IN FOCUS Seminars

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Our on campus IN FOCUS Seminars expose students to top Northwestern faculty and instructors highlighting themes relevant today. These two-week certificate seminars are structured like a college seminar course. Seminars feature discussions, readings and study; enabling a rich learning experience. Once you successfully complete your seminar you will receive an official Northwestern University transcript.

IN-FOCUS courses include access to our "Wildcat Connect: Get Ready Series". This series adds an additional robust co-curricular component to your schedule outside of the classroom with interactive workshops that will prepare you for college and integrate you into the Wildcat community!

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IN FOCUS Seminars

As our IN-FOCUS courses plan to be on campus for summer 2022, Northwestern’s College Prep Program is committed to protecting the health of our community while students experience what it’s like to take college courses in person, live on campus, and participate in impactful activities. However, if COVID-19 circumstances change, the modality of IN-FOCUS courses may change to an online format.

Genocide and Beyond: Where Is Justice?

Instructor: Jeff Rice  
Online Student Orientation: June 17 at 10 am CST  
In Person Program Dates: June 20 -July 1, M–F 
Time: 9 AM- 12: 15 PM CST 

Course Description  

As we have seen in recent years, international courts of justice have risen to the forefront of global response to genocides, civil wars and other crises which involve mass killings. From trying Nazis to the fomenters of the genocide in Rwanda, we watch government officials and ordinary people stand on trial charged with crimes against humanity. In this seminar, you will tackle recurring questions which arise before and during these trials. Where was the rest of the world while these killings occurred? What laws were broken? What are the standards of criminality and when does global justice take precedence over national sovereignty? You will begin with the origins of the law against genocide as well as the historical and philosophical roots of the principle of sovereignty. You will examine the cases of Rwanda and either Darfur or Syria and provide an historical understanding to the genocide; how these crises began and how they were fueled (both internally and through international action and neglect). Our findings will address whether the decision to try killers is easier than the decision to intervene in an effort to stop the killing. You will consider the advantages and disadvantages of the overall policy that the United Nations seeks to enact called “The Responsibility to Protect” or R2P. You will understand the relationship between civil wars and genocides asking the question of whether genocide is the intended result or a by-product of war. We will Investigate the complexity of international intervention: can it work, what are the long-term problems, does it violate norms of sovereignty, when is it necessary? You will analyze the effectiveness of post-genocide tribunals, the role of the International Criminal Court, the United Nations, and court proceedings in Rwanda. 

Academic Coursework
  • In preparation for each class: Submit a half page written reflection on the day’s topic, outlining your thoughts on the issue.
  • Beginning of each class: Brief lecture and discussion of the homework readings.
  • After each class: Record a one-two minute reflection video expressing how the class discussion affected your thinking.
  • Culminating Activity/Final Project: Choose one option from a list of genocides, conduct research, and present findings to the class.  
Activities

Lectures, group discussions, invited speakers, presentations, and journal writing assignments will be mixed together to develop a deeper understanding of humanitarian crises.

  • A scheduled 15 to 20 minute one-on-one writing feedback session with the instructor and teaching assistant.
  • Introduction to the origins and the unfolding of genocides through reading background material, survivor narratives, and watching documentary film footage. 
  • What causes Genocide? Is it true that religion is at the root of genocides? Do ethnic divides provide the preconditions? 
  • Are genocide and ethnic cleansing the same thing? Can we identify and stop genocides? How do we avoid them?
  • Previous field trips have included: Holocaust Museum in Skokie, Illinois.  
Notes
  • Are you a high school student who is interested in humanitarian issues, comparative history, Africa, or trans-national justice?
  • No previous knowledge of any of these issues is required — just passion.
  • Enrollment Capacity: 40 
“I enjoyed being able to have open conversations and learning about topics I'm passionate about in a safe and comfortable environment!” — 2021 Participant

Instructor Bio 

Jeff Rice is a Senior Lecturer in Political Science and African Studies. He has been at Northwestern since 1968 as an entering freshman and has been associated with the University in one way or another since then. He pursued graduate work at the University of Edinburgh in African Studies after completing a dissertation entitled "Wealth Power and Corruption: A Study of Asante Political Culture". He returned to Northwestern full time in 2001 teaching in the History and Political Science Departments and became a Weinberg College Academic Adviser. He retired from that position in August 2018 and is presently teaching full time in Political Science. His courses have included West African History, History of the 60's in the U.S., Marx & Weber, Politics of Africa, Military Strategy, the Politics of Famine, Student Protest and Free Speech, and Africa in Fact, Fiction and Film. 

So You Want to Be a Lawyer: Legal Analysis and Communication  

Instructor: Lesley Kagan Wynes 
Online Student Orientation: June 17 at 10 am CST  
In Person Program Dates: June 20 – July 1, M–F 
Time: 9 AM- 12:15 PM CST 

Course Description   
The American legal system is premised on the idea that legal rules are subject to creation, change, and interpretation. In our common law system, government actors and private citizens alike take part in the process of defining the legal principles and understanding how those principles apply to resolve disputes and controversies. In this intensive seminar, you will learn the fundamentals of creative legal interpretation, the cornerstone of law school learning, and the legal profession. This process of interpretation and re-interpretation of legal ideas (often called “thinking like a lawyer”) is what students learn through the Socratic dialogue in law school and must master to succeed on law school exams, and it serves as the foundation for oral and written communication in all areas of legal practice. You will preview the experience of law school and be introduced to strategies for successful student behavior on the pre-law and law school levels. Be prepared to conquer the college admission process and to maximize pre-law learning opportunities during the undergraduate years. Be inspired to select the professional path that best suits their personality traits, analytical strengths, and intellectual interests. 

Academic Coursework  
- In preparation for each class: Complete assigned readings and exercises. 
Each class: Mixture of lecture, group discussion, analytical exercises and reflection  
Culminating Activity/Final Project:  Legal Memorandum and a Torts Final Exam 
- Required Book:  Writing a Legal Memo by John Bronsteen 

Activities 
- Hone your critical thinking skills as you work on a client-based legal problem and communicate your analysis of how the law applies to the client’s problem in a clear, concise written form.  
- Develop teamwork and collaboration skills by working in groups inside and outside of class.  
- Learn practical perspectives on future careers in the law and insight into how the legal system operates. 

- Understand the unique ways that lawyers communicate with other lawyers, clients, and judges. 
- Field trips may include, if permitted: visit to Thompson Coburn, LLP to meet with practice lawyers, visit to Federal Courthouse, visit to Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law 

Notes  
- Are you a high school student interested in a career in the law or government and want to better their critical thinking and analytical skills? 
- No previous knowledge with any of the topics is required.  
- Enrollment Capacity: 40 
 
“Visiting a Federal Judge that was actually appointed by a president was amazing. It was very educational and exciting. I would never have been able to do on my own!” - 2021 Participant

Instructor Bio 

Lesley is an experienced leader with a passion for the development and training of professionals and the creation of seamless integration programs that enable professionals to become high-performing members of an organization. 

