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Program Overview

Prephysical Therapy Completion Program

Prephysical Therapy Completion Program

The Prephysical Therapy Completion Program is intended for students who have completed some, but not all of the core science prerequisites needed to apply to physical therapy school. Students in this program may take their remaining core classes through SPS and receive the same student services as those in the prephysical therapy post-baccalaureate program. This program is not intended as a records-enhancement program. Students who have already applied to physical therapy school or completed all their prephysical therapy coursework should not apply.

Students must complete the program within 12 calendar months and be enrolled in at least two units of coursework per term to be eligible for financial aid.

Students who plan to enroll in this program during the summer immediately following the completion of their undergraduate degree may not be eligible for financial aid during that summer, depending on previous aid awards for that academic year.

 

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About the Prephysical Therapy Completion Program

Prephysical Therapy Completion Program Required Courses

Course plans will vary based on each student’s previously completed coursework. The courses listed below are necessary prerequisites for Physical Therapy graduate programs. Upon admission into the program, students should consult with their academic advisor to create a plan of study. In order to receive a letter of completion, students must complete their individual required courses as determined in the initial advising meeting and must complete a minimum of 4 units with a 3.0 GPA.

Courses are selected from the following:

  • BIOL SCI 170 Concepts of Biology
  • BIOL SCI 217 Physiology
  • BIOL SCI 313 Human Anatomy
  • BIOL SCI 316 Human Structure and Function
  • BIOL SCI 317 Regional Human Anatomy Lab
  • BIOL SCI 318 Advanced Human Physiology*
  • CHEM 110 Quantitative Problem Solving for Chemistry
  • CHEM 131 General Chemistry 1 (with lab, CHEM 141)
  • CHEM 132 General Chemistry 2 (with lab, CHEM 142)
  • PHYSICS 130-A College Physics I (with lab, Physics 131-A)
  • PHYSICS 130-B College Physics II (with lab, Physics 131-B)
  • PHYSICS 130-C College Physics III (with lab, Physics 131-C)
  • STAT 202 Introduction to Statistics

Due to Northwestern Department of Chemistry policy, students may not begin a chemistry course in the middle of a sequence. Students who need to complete a chemistry course must take the entire sequence at SPS. 

View Prephysical Therapy Completion Program Courses

Transfer Credit Policy for Prephysical Therapy Completion Program

Transfer credit is not accepted into this program. However, the program’s flexibility allows students to enroll in only the courses that they need.

Prephysical Therapy Completion Program Tuition

Post-baccalaureate students at Northwestern's School of Professional Studies pay per course. For more information about financial obligations and tuition, please visit the Tuition page.

Admission for Prephysical Therapy Completion Program

In addition to completing an online application, you'll also need to submit a few supplemental materials. A list of requirements for admission including application deadlines and tips on how to apply can be found on the Admission page.

Prephysical Therapy Completion Program Registration Information

Whether you're a first-time registrant or current and returning student, all students register using our online student registration and records systems. Important information about registering for courses at SPS, including registration timelines and adding or dropping courses in which you are already enrolled, can be found on the Registration Information page.

Prephysical Therapy Completion Program Sample Course Plans

View the Prephysical Therapy Completion Program Sample Course Plans here.

Find out more about the Prephysical Therapy Completion Program

Program Courses:Course Detail
Concepts of Biology <> BIOL_SCI 170-CN

This course will introduce the fundamental concepts of biology, including: Chemical composition and organization of living material, cellular organization, energy conversion by organisms, genetics and reproduction, ecology, evolution, and other topics. These topics will build the foundation needed for students to further explore the biological sciences. Through a mixture of lecture and discussion, students will apply the knowledge from the course into critical analysis of the scientific method and hypothesis testing. There are no course prerequisites; the course is geared toward students with an interest in the topic but without a background in biological sciences.


View BIOL_SCI 170-CN Sections
Concepts of Biology <> BIOL_SCI 170-DL

This is an introductory general biological sciences course. Topics include evolution, biomolecules, cell biology, genetics, population biology, and the relationship between structure and function in organisms. The significance of core concepts in relation to practical life applications will be discussed. Teaching methods will be varied, with an emphasis on lecture with also time for discussion. Evaluation will include several tests. Students will write about, and give presentations on, topics of their choice. There are no course prerequisites; the course is geared toward students with an interest in the topic but without a background in biological sciences. This course is conducted completely online. A technology fee will be added to tuition. 


There is no available section.
Physiology <> BIOL_SCI 217-CN

This course is the second in a four-course sequence that is completed by BIOL SCI 308 in the winter and BIOL SCI 219 in the spring. The physiology course covers organization and functioning of the major organ systems in mammals.

Schedule note: The first class session will be Monday, September 28.

