inc., multimedia project This Far By Faith, a six-part television series on the role of the black church and other African American faith communities in American history; as historical consultant, script consultant, and on the production team for the video Where Everyday Is Sunday, on the history and social witness of African American Churches in Chicago; and in his work as oral historian of African American religion, he and his research team have amassed an extensive collection of audio and videotape material, along with supportive documents and photographs. He is a long-standing member of the Executive Committee of the Society for the Study of Black Religion, an international organization of scholars and researchers. He received his PhD from the Graduate Theological Union/University of California, Berkeley.

Education

Ph.D., Graduate Theological Union/University of California, Berkeley

Current Research Interests

African American Social and Religious History
Oral History

Selected Publications

Encyclopedia of African American Religions
Sojourner Truth: A Biography
Down by the Riverside: Readings in African American Religious History

Recognition

Historical consultant, script advisor/editor, on-screen commentator to the PBS/Henry Louis Gates documentary on the black church, "The Is Our Story, This I Our Song

Recent Courses

Religion and the American Way.
Hollywood: Cinema, History, and the Construction of Religious Values
The Souls of Black Folk

 Anna Parkinson

Anna M. Parkinson

Adjunct Lecturer, Associate Professor of German

Contact Information

a-parkinson@northwestern.edu

Anna Parkinson is Associate Professor of German, a core member of the Critical Theory Cluster, and an affiliate of the Gender and Sexuality Studies Program and the Jewish Studies Program at Northwestern. She is currently completing on a series of essays addressing the Jewish-German author and psychoanalyst Hans Keilson's work in relation to post-Holocaust and more recent politicized conceptions of humanism. A second book project is linked to modalities of evidence in forensics and art, drawing on her involvement in the project “Trauma, Politics, and the Uses of Memory,” which was her contribution to the Andrew W. Mellon Project “Critical Theory in the Global South” (2017-2020) in the Program in Critical Theory at Northwestern; as well as forensics research and practice enabled by a Mellon New Directions Fellowship (2019-2020). Her teaching and research interests include: twentieth and twenty-first century German-language literature and film, critical theory, South African literature and photography, memory studies, forensic anthropology, literature of migration and exile, gender and queer theory, literary theory, genocide studies, and media of the Cold War era.

Education

Ph.D., German Studies, Cornell University
Certificate in Gender and Sexuality Studies, Cornell University

Current Research Interests

Migrant and exile literature
Affect theory and history of emotions
Postwar German literature and culture
Memory Studies Critical Theory (psychoanalysis,
Frankfurt School, poststructuralism, critical race theory)
Forensics, evidence and truth claims
Gender and Sexuality Studies
South African Literature, history, and culture German film studies
History and archive studies (critical fabulation, history of science, postcolonial studies, intellectual history)

Selected Publications

AN EMOTIONAL STATE: THE POLITICS OF POSTWAR WEST GERMAN CULTURE (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2015)
““In der Fremde zuhause”: Contingent Cosmopolitanism and Elective Exile in the Writing of Hans Keilson.” Eds. Richard Cohen, Ascher Biemann and Sarah Wobick. SPIRITUAL HOMELANDS: THE CULTURAL EXPERIENCE OF EXILE, PLACE AND DISPLACEMENT AMONG JEWS AND OTHERS. (Berlin: De Gruyter, 2019). 205-230.
Invited commentary (by Dagmar Herzog) for a feature in the journal Psychoanalysis and History in response to the question: “What is the Future of Psychoanalysis in the Academy?” PSYCHOANALYSIS AND HISTORY 20.1 (2018): 23-35, 28-9.
“Under the Sign of Caricature: Figuring Exile in Adolf Hoffmeister’s THE UNWILLING TOURIST (1941-42).” EXILFORSCHUNG 35 (2017): 192-210.
“A Sentimental Re-education: Postwar West Germany’s Intimate Geographies.” EMOTION, SPACE AND SOCIETY 25 (2017): 95-102.
“Adorno on the Airwaves: Feeling Reason, Educating Emotions,” GERMAN POLITICS AND SOCIETY, Special Issue on Radio and the Cold War, 32 no. 1 (Spring 2014): 43-59.
“The Death of the Adversary: Enduring Ambivalence in Hans Keilson’s Postwar Psychoanalytic Literature.” Eds. Simone Schröder, Ulrike Weymann, and Andreas Martin Widmann. “DIE VERGANGENE ZEIT BLEIBT DIE ERLITTENE ZEIT.” UNTERSUCHUNGEN ZUM WERK VON HANS KEILSON. Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann, 2013. 91-103.
“Aptitudes of Feeling: Ekphrasis as Prosthetic Mourning in Anne Duden’s Das Judasschaf,” NEW GERMAN CRITIQUE, Special Issue on Sites of Ambivalent Memory in Postwar Germany, 38 (2011): 39-63.
“Neofeminist Mütterfilm? The Emotional Politics of Margarethe von Trotta’s ROSENSTRASSE.” Eds. Jaimey Fisher and Brad Prager. THE COLLAPSE OF THE CONVENTIONAL: GERMAN FILM AND ITS POLITICS AT THE TURN OF THE NEW CENTURY. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2010. 109-135.