As Thompson Coburn's Chief Legal Talent Officer, Lesley leads the Firm's efforts to recruit attorneys in all of its offices, from lateral partners to associates and counsel, and to the law students selected for Thompson Coburn's summer associate program. 

Lesley leads a team of recruitment and professionals and collaborates with outside recruiters to identify candidates, guide them through the interview process, and determine whether a candidate is a professional and cultural match for Thompson Coburn. For lateral partners who accept an offer, Lesley serves as a key liaison between the partner and the multi-disciplinary administrative team that handles all logistics for a seamless partner transition, from conflicts checks and file transfer to billing and IT issues. 

Before joining Thompson Coburn, Lesley served in a number of senior leadership roles at Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management and Pritzker School of Law. Most recently she served as the Assistant Dean for Academic Experience at Kellogg, where she led a team responsible for the creation and delivery of customized tools, resources and support to enhance the academic experience of more than 3,000 graduate students across three campuses and multiple degree programs. Since 2004, she has served as a Clinical Assistant Professor, teaching courses in legal interpretation, communication and reasoning. 

How to Fix U.S. Politics?

Instructor: Andrew Roberts, PhD
Online Student Orientation: June 17 at 10 am CST
In Person Program Dates: June 20 -July 1, M–F
Time: 9 AM- 12:15 PM CST

Course Description

Americans are justly proud of their political system which produced the first modern democracy and has endured for over two centuries. But this political system also produced the Civil War, the most destructive conflict of its time, and arguably plays a role in all the problems the US suffers today from polarization and populism to increasing inequality. This course asks whether our political system has outlived its usefulness and should it be changed. Can we solve existing problems within the bounds of our current constitution and political institutions or is it time to go back to the drawing board? If they should be changed, what sort of changes should we make and what are the prospects of enacting them? This course will try to answer these questions.

You will learn about the origin and development of the American political system. You will analyze the different elements of the US constitution like the presidential form of government or our first-past-the-post electoral system and their effects on current politics. You will look at alternative political arrangements from countries around the world and consider how they would work in the US – things like parliamentary government or proportional representation. We will also consider what you as a citizen can do to make things better and what sort of actions are most likely to make a positive impact. Through it all you will learn how to think — that is, how to construct and critique explanations of politics and law.

Academic Coursework
- In preparation for each class: Complete assigned readings and be ready to discuss in class.
- Beginning of each class: Brief lecture and class discussion.
- Final Project: Create a presentation on a potential solution to our problems.

Activities
- Debates over the pros/cons of constitutional changes and the merits of American political institutions.
- Analyze different options for structuring a constitution; electoral rules, executives, legislature, judiciaries, federalism, and rights.
- Study a non-US constitution, write short reactions to readings, present a non-traditional political institution.
- Present recommendations for changes to the US political system.

Notes
- Are you a high school student interested in law, domestic and global politics, public policy, history, debate, and wanting to create an analytical argument?
- No previous knowledge of any of these issues is required.
- Enrollment Capacity: 40

“I enjoyed learning about real-world examples. The content was really interesting. It was a fun challenge to try to understand the politics of another country and try to draw connections to our own political systems.”- 2021 Participant

Instructor Bio
Andrew Roberts studies the quality of democracy, political institutions, and political behavior. Most of his research focuses on postcommunist Europe where he once taught English. His main research program has been understanding how democratic politics works in the region, particularly issues of representation and accountability. He is currently working on projects related to the influence of biography on politics, the effect of nationalism on citizenship, and the role of billionaires in politics. Outside of political science, he writes about popular culture in Europe and how to get a better college education.

Who Should Call the Shots in Bioethics? 

Instructor: Mark Sheldon, PhD 
Online Student Orientation: June 17 at 10 am CST  
In Person Program Dates: June 20 – July 1, M–F 
Time: 9 AM- 12:15 PM CST 

Course Description   
On a seemingly daily basis, we are confronted by stories in the media focusing our attention on the various studies of ethics pertaining to philosophical, social, and legal issues arising in medicine and biotechnology affecting human life; also known as bioethics. Many of these issues stand powerfully at the center of our political discourse, development of new technologies, increasing cost of medical care, and the level of doctor/patient relationship. In return, individuals start to ask questions: when does life begin, end, and should it end? Who should receive a heart transplant? What is our responsibility to the millions of individuals who do not have health insurance? Should medical resources be allocated based on age? What should doctors tell and not tell patients? How much confidentiality should be protected by the doctor/patient relationship? In this thought-provoking seminar, students will expand their ability to analyze the ethical dimensions of these challenging social issues: children, adolescents, physician/patient relationship, definition of death, end of life issues, human subject research, animal research, and allocation of health care. You will develop a perception and appreciation for the way philosophical analysis, skill of listening and argument can contribute to clarifying the ethical issues in complex and controversial topics in biotechnology and medicine. 

Academic Coursework  
- In preparation for each class: Prepare assigned readings 
Each class: Brief lecture and then discussion 
Culminating Activity/Final Project:  Written case analysis and two group projects involving resolution of assigned cases 

Activities 
Structured discussion of topic in question.  
Assigned readings: philosophy, medicine, and law journals.  
Debate representing different positions set out in assigned readings. 
Consideration of relevant real-life examples or court cases. 
- Previous field trips have included: Holocaust Museum in Skokie, Museum of Science and Industry, and lunch as a class off campus. 

Notes  
- Are you a high school student interested in philosophy, medicine, and public policy?  
- No previous knowledge with any of the topics is required.  
- The topics of discussion are intellectually, emotionally, psychologically complex and cause implications for all members of society.  
- Enrollment Capacity: 40 
 
“I enjoyed learning through Professor Sheldon; he made every class engaging and fun to be a part of. I also appreciated how he encouraged us to participate and ask questions at anytime.” - 2021 Participant

Instructor Bio 

Distinguished Senior Lecturer Emeritus in Philosophy and currently faculty in the Medical Ethics and Humanities Program, Feinberg School of Medicine. He received his PhD from Brandeis University, where he was awarded a Sachar Fellowship to study at Oxford University. He has served as Adjunct Senior Scholar at the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago, and Senior Policy Analyst at the American Medical Association. Formerly Professor of Philosophy and Adjunct Professor of Medicine at Indiana University (Northwest campus) and Indiana University School of Medicine, he currently serves as adjunct faculty and ethicist at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. Sheldon has published and presented talks on a variety of issues including informed consent, confidentiality, the forced transfusion of children of Jehovah's Witnesses, children as organ donors, disclosure, and the use of Nazi research. 