A lab course, BIOL SCI 220 Genetic and Molecular Laboratory, may be taken concurrently with this course. Prerequisite: CHEM 131.


View BIOL_SCI 217-CN Sections
Human Anatomy <> BIOL_SCI 313-CN

This course is an introduction to human anatomy. Topics include: system approach to anatomical organization; sections of the body; musculoskeletal and nervous systems; embryology development. Lectures are supplemented by selected prosections of human cadavers and dry exercises using bones, models, and computer animations. Prerequisite: BIOL SCI 165, 170, or equivalent course.


View BIOL_SCI 313-CN Sections
Human Anatomy <> BIOL_SCI 313-DL

This course is conducted completely online.This is a course on human anatomy, focusing on morphology and function. It follows both a regional and systems approach. All course content, activities, and assessments will be online learning activities and assessments. The course will also have a broad emphasis on clinical application that is applicable to all health care professions. The course covers gross anatomy of the human body; therefore, images of human cadavers will be presented in your textbook, as well as in other course resources. Readings are assigned from the Marieb, Wilhelm and Mallatt text. Prerequisite: BIOL SCI 165, 170, or equivalent course.

This course will be conducted completely online. A technology fee will be added to tuition. There will be optional online office hours on Thursday from 6:15-9:15pm.


View BIOL_SCI 313-DL Sections
Human Structure and Function <> BIOL_SCI 316-CN

Students will gain a good working knowledge of the function of the musculoskeletal system in modern humans in this course, along with a comparative perspective emphasizing the adaptive contexts of the evolutionary transformations leading to our modern anatomy. The course examines the structural, functional, and evolutionary anatomy of humans, with primary focus on the musculoskeletal system of the postcranium. The regional anatomy of the muscles, bones and joints in the human body serves as a basis for more general biomechanical principles of anatomical systems. Discussions of the development evolution and clinical significance of human structure complement the functional emphasis on these anatomical regions. Class lectures are supplemented by selected prosections of human cadavers, in-class lab sessions examining bones and models, and computer animations and exercises. Prerequisite: BIOL SCI 313, equivalent anatomy course, or permission of instructor. Class is limited to 15 students.


View BIOL_SCI 316-CN Sections
Regional Human Anatomy Lab <> BIOL_SCI 317-CN

This is a lab course utilizing prosections and demonstrations of human cadavers. It is an advanced anatomy course examining the details of human body systems. Topics include: Body wall and cavities, contents and features of the thorax and abdomen (cardiac, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal systems), pelvis (genito-urinary system), spinal cord and back, innervation and blood supply of the upper and lower limbs, cranial cavities and contents, cranial nerves and blood supply of the head and neck. The majority of the coursework will be done in the cadaver lab, with limited lectures to introduce topics. The lab work will be guided by a lab workbook, handouts and instructor demonstrations. Models, bones (skeletal materials), skulls, and medical images will supplement the cadaver prosections. Lab work will be assessed by the weekly lab assignment, three practical quizzes and a written final exam. A research project will be assigned to allow the student to bridge their knowledge of lab anatomy with more clinical concepts. Students are expected to follow all lab safety guidelines including the cadaver lab dress code; also students should show respect for the cadavers at all times.

Credit for this course is 0.34 units. Enrollment is in the course limited to 15 total, and is limited to students in professional health careers certificate programs.

Prerequisite: BIOL SCI 313. Only students who have completed the prerequisite will be able to register for this course.


View BIOL_SCI 317-CN Sections
Advanced Human Physiology <> BIOL_SCI 318-DL

Advanced Human Physiology is a fully online course that builds on the concepts covered in BIOL SCI 217 Physiology or an equivalent physiology course focusing on the body as an integrated set of systems. Our task will be to construct a global view of the body, its systems, and the many processes that keep the systems working. This course emphasizes an integrated approach to studying all major organ systems including neural, autonomic/somatic motor, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, digestive, and reproductive physiology. In addition to integration, we will focus on the clinical relevance of the organ system that will include abnormal function, disease states, and medications used to bring the system back to normal functioning.

Prerequisites: BIOL SCI 217 Physiology or an equivalent Introduction to Physiology course that provides an introduction to the cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, digestive, endocrine, reproductive, neuronal and autonomic systems.

Note: This course cannot be taken unless the student has previously completed an introductory physiology course.


View BIOL_SCI 318-DL Sections
Quantitative Problem Solving in Chemistry <> CHEM 110-CN

Solution strategies for traditional word problems and their application to basic chemistry quantitative problems: dimensional analysis, chemical equations, stoichiometry, limiting reagents


View CHEM 110-CN Sections
General Chemistry 1 <> CHEM 131-CN

Quantum mechanics, electronic structure, periodic properties of the elements, chemical bonding, thermodynamics, intermolecular forces, properties of solids and liquids, special topics in modern chemistry. Must be taken concurrently with the CHEM 141-CN General Chemistry I Lab. Prerequisite: completion of CHEM 110-CN (grade of C- or better), or current enrollment in CHEM 110-CN.