Recognition

Kaplan Fellow 2021-22, Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, Northwestern University
Mellon New Directions Fellowship, 2019-2020
Project Convener, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Grant: Critical Theory in the Global South (2017-2020) Invited participant, research workshop, "The Reception of the Jews in China during WWII (Holocaust Studies in China)," invited by the Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States
Holocaust Memorial Museum, NYU Shanghai and the Shanghai Jewish Refugees Museum, Shanghai, China, October 2018
Invited to give the 2018 Majors' Annual Lecture in the Department of Comparative Literature, Department of Comparative Literature, New York University, 2018 Weinberg College Distinguished Teaching Award, WCAS, Northwestern University, 2017-2018
AT&T Research Fellowship, Northwestern University, 2015-2017
Leon Milman Senior Fellow, Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, 2016
Trauma, Politics and the Uses of History (an interdisciplinary, transnational graduate seminar, taught in German and Comparative Literature Studies Program, and for the Critical Theory Cluster Certificate), Fall 2020

Angelo Restivo

Angelo Restivo

Contact Information

angelo.restivo@northwestern.edu

Vimeo

Angelo Restivo's work centers on aesthetics and political affect. Specifically, he looks at how, at the macro level, the moving-image work is expressive of larger social and economic shifts, while at the micro level, it registers and calibrates our affective relationship to everyday life. The moving-image objects he studies range from postwar and contemporary art cinemas, to postwar auteurs, to contemporary television.

In Restivo's first book, The Cinema of Economic Miracles, he proposed a new way of looking at the Italian art cinema of the 1960s, in light of both the profound spatial changes wrought by the economic miracle and the emergence of new social subjects. In ‘Breaking Bad’ and Cinematic Television, he performs a granular analysis of the series’ visual style in order to explore the ways in which it opens up to an allegorical examination of everyday life in neoliberal America. In the early 2000’s, Restivo coauthored, with Richard Cante, a series of essays on gay pornography, which used the films to track the evolution of the post-Stonewall gay male subject in the wake of urban decay and renewal, globalization, and the rise of neoliberalism.

Currently he is beginning to explore the video essay (as critical intervention): he just completed his first video essays, one of which is an accompaniment to his book on Breaking Bad.

Education

PhD. Critical Studies. School of Cinematic Arts. University of Southern California
MA. Program for Writers. University of Illinois, Chicago
BA. Humanities. University of Chicago

Current Research Interests

moving-image aesthetics
film-philosophy
urban space and the moving image
political affect
psychoanalysis
Deleuze Frankfurt School
videographic criticism
creative/critical writing

Selected Publications

'Breaking Bad' and Cinematic Television. Duke UP, 2019
The Cinema of Economic Miracles: Visuality and Modernization in the Italian Art Film. Duke UP, 2002 “How to Tell Time: Deleuze and Italian Cinema.” A Companion to Italian Cinema. Ed. Frank Burke. Blackwell, April 2017.
“The Optics of the Virtual.” For A Companion to Wong Kar-Wai. Ed. M. Nochimson. Blackwell, Jan 2016. “The Sound of Color/the Color of Sound: the Aesthetics of Passing Through”. Liquid blackness 2.5 (Sept 2015)
“Revisiting Zabriskie Point.” Antonioni: Centenary Essays. Ed. John David Rhodes, Laura Ricasoli. British Film Institute. 2011
“Hitchcock and the Postmodern.” A Companion to Alfred Hitchcock, ed. Leland Pogue, Thomas Leitch. Blackwell, 2011
“From Index to Figure in the European Art Film: The Case of The Conformist.” Global Art Cinema: New Theories and Histories. Ed. Rosalind Galt, Karl Schoonover. Oxford UP. 2010

Recognition

Board of Directors. Society for Cinema and Media Studies. 2011-2014
Fulbright Fellowship. Rome, Italy. 1989-90

Recent Courses

Film Noir and Its Afterlives

Bill Savage

Bill Savage

Contact Information

b-savage@northwestern.edu

Bill Savage (PhD Northwestern) has been teaching in the SPS MA Lit program for more than 15 years. He is a scholar of Chicago literature and culture, and his most recent publication is the co-edited and annotated edition of Chicago by Day and Night: The Pleasure Seeker’s Guide to the Paris of America (Northwestern UP, 2013). He also co-edited the 50th Anniversary Critical Edition of Nelson Algren’s The Man with the Golden Arm and the Annotated edition of Algren’s Chicago: City on the Make. He writes regularly for local publications, and is a lifelong resident of Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood.

Recent Courses

Richard J. Daley: The Man, the Myths, and the City
Mapping Chicago: Ideals and Deals, Plans and Poetry
Defining Chicago: Plans and Poetry from the City Beautiful to the City on the Make
Let's Play Ball

Dilip Gaonkar

Dilip Gaonkar

Contact Information

d-gaonkar@northwestern.edu

Dilip Gaonkar is a professor of culture and communication and the director of the Center for Global Culture and Communication. He also directs the Center for Transcultural Studies, an independent scholarly research network concerned with global issues. Gaonkar has two sets of scholarly interests: the intellectual tradition of rhetoric with both its ancient roots and its contemporary mutations and global modernities and their impact on the political. He is currently the executive editor of the journal Public Culture, and he has written and lectured widely on rhetoric, globalization, democracy, and the media. In addition to his work for the Department of Communications Studies, Gaonkar also serves as an adjunct faculty member in the Department of African American studies, an affiliate faculty member in the graduate program in Screen Cultures in Asian Studies, and a senior affiliate fellow at the Center for the Study of Developing Societies in Delhi, India.

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