So You Think You Understand Reality? Quantum Mechanics and Relativity

 Instructor: Andrew Rivers  
Online Student Orientation: July 17th at 10 am CST 
In Person Program Dates: June 20th – July 1, M–F
Time: 9 AM- 12: 15 PM CST

Course Description 
In our world of intuitive everyday experience we travel together along a shared “time river” agreeing on what is happening now and when events happened in the past. We live in a world of predictable cause and effect - knowing the precise physical conditions, we can apply laws of physics and predict what happens next. According to our current theories of the physical world neither the shared time river nor the straight lines between cause and effect have basis in reality. In this course we will take a tour of the ideas that led us to a new scientific view of the world - theories that turned our intuitive understanding of reality on its head. We will examine the two foundational and revolutionary theories of modern physics - relativity and quantum mechanics exploring paradoxes that illuminate the contradictions between our intuitions and the world “as it is”. Quantum mechanics and general relativity have been enormously successful - making accurate experimental predictions, suggesting new phenomena and leading to technological development that revolutionized the world. Despite unprecedented success, uncertainty remains. Theoretical physicists still disagree on the foundations of quantum mechanics and how to resolve matters such as wave-particle duality, entanglement and the measurement paradox. Experimentalists continue to test the accuracy of General Relativity in observations of black holes and gravitational waves, looking for clues and tiny discrepancies. Additionally, in their current forms, the quantum mechanics and general relativity are incompatible with each other. The next generation of scientists may resolve these paradoxes and disagreements about the nature of reality. In this course we will examine the big questions and debate the road ahead.

Academic Coursework 

-In preparation for each class:  Complete readings and participate in on-line discussion boards.
- Beginning of each class: Breakout Sessions, Icebreakers, lecture, small group discussions, and interactive demonstrations.
- Culminating Activity/Final Project: Research a current scientific experiment or theoretical model, analyze the topic through the lenses explored in class, refine research topic, collaborate with professor and TA, and present research findings to the class. 

Activities
-In-class demonstrations will be used to elucidate concepts. For example, we will build our own spectroscopes, explore light    interference, and use class interactive demonstrations to explore physics concepts.
-Field trip to Adler Planetarium and to the Dearborn Observatory for nighttime observing. 
- Guest presentations from Northwestern experts.
- Invited panel of Northwestern undergraduates to discuss their experiences of scientific research at Northwestern.
- Scientific concepts will be supported by on-line readings and interactives organized on Northwestern’s Canvas Learning Management System.

Notes
 - Required books, purchase before course. 
-The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself, by Sean Carroll. ISBN–13: 978–1101984253
-Through Two Doors at Once: The Elegant Experiment that Captures the Enigma of Our Quantum Reality, by Anil Ananthaswamy. ISBN–13: 978–1101986097
- Enrollment Capacity: 40

“There's a lot of interesting reading materials given by the professor, and I'm able to interpret and evaluate all kinds of opposing or supporting perspectives towards one issue, which is really interesting.” - 2021 Participant

Instructor Bio
Dr. Andrew Rivers joined the Northwestern University Physics department in 1999 and has since taught a courses in physics and astronomy including the introductory physics sequence, Modern Cosmology, and Highlights of Astronomy. Andrew was awarded the Weinberg College Distinguished Teaching Award in 2008 and has been named to the Associated Student Government faculty-administrator honor roll 6 times. Andrew serves as a Weinberg College adviser and has been active in Northwestern's Residential College (RC) system, serving as Faculty Master of the Cultural and Community Studies RC from 2004-2009. He assisted in development of the Gateway Science Workshop program in physics and has worked on other curricular innovations within the Northwestern community. Andrew's Ph.D. research included a large scale radio survey of the so-called "Zone of Avoidance": his project revealed 20 previously unknown nearby galaxies.


Dynamical Systems and Chaos: The Mathematics of Change 

Instructor: Daniel Cuzzocreo, PhD 
Online Student Orientation: July 15 at 10 am CST  
In Person Program Dates: July 18-29, M–F 
Time: 2 PM- 5 PM CST 

Course Description  

The world is a chaotic place. All around us, our lives are governed by complicated systems that evolve over time; the weather, the stock market, and the neurons firing in our own brains. Sometimes these systems fall unto predictable patterns, but they are also predictably unpredictable, and math can tell us why. In this course, you’ll explore how systems governed by seemingly simple rules can lead to wildly complicated outcomes and how tiny changes now can lead to huge consequences later on.  You will use technology to predict and measure how simple quadratic expressions generate chaos and explore how different assumptions about interacting populations can affect their long-term survival. Along the way, you’ll learn about how these chaotic systems connect to other wild areas of mathematics, like imaginary numbers and fractal geometry. Topics may include: Discrete and Continuous Models, Predator-Prey Models, The Quadratic Family, and The Mandelbrot and Julia Sets. Students will also choose from a list of special topics (or find one of their own) to investigate in an in-depth final project.   

Academic Coursework  
- In preparation for each class: Read and annotate daily pre-reading assignment 
Beginning of each class: Brief lecture and discussion of the homework readings. 
After each class: Submit problem set or technology workshop activity 
Culminating Activity/Final Project: Choose a special topic as the subject of the final project, which will include written, oral, and technological components.  

Activities 
- Readings and lectures on the fundamental mathematical concepts.  
- Understand the ideas of dynamical systems and chaos.  
- Interactive technology demonstrations, projects, and group problem sessions.  
- Write models to represent real world systems with mathematics. 
- Create stunning fractal images based on simple formulas. 

Notes 
Are you a high-school student with pre-calculus skills interested in exploring topics beyond typical mathematical concepts offered at the high school level? 
- High-School level pre-calculus is required. 
- Enrollment Capacity: 40 

“I really enjoyed listening to my professor's answers to my peer's and my own questions. I found that I learned much more from him than I did from the textbook or youtube, and he taught in a way which was very inclusive of all academic backgrounds.” - 2021 Participant

Instructor Bio 

Dr. Daniel Cuzzocreo has been a Lecturer in the Department of Mathematics at Northwestern since 2015, and previously taught at Smith College in Massachusetts and Boston University. He earned a BA in Mathematics from Tufts University in 2009 and a PhD from Boston University in 2014. He has published several papers in the field of complex dynamical systems, he earned the Excellence in Teaching Award from the Northwestern Department of Mathematics, and he was recently named to the Associated Student Government Faculty and Administrator Honor Roll at Northwestern.  

How to Get Away With Murder: Forensic Chemistry 

Instructor: Shelby Hatch, PhD 
Online Student Orientation: July 1 at 10 am CST  
In Person Program Dates: July 4 – 15, M–F 
Time: 9 AM- 12:15 PM CST 

Course Description  

How does someone get away with murder? – or not? This course will explore forensic chemistry techniques from those used by Sherlock Holmes to modern spectroscopic methods. You will learn the basics of forensic chemistry through a series of murder mysteries both fictional and factual. Throughout the course, we will alternate between the theoretical underpinnings of various analytical methods and performing those analyses in the laboratory. We will read books, watch films, examine court documents, take a field trip, and welcome forensics experts into our classroom. 

Examples of forensic chemistry techniques we will study in this course are: analyzing samples taken at a fire to find the cause; illustrating different fingerprinting techniques; using trace metal analysis to connect bullets to the manufacturer and/or particular weapon; identifying paper through spectroscopic techniques; analyzing pigments from documents and taking samples from car accidents; using multivariate analysis; identifying tools from their steel composition. You will evaluate analytical techniques; use statistical and multivariate methods to distinguish complex chemical traces collected from crime scenes. You will also critically analyze results obtained with different methods with respect to selectivity, specificity and sensitivity. 

Academic Coursework 

- In preparation for each class: Expected to watch films, do readings, and prepare for laboratory experiments outside of class time. Outside of instruction hours, you will also be working on individual projects throughout the course and preparing a presentation to be shared at the close of the course. 
Beginning of each class: Taught as a combination of lecture, discussion, group work, individual projects, and laboratory experiments. In class, the primary focus will be on how forensic chemistry is (or can be) used to solve each of the murders presented. 
Culminating Activity/Final Project:  Present your individual project orally to the rest of the class and submit a final report. 

Activities 

- Recognize the chemistry that undergirds methods used to analyze findings secured at crime scenes (such as fingerprints, paint, and chemical residues). 
- Explain the chemistry involved in the analysis of chemical substances used in possible criminal activities and be able to use these analytical techniques. 
- Utilize the principles of the instrumental analytical techniques presented during the course. 
- Guests (e.g., medical examiner, forensic anthropologist) 
- Possible projects could involve studying and presenting a particular aspect of forensic chemistry not otherwise included in the course, learning about a forensic method in another area of science – e.g., DNA analysis or forensic genealogy, and/or exploring another “case study” (factual or fictional). 

Notes 
- Are you a high school student interested in using forensic chemistry to solve a murder? 
- No previous knowledge of topics is required. 
- Enrollment Capacity: 40 

“I enjoyed the lectures and discussions that I had with my peers because they were most helpful in the learning experience.” - 2021 Participant

Instructor Bio 

 Shelby Hatch is an Academic Adviser in Weinberg College and Assistant Professor of Instruction in the Chemistry Department at Northwestern University. Shelby earned a PhD from the University of Rochester in Biophysical Chemistry. Shelby’s current research focuses on “youth participatory science” in the field of sustainable and environmental chemistry. Shelby is one of the scientists on the “Poisoned Onion Project” (POP), an NSF-funded endeavor that studies heavy metal contamination in Chicago, with particular focus on how that contamination impacts communities of color and low-income areas of the city. POP researchers include high school students, teachers, community organizers, and university scientists. 

Investigating the Power of Ethics: Are There Two Sides to Every Issue? 

Instructor: Mark Sheldon, PhD 
Online Student Orientation: July 1 at 10 am CST  
In Person Program Dates: July 4- 15, M–F 
Time: 9 AM- 12:15 PM CST 

Course Description 

One could argue, as John Stuart Mill did in 19th-century England, that democracy depends on respect for reasoned argument and rational discourse. This course will introduce moral and political theory in the form of literature selected for balance and diverse perspective. For example, one of the issues we will analyze is the aftermath of the Tree of Life Synagogue shooting in Pittsburgh in 2018. Former US President, Donald Trump, declared we need to reinstate the death penalty. Many agreed, taking the view that there are some circumstances where the death penalty seems to be the only appropriate punishment. Others disagreed, claiming that the values of our country and Constitution prohibit or should prohibit the imposition of death as a form of punishment. You will be introduced to high-level writing that reflects thoughtful attempts to deal rationally with topics that too often are used as vehicles of division and political advantage. Issues include: affirmative action, the treatment of animals, hate speech and censorship, physician assisted death, abortion, and the just allocation of scarce medical resources, particularly in the time of Covid-19. Our frequent mature structured discussions and presentations will create intellectual stimulating conversations with diverse student perspectives to share ideas and analyzations. By the end of the course, you will develop an understanding of the nature associated with the controversial topics focused in the course. You will also acquire an understanding of how good arguments are constructed, how to further defend a stance, and how to subject good criticism. 

Academic Coursework  
- In preparation for each class: Complete assigned readings. 
Beginning of each class: Brief lecture prior to discussion of topic 
Culminating Activity/Final Project: Brief essay and group presentation  
 
Activities 
- Debate representing different positions set out in assigned readings. 
- Consideration of relevant real-life examples or court cases. 
- Written assignment. 
- Each week students will be placed in small groups to discuss, conduct research, and present their findings on Friday. 
- Previous field trips have included: Science and Industry and Holocaust Museum in Skokie, IL.  

Notes 
- Are you a high school student interested in philosophy, debate, and public policy?  
- No previous knowledge with any of the topics is required.  
- The topics under consideration have implications for all members of society. 
- Enrollment Capacity: 40 

“I really appreciated the frequent discussions that took place in the program. The ability to interact with my peers and their unique ideas really helped me to learn and improve my own knowledge and intellectual curiosity.” - 2021 Participant

Instructor Bio 

Distinguished Senior Lecturer Emeritus in Philosophy and currently faculty in the Medical Ethics and Humanities Program, Feinberg School of Medicine. He received his PhD from Brandeis University, where he was awarded a Sachar Fellowship to study at Oxford University. He has served as Adjunct Senior Scholar at the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago, and Senior Policy Analyst at the American Medical Association. Formerly Professor of Philosophy and Adjunct Professor of Medicine at Indiana University (Northwest campus) and Indiana University School of Medicine, he currently serves as adjunct faculty and ethicist at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. Sheldon has published and presented talks on a variety of issues including informed consent, confidentiality, the forced transfusion of children of Jehovah's Witnesses, children as organ donors, disclosure, and the use of Nazi research. 

Words Matter: Story and Social Justice 

 Instructor: James Richard O'Laughlin 
Online Student Orientation: July 1 at 10 am CST  
In Person Program Dates: July 4 - July 15, M–F 
Time: 2- 5:15 PM CST 

Course Description  

Narratives have the power to transform both tellers and listeners and to help shape, strengthen and sustain communities and nations. A number of recent discussions about social justice have focused on the importance of narratives, and on which narratives or stories are being told in various contexts and spaces. This course will explore narratives specifically in relation to struggles for social justice by analyzing the way they speak to social contexts. We'll start with an overview of ideas of social justice and ideas about narrative and then deepen that inquiry with close analysis of various kinds:  of one or two readings about the roles states and nations have played in determining which narratives of their own history are taught; and of various narratives that articulate perspectives on social justice, including short stories, narrative essays, historical narratives and short narrative poems, and which may include writers such as Rachel Ghansah, Audre Lorde, Martin Espada, Michelle Alexander, Natasha Trethewey, Lucille Clifton, and Sherman Alexie. Our goal will be to identify how different narrative strategies, in works from 1980 to the present in the United States, are used to articulate social justice perspectives in relation to their social contexts, especially regarding race, class, gender, and sexual identity. 

Academic Coursework 
- In preparation for each class: Complete assigned readings, take notes and have questions ready to discuss in class.  
Beginning of each class: Brief lecture and discussion of readings and assignments. 
Culminating Activity/Final Project:  Work in small groups to apply the analytic techniques and approaches of the course to one or two narratives beyond the class readings (a story, poem, essay, song lyric, short film, program, etc.) and present findings to the class. 

Activities 
- Utilizing the library’s online resources to read about social context. 
Write short responses to the readings on Canvas discussion boards 
- Receive instructor feedback on a short analysis of one of the readings.  
-Field trips may include (if permitted): DuSable Museum, the Illinois Holocaust Museum, or the Mitchell Museum. 

Notes 
- Are you a high school student interested in exploring how narratives relate to  justice and equity across social systems in our society? 
- No previous knowledge of any of these issues is required. 
- Enrollment Capacity: 20 

“I enjoyed the format of the small and large group discussions, everyone had insightful comments, and the readings were extremely interesting.” - 2021 Participant

Instructor Bio 
James O’Laughlin teaches in the Cook Family Writing Program and is a Weinberg College Adviser.  He has been named to the Associated Student Government (ASG) Faculty Honor Roll and has received the Distinguished Teaching Award from Northwestern’s School of Professional Studies. He has taught a wide range of courses, including: first-year seminars on environmentalism and on postcolonialism and writing in Ireland; modes of writing; reading and writing fiction; reading and writing creative nonfiction; and intermediate composition. 

So You Want to Explore Global Health Challenges? 

 Instructor: Michael Diamond, Ph.D. 
Online Student Orientation: July 1 at 10 am CST  
In Person Program Dates: July 4 – 15, M–F 
Time: 9 AM- 12:15 PM CST 

Course Description  

Diseases like COVID-19, Ebola and Diabetes know no borders. Both pathogens and lifestyles move around the world and the people of every country share the risks. The responsibility for ensuring the public health rests with governments at local, national and international levels. Existing health organizations are increasingly challenged by the scope and magnitude of the current and future threats to public health such as the COVID-19 pandemic; the emergence of new and more virulent infectious diseases; the threats of bio-terrorism; growing resistance to antibiotics; lack of basic infrastructure of water, sanitation and inadequate access to drugs in developing countries; and overabundance of foods and complications from affluence, leading to health problems such as diabetes in higher income countries.   

This course will examine the global epidemiology of these diseases and threats to the populations of the world, and the current technological and organizational strategies that have been established to respond. A series of diseases and geographical regions will be analyzed to consider how the international community uses technology and organizes its responses to current problems in global public health. Special attention will be given to examples of effective technologies and intervention strategies. 

Academic Coursework 
- In preparation for each class: Read and analyze academic articles and case studies and be prepared to discuss them in class. 
Beginning of each class: Brief lecture and discussion on the topic for the day. 
After each class: Write a page reflection of how the class discussion affected your thinking. 
Culminating Activity/Final Project: Write a final essay on lessons learned, design, and analyze a strategic intervention on a health issue of your choice.  

Activities 
- Utilize the epidemiology of infectious and chronic disease as a management tool. 
- Explore professional and volunteer opportunities. 
- Analyze the roles and benefits of specific technologies and how they are appropriately and sustainably integrated into public, private and civil society sectors in public health 
- Students are encouraged to form teams to design their own intervention strategies that help to reduce the burdens of disease and build and strengthen local communities. 
- Potential Guest Lecturers: Red Cross of Greater Chicago and Northern Illinois and UNICEF   
 
Notes 
- No previous knowledge of topics is required. 
- Enrollment Capacity: 40 

“I really appreciated the frequent discussions that took place in the program. The ability to interact with and engage with my peers and their unique ideas really helped me to learn and improve my own knowledge and intellectual curiosity.” - 2021 Participant

Instructor Bio 

For more than 40 years, Michael worked with global and local health, refugee, rehabilitation and social and economic development programs. For ten years, he managed the global program to eradicate polio for Rotary International in cooperation with the World Health Organization, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, UNICEF and national governments. He was the Division Manager of Humanitarian Programs of The Rotary Foundation of Rotary International and in that capacity, he managed over 2,500 Rotary Club projects per year.  For 17 years he worked with the international YMCA and lived in Bangladesh and Switzerland. In these positions, he worked directly in 45 countries and with people in more than 150 countries. He has supported student groups such as GlobeMed, Engineering World Health, Community Health Corps, Chicago Student Health Force, UNICEF Clubs, Red Cross Training Corps, and the World Health Imaging Alliance. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. His service to the Chicago community was recognized with the Public Service Award of the Institute of Medicine of Chicago in 2011. 

 

So You Want to Be a Doctor? 

Instructor: Sarah B. Rodriguez, PhD  

2 timeframes to choose from: 

program options
Session 2  Session 2 
Online Student Orientation: July 1 10 am CST Online Student Orientation: July 1 10 am CST 
In Person Program Dates: July 4 - 15, M–F  In Person Program Dates: July 4 - 15, M–F 
Time: 9 AM- 12:15 PM CST  Time: 1 PM- 4:15 PM CST 

Course Description  

What does it mean to be healthy, what is medicine, what does the practice of medicine look like in the United States, and how may the practice of medicine change in the future? By framing this course around these fundamental questions, we will explore what it means to be a medical professional, why someone chooses to become a doctor, what the path to medical school consists of, and what it is like to go to medical school. Health care is such an impactful matter to medicine, we will analyze how health care is paid for in the United States. As well as alternative models for funding health care, importance of medical codes of ethics, and what characteristics frame medical professionalism. You will articulate the importance of anatomy in undergraduate medical education and how bodies have changed. We will consider what it means to be healthy and the importance of non-physiological factors (such as social, cultural, and environmental) on who is at risk for ill-health. Further, we will also examine where medicine is heading in the future. Because the practice of medicine involves critically analyzing information and working in teams, you will participate in presenting, analyzing materials from a variety of sources, and working on team-based projects. 

Academic Coursework 
- In preparation for each class: Complete assigned readings, take notes and have questions ready to discuss in class.  
Beginning of each class: Brief lecture and discussion of readings and assignments. 
Culminating Activity/Final Project: Write a 2-page paper talking about 2 insights they gained from the course, with supporting materials (lecture, readings, etc). 

Activities 
- Describe the variety of methods used in medical research. 
- Appraise the importance of socioeconomic impacts on health and illness. 
- Become familiar with using medical journal indexes and critically reading medical journal articles and case studies. 
- Articulate the importance of working in teams to solve a problem. 
- Outline possible routes regarding the future of medical practice. 

Notes 
- Are you a high school student interested in issues and careers related to medical practice and health care systems? 
- No previous knowledge of any of these issues is required. 
- Enrollment Capacity: 20 
 
“The quality of the class was very top notch, and it was interesting learning from a college professor and 2 TA’s. There were also a lot of resources that came with the class.” - 2021 Participant

 Instructor Bio 

Sarah B. Rodriguez is a medical historian who focuses on women’s reproductive and sexual health since the early 20th century, and how history has framed current discourse. Her second book, The Love Surgeon: A Story of Trust, Harm, and the Limits of Medical Regulation, is from Rutgers University Press. Her first book, Female Circumcision and Clitoridectomy in the United States: A History of a Medical Treatment, was published in 2014. Rodriguez is currently working on the history of the ‘standard of care debate’ regarding the mid-1990s trials to reduce the likelihood of vertical transmission of HIV from mother to fetus and on the history of episiotomy as a standard of care. Her next project will concern the history of the International Confederation of Midwives and maternal health. 

Game Theory and Practice  

Instructor: Scott Ogawa, PhD 

2 timeframes to choose from:

program options
Session 3 Session 4
Online Student OrientationJuly 15 at 10 am CST Online Student OrientationJuly 29 at 10 am CST
In Person Program DatesJuly 1829, MF In Person Program Dates: August 112, MF
Time: 2 PM-5 PM CST Time: 2 PM-5 PM CST

Course Description  

You will apply tools of game theory to a wide range of domains, including economics, politics, and biology. We may even dabble in less serious stuff like sports and, well, games! Why do candidates focus on such a small group of voters? Why do trees have such big trunks? We will examine the answers to these questions through the lens of game theory. Whenever possible we will play games with a focus on the concept of Nash equilibrium and how to find it using a bit of mathematics. We will also investigate how well theory matches practice. We will not be learning how to play chess or poker, though if you enjoy games like this you will still likely find this course particularly interesting. Some of the games we will play are The Prisoner’s Dilemma, The P-Beauty Contest, The Battle of the Sexes, and The Ultimatum Game. You will be involved in frequent small group and class discussions that will enable effective problem-solving, critical thinking, and peer interactions. Specific topics will include: rationalizability, backward induction, commitment, and evolutionary stability. You will acquire a better understanding of strategic interactions as they take place all around us. 

Academic Coursework 
- In preparation for each class: Nightly readings and group problem sets. 
Beginning of each class: Students present their solutions. 
Culminating Activity/Final Project: Each student will create their own a game and have the opportunity to play it in class.  

Activities 
- Structured discussions.  
- Collect data and analyze results. 
- Use mathematics to derive the equilibrium in games played with peers. 
- Model real-world scenarios, apply newly acquired theories and solution concepts to economics, politics, and biology. 

Notes 
- Enrollment Capacity: 40 

“I enjoyed game theory, being able to put theories into practice is crucial for understanding the topic. I also enjoyed the overall formatting and difficulty of the class. Each activity and lesson felt purposeful and challenging, but not overwhelming.” - 2021 Participant

 
Instructor Bio 

Scott Ogawa's research focuses on the economics of education and the decisions of students and teachers. He has applied the techniques of experimental economics to ask whether students who pay more for their education put forth more effort. More generally, he is interested in the behavioral effects of price on product utilization. He has been a fellow for the Searle Center for Teaching Excellence. Prior to attending graduate school, Scott taught high school math and economics at Lakeside School in Seattle. Scott sits on the AP Microeconomics Development Committee. 

How to Make Better Decisions With Math

Instructor: Daniel Cuzzocreo, PhD 
Online Student Orientation: July 15 at 10 am CST  
In Person Program Dates: July 18- 29, M–F 
Time: 9 AM- 12 PM CST 

Course Description 

We’re always told by teachers that math is all around us, but the real world never looks anything like a math textbook. When you need to make real decisions, like how to pay for college, what kind of insurance to get, or a new miracle drug could really be as good as it sounds, you may believe that thinking analytically should lead to better outcomes than relying on a hunch. But you also know that in life, no one is there to tell you which formula to use, or to give you all the data you need in a handy boxed chart, or even to mark your final decision as “right” or “wrong.” You’re on your own and need to “decide how to decide.” This course is all about solving real world problems in a real way, using imperfect data, making messy assumptions, keeping biases in check, knowing when you can and can’t generalize your conclusions, but all the while basing the entire decision-making procedure on rigorous mathematical techniques and ideas.   

Academic Coursework  
- In preparation for each class: Read and annotate daily pre-reading assignment. 
Beginning of each class: Brief lecture and discussion of the homework readings. 
After each class: Submit a problem set. 
Culminating Activity/Final Project: Choose a special topic as the subject of the final project, which will include written, and oral components. 

Activities 
- Readings and lectures on the fundamental mathematical concepts.  
- Understand how to think quantitatively, and get comfortable with solving problems that don’t have a “right answer”. 
- Find primary sources, analyze data, and learn how to fill in the gaps when all of the info you need isn’t out there. 
- Write models to represent real world scenarios with mathematics. 

Notes 
- Enrollment Capacity: 40 

“I really enjoyed listening to my professor's answers to my peer's and my own questions. I found that I learned much more from him than I did from the textbook or youtube, and he taught in a way which was very inclusive of all academic backgrounds.” - 2021 Participant

Instructor Bio 

Dr. Daniel Cuzzocreo has been a Lecturer in the Department of Mathematics at Northwestern since 2015, and previously taught at Smith College in Massachusetts and Boston University. He earned a BA in Mathematics from Tufts University in 2009 and a PhD from Boston University in 2014. He has published several papers in the field of complex dynamical systems, he earned the Excellence in Teaching Award from the Northwestern Department of Mathematics, and he was recently named to the Associated Student Government Faculty and Administrator Honor Roll at Northwestern.  

How Can Computer Science Intersect With Race, Power, and Ethics? 

Instructor: Natalie Araujo Melo 
Online Student Orientation: July 15 at 10 am CST  
In Person Program Dates: July 18- 29, M–F 
Time: 2- 5 PM CST 

Course Description 

Why should we care about ethical questions with respect to technology? 

Computing technologies shape our personal, social, and political lives in increasingly complex and consequential ways. Providing tremendous benefits (e.g. convenient access to information, connecting to one another across time and space) and harms (e.g. biased decision-making, mass surveillance, disinformation campaigns, and exclusion from critical material opportunities) that are important to examine and understand. 

At the same time, these technologies are born and shaped by the societies in which they are developed. Thus, grappling with the ethics of technologies (i.e considering the harms and benefits, how and why they were created in the first place, and how and to what ends they are used) is important not only for ultimately creating more moral technologies but a more moral society. Thus, our approach to the ethics of computing technologies requires a multifaceted assessment of their harm and benefit to our individual, cultural, and political lives, and simultaneously a critical examination of the values, ideologies, and contexts through which computing technologies emerge. You will consider some of the intended and unintended consequences of computing applications within our communities, institutions, and social systems (e.g. schooling, employment, policing, transportation, business, etc.). This involves paying attention to who wins and who loses, as well as how these technologies might amplify existing marginalities and privileges. 

Academic Coursework  
In preparation for each class: Complete assigned readings, take notes to prepare for in-class discussions, and answer questions in Identity Journals. 
Beginning of each class: Brief lecture, in-class discussions, and interactive activities examining various technologies. 
Culminating Activity/Final Project: A prototype or short film related to topics in the course.  
 
Activities 
- Engage in critical reading across a range of topics drawn from computer science and HCI, education and learning sciences, as well as ethics and philosophy. 
- Recognize the value judgements and subjectivities that undergird a wide variety of technical practices (e.g. sampling, data collection practices, categorization and classification, prediction, system design, etc.). 
- Examine the design choices and tradeoffs that various computing infrastructures make (and have made) in relation to important societal values (e.g. individual autonomy, free speech, equity, privacy, justice, security, access to opportunity, etc.). 
- Develop a variety of analytic lenses for examining computing technologies in terms of their social, ethical, and political consequences. 

Notes 
- Are you a high school student interested in learning a solid foundation for thinking about the possibilities, risks, and impacts of computer-mediated infrastructures on society? 
- No previous knowledge with any of the topics is required.  
- Enrollment Capacity: 40 

“I really enjoyed the lectures; I was really interested in the way the professor presented the material. I was given the opportunity to draw my own conclusions.” - 2021 Participant

Instructor Bio 

Natalie Araujo Melo (she/they) is a PhD student in the joint Computer Science and Learning Sciences program at NU. Prior to NU, Natalie worked with a large introductory computer science course at Yale University, where she managed over 40 teaching assistants and taught multiple summer sessions of the course. Her interests lie in examining technology learning in the intersections of power, relationality, identity, and Critical Race Theo

What’s Your Problem? Innovative Problem Solving Through Design Thinking and Communication 

Instructor: Alex Birdwell and Michele Zugnoni 
Online Student Orientation: July 29 at 10 am CST  
In Person Program Dates: August 1-12, M–F 
Time: 9 AM- 12 PM CST  

Course Description  

Like to problem-solve? Curious how things work? Wish you could express yourself so others immediately get what you’re saying? Want to use your creativity and ideas to make the world a little better? Then Intro to Design Thinking and Communication is for you! 

You’ll discover how to put your ideas into motion by working on a team project with other like-minded individuals to design a solution that solves a real-world problem. You’ll learn how to conduct research on the problem at hand, how to refine the creation process, how to write up how you arrived at your solution, and effectively communicate your great plan to an audience. Understand the iterative, user-centered design process used to solve real-world design problems. Whether you’re interested in becoming an engineer, want to improve your thinking and communication skills, or like working with others to solve problems, Intro to Design Thinking and Communication is a first step in the right direction.  

Academic Coursework  
- In preparation for each class: Complete assigned readings and be prepared to share team’s updates with class. 
Beginning of each class: Brief lecture prior to discussion of topic 
Culminating Activity/Final Project: Work effectively on a team to design, communicate findings, and solutions. 
 
Activities 
- Brief introductory lectures on the engineering design process, discuss relevant readings, impart research skills, offer peer editing of students’ writing, and revise documents after receiving feedback. 
- Frame a problem and determine the needs of a user population. 
- Conduct and analyze findings from research. 
- Generate alternatives by participating in established Ideation techniques. 
- Present ideas and obtain feedback through peer reviews and instructor meetings. 
Tour of the Ford build, home to the engineering program at Northwestern. 
- Guest Speakers: May include upperclass students who have taken DTC at Northwestern, alumni who are professional engineers, librarians, and other faculty from Northwestern University. 

Notes 
-Are you a high school student interested in innovative and creative problem solving and want to build their communication toolkit to inspire others with their vision? 
- No special expertise is required. 
- Enrollment Capacity: 30  

“I enjoyed the brainstorming process the most because it gave everyone a chance to participate and help us all work together.” - 2021 Participant

Instructor Bio 

Alex Birdwell is immensely passionate about teaching and has covered an array of courses within the mechanical engineering department and the Segal Design Institute. His current courses focus on user-centered design, capstone experience for mechanical engineering students, and promoting anti-racism through Art and Making. Alex strives to engage his students with real-world applications and examples, open dialogue and discussions during class, and unique classroom demonstrations created with everyday objects. His teaching methods seek to bridge the gap between knowledge students already possess and new concepts that challenge and expand existing mindsets. 

Alex is an academic advisor and works with students in the Manufacturing and Design Engineering (MaDE) program. He has previously served as an advisor in Mechanical Engineering and for first-year students across all engineering disciplines. His advising model centers around helping students define their objectives while working with them to become self-sufficient individuals balancing multiple commitments and discovering an optimal path for their time at Northwestern and beyond. 

  

Michele Zugnoni teaches with two goals in mind: (1) help her students learn to enjoy writing by engaging their own voice and knowledge; and (2) teach her students fundamental writing skills important to their continued success in writing at the university level and beyond. Michele strives to create a safe space in each of her classes, where students come to understand that they have a voice and their voice matters. Currently, Michele teaches classes in Design Thinking and Communication, Writing and Speaking in Business, and LGBTQ in Popular Culture through Northwestern University’s Cook Family Writing Program. 

Michele’s teaching and research are focused on reflection and collaboration. Michele calls upon her students to develop new knowledge about themselves and their coursework through individual and team-based reflections. For her dissertation, Michele considered the narrative experiences of first-generation college students, and in particular, how writing teachers can help first-generation students cultivate a sense of community and professional identity in the writing classroom. Michele’s first-generation students worked in small groups, writing about their experiences and sharing their insights with their peers. They formed important bonds with each other and found a place of belonging within the university. Michele learned a lot from her students, and she draws upon this knowledge in her teaching. 

Alex and Michele currently serve as the co-directors for Design Thinking and Communication (DTC). DTC is a joint endeavor between the McCormick School of Engineering and the Weinberg School of Arts and Sciences that introduces students to the user-centered design process in addition to technical and professional communication. 

So You Think This Stuff Is Easy? Using the Science of Psychology to Raise a Virtual Child 

Instructor: Alissa Levy Chung, PhD 
Online Student Orientation: July 15th at 10 am CST  
In Person Program Dates: July 18 – 29, M–F 
Time: 2-5 PM CST 

Course Description  

Have you ever wondered what makes someone a good parent or if your parents are doing things “right”? There is actually a science to parenting, but a lot of what parents worry about (violin lessons or trumpet? Travel soccer or club? Should I get an SAT tutor or enroll in a prep class?) has very little to do with how well their children develop. In this class, you will learn about research on parenting and get a chance to try it yourself with the My Virtual Child program. You will create your own virtual child, name your child, and raise your child to adulthood. Will your child resemble your personality, appearance, or not? Will you be nurturing? Strict? Indulgent? You will be asked a series of questions along the way, make decisions for your child and each decision will slowly shape the trajectory of your child’s life.  

You will work in small groups, each choosing a different kind of parenting style to learn the consequences of different kinds of decisions. Your choices will be grounded in research, we will also analyze the flaws in our research, such as limited information on parenting and child development outside of the U.S. Through these analyses, you will comprehend the science of parenting, how to think about your childhood experiences the way a psychologist would, and how parenting may differ in meaningful ways in other cultures. You will also receive writing and scientific thinking feedback from your professor. 

Academic Coursework 

- In preparation for each class: Academic readings before class and preparation for final project.  
Beginning of each class: Brief lecture and small group discussions. 
Culminating Activity/Final Project: Group presentation of the journey you experienced with your children. As a class, we will write to the company that produces the program to suggest areas of improvement.  

Activities 
- Raising a virtual child: guided group work and discussion to apply class findings to raising a “real” child. 
- Lectures, discussions, video examples, examine popular books and films regarding parenting and child development. 
- Written responses to discussion questions.  
- Condition permitting: Child observation   

Notes 

-Are you interested in learning how parenting techniques affect a human psychologically through childhood and beyond? 
-No previous knowledge of content is required. 
- Enrollment Capacity: 40 

 “I loved Professor Chung! She was warm but also held high standards for our work, both of which were beneficial to my engagement and performance in my course.” - 2021 Participant

 Instructor Bio 

Alissa Levy Chung is a clinical and developmental psychologist who received her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota (Institute of Child Development and Clinical Psychology). She is joining the department as an Associate Professor of Instruction. Her early research focused on the intergenerational transmission of parenting and the role of early experience in the development of psychopathology. For the past several years, she shifted her focus to teaching and was an award-winning teacher as a member of the adjunct faculty in the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern, teaching courses in developmental and clinical psychology. Previous teaching experience also included participating in the development of and teaching classes in the infant mental health specialty program at Erikson Institute in Chicago. For the past 21 years, Alissa has been a licensed clinical psychologist in private practice, working with children, adolescents, adults, and families throughout Evanston, Chicago, and the North Shore. She is active in the Evanston public schools and has been a special education advocate for families. 

Community Health: Achieving Global Impact Through Local Engagement 

Instructor: Michael Diamond, Ph.D. 
Online Student Orientation: July 15 at 10 am CST  
In Person Program Dates: July 18 – 29, M–F 
Time: 9 AM -12 PM CST 

Course Description  

Controlling infectious diseases and reducing chronic diseases are no longer just the responsibility of national governments, private health care institutions, city departments of public health, or community physicians. COVID-19, heart disease, strokes, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases, obesity and diabetes, substance abuse such as opioids, tobacco and alcohol, and a range of health safety issues are now the major causes of death throughout the world. In addition, especially in low resource countries and communities, people are especially vulnerable to infectious diseases such as COVID-19, HIV and AIDS, Zika, Ebola, Malaria, Tuberculosis, Diarrheal diseases, as well as other viruses, parasites and antibiotic resistant bacteria. With the understanding that a healthy society is also a more economically productive society, there is an increased emphasis on reducing the burden of disease in local communities throughout the world. As a result, there is an enormous increase in the number of community service programs that are being implemented by the three sectors of society, public, private and civil society.  
 
This course provides an opportunity to evaluate a community service program in Chicago that addresses a global health issue. You will study global and local mechanisms and patterns of the circulation of disease, and their relation to environmental, cultural, socio-economic, and political influences. You will explore roles and programs of global and local public, private and civil society sectors in addressing specific health issues. You will be expected to identify a local organization or program prior to the start of the course, with which you would like to volunteer. You will examine the programs and the geographical regions of these organizations and identify the specific opportunities and roles that are available to you as a volunteer. Special attention will be given to understanding due diligence, accountability, and mechanisms for measuring impact. 

 

Academic Coursework 
- In preparation for each class: Read, analyze academic articles, and research your organization. Be prepared to discuss in class.  
Beginning of each class: Brief lecture and discussion on the topic for the day. 
After each class: Write a page reflection of how the class discussion affected your thinking.  
Culminating Activity/Final Project: Write a final essay on final lessons learned and recommendations on how to strengthen the impact of your organization.  

Activities 

- This course involves the study of a community health related organization. 
- Lectures on community health interventions, discussions of readings and evaluation of their community impact.  
- Discussions of strategies that help to reduce the burdens of disease and build and strengthen local communities.  
- Understand the value of collaboration between public, private and civil society sector organizations. 
- Measure the goals defined by the organization to help meet its mission. 
- Potential Guest Lecturers: Rotary International, UNICEF, and Abbott Fund 

Notes 
- No previous knowledge of topics is required. 
- Enrollment Capacity: 40 

“There's a lot of interesting reading materials given by the professor, and I'm able to interpret and evaluate all kinds of opposing or supporting perspectives towards one issue, which is really interesting.” - 2021 Participant

Instructor Bio 

For more than 40 years, Michael worked with global and local health, refugee, rehabilitation and social and economic development programs. For ten years, he managed the global program to eradicate polio for Rotary International in cooperation with the World Health Organization, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, UNICEF and national governments. He was the Division Manager of Humanitarian Programs of The Rotary Foundation of Rotary International and in that capacity, he managed over 2,500 Rotary Club projects per year.  For 17 years he worked with the international YMCA and lived in Bangladesh and Switzerland. In these positions, he worked directly in 45 countries and with people in more than 150 countries. He has supported student groups such as GlobeMed, Engineering World Health, Community Health Corps, Chicago Student Health Force, UNICEF Clubs, Red Cross Training Corps, and the World Health Imaging Alliance. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. His service to the Chicago community was recognized with the Public Service Award of the Institute of Medicine of Chicago in 2011. 

Follow the Yellow Brick Road: Writing for College Success

Instructor: Charles Yarnoff, PhD
Online Student Orientation: July 29 at 10 am CST
In Person Program Dates: August 1 – 12, M–F
Time: 9 AM- 12 PM CST

Course Description

Are you a high school student interested in improving your writing to help prepare yourself for college? This course teaches practical and effective strategies for writing at the college level. You will learn about the conventions of writing in a range of academic disciplines, close analysis of texts, research-based persuasive essays, and techniques for drafting and editing your papers. Examples of high-level readings and writing assignments from various Northwestern University courses will be incorporated, along with handouts on editing techniques. Through creative exercises, peer editing, and discussion of thought-provoking articles, you will develop advance critical thinking skills and learn to communicate your ideas clearly and persuasively.

 In addition to preparing yourself for writing papers in college, you will have the opportunity to work on producing a draft of your college admission essay. By reading examples of successful college admission essays, you will learn and apply methods for presenting college admissions officers with a compelling picture of who you are as an individual.

Academic Coursework
- In preparation for each class: Submit a page of notes or a rough draft of an essay in response to prompts related to the day's topic.
- Beginning of each class: Brief lecture and discussion on the topic for the day
- After each class: Write a page of notes or record a three-minute reflection video expressing how the class discussion affected your thinking.
- Culminating Activity/Final Project: (1) A revision of your essay on the short story "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas," and (2) A draft of your college admission essay.

Activities
- Brief lectures on writing topics, discussion of readings, peer editing, and daily in-class writing.
-Write a draft of an analytical essay, receive feedback on it, and revise it.
-Read examples of college admission essays, create your own draft, and receive feedback on it.
-Hear about college writing from NU faculty and student guest speakers.
- Take a field trip to the Northwestern University library.

Notes
- No previous knowledge of college writing is required.
- Enrollment Capacity: 40

“It's a pleasure to be taught by professor Yarnoff! Also, my confidence in English writing improved. I've been nervous because I'm not a native speaker. His approval has helped me a lot”- 2021 Participant

Instructor Bio

Charles Yarnoff, who received his PhD from Northwestern University, teaches a wide variety of undergraduate writing courses, including Intermediate Composition, Writing and Speaking in Business, and Freshman Seminars.

He was named a Charles Deering McCormick University Distinguished Lecturer, an award recognizing faculty members who “have consistently demonstrated outstanding performance in classroom teaching.” He has been voted to the Associated Student Government faculty honor roll three times, has been nominated for the freshman advising award, and has received the Distinguished Teaching Award from Northwestern's School of Professional Studies.

Dr. Yarnoff especially enjoys teaching students who are preparing for and starting out in college. He has been a freshman advisor in Weinberg College at Northwestern since 2000, and is the academic director of the Summer Academic Workshop, a writing seminar for incoming Northwestern freshmen. He has taught InFocus seminars in the College Prep Program since 2014.

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