View CHEM 131-CN Sections
General Chemistry 2 <> CHEM 132-CN

Solutions and colligative properties, chemical equilibrium, aqueous solution equilibria, chemical kinetics, metals in chemistry and biology, oxidation-reduction reactions and electrochemistry, special topics in modern chemistry. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 142-CN General Chemistry Lab 2. Prerequisite: completion of CHEM 131-CN and CHEM 141-CN (grade of C- or better), or current enrollment in CHEM 131-CN/CHEM 141-CN.


View CHEM 132-CN Sections
General Chemistry 1 Lab <> CHEM 141-CN

Chemical analysis of real samples using basic laboratory techniques including titration, colorimetric analysis, density measurements, and atomic spectroscopy. Planning, data collection, interpretation, and reporting on experiments. Credit for this course is 0.34 units. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 131-CN General Chemistry 1. Prerequisite: completion of CHEM 110 (grade of C– or better), or current enrollment in CHEM 110-CN.


View CHEM 141-CN Sections
General Chemistry Lab 2 <> CHEM 142-CN

General Chemistry Lab 2 is a laboratory course in which techniques applied to materials science and nanotechnology, acid-base chemistry, and chemical kinetics will be employed. Major objectives involve work involving planning, data collection, interpretation, and reporting on experiments. Credit for this course is 0.34 units. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 132-CN General Chemistry 2. Prerequisite: completion of CHEM 131-CN and CHEM 141-CN (grade of C- or better), or current enrollment in CHEM 131-CN/CHEM 141-CN.


View CHEM 142-CN Sections
College Physics I <> PHYSICS 130-A

This is the first quarter of a three-quarter algebra-based physics course with lecture and laboratory. Physics is the most basic of the sciences, dealing with the behavior and structure of matter. Lectures and labs illustrate physical principles: mechanics, motion, momentum and energy, and fluids. Continues in winter and spring quarters as PHYSICS 130-B, C. 

Requires concurrent enrollment in the PHYSICS 131-A lab. Two lab sections are available in in Fall 2020; lab times are Tuesdays 8:00-9:50 pm or Saturdays 2:00-3:50 pm.

Prerequisite: college algebra or higher college math course.


View PHYSICS 130-A Sections
College Physics II <> PHYSICS 130-B

This course is the continuation of PHYSICS 130-A algebra-based physics with lecture and laboratory; the sequence concludes with PHYSICS 130-C in the spring quarter. Harnessing the forces of electrical power; how they have altered the way we live and perceive ourselves in the universe. Lecture demonstrations illustrate physical principles: electricity and magnetism, DC and AC circuits. Must be taken concurrently with PHYSICS 131-B Physics Laboratory II. Lab times are Tuesdays 8-9:50 pm; Wednesdays 9-10:50 am; Saturdays 12-1:50 pm; or Saturdays 2-3:50 pm. Labs will meet for the first time after the first lecture session. Prerequisite: completion of PHYSICS 130-A or current enrollment in PHYSICS 130-A.


View PHYSICS 130-B Sections
College Physics III <> PHYSICS 130-C

This course is the continuation of PHYSICS 130-A,B. Wave motion, optics, and introduction to the basic concepts of modern physics including quantum mechanics, relativity, and atomic physics. The course focuses on conceptual understanding of basic physical principles and their real-world applications. Demonstration experiments will be used to illustrate physical phenomena and concepts. Must be taken concurrently with PHYSICS 131-C Physics Laboratory III. Lab times are Tuesdays 8:00-9:50 pm; Wednesdays 9:00-10:50 am; Saturdays 12:00-1:50 pm; or Saturdays 2:00-3:50 pm. Labs will meet for the first time after the first lecture session. Prerequisite: completion of PHYSICS 130-B or current enrollment in PHYSICS 130-B.


View PHYSICS 130-C Sections
Physics Laboratory I <> PHYSICS 131-A

This is the laboratory course associated with PHYSICS 130-A and must be taken concurrently. Credit for this course is .34 units.

Schedule note (updated 8/10/20): All sections of PHYSICS 131-A (100, 102, 110 and 112) are labeled "Synchronous" in CAESAR and will meet remotely only. There will be no on-campus meetings for this lab course. Lab course schedule and details will be announced in Canvas at the beginning of the term.


 


View PHYSICS 131-A Sections
Physics Lab II <> PHYSICS 131-B

This is the laboratory course associated with PHYSICS 130-B and must be taken concurrently. Credit for this course is .34 units.


View PHYSICS 131-B Sections
Physics Lab III <> PHYSICS 131-C

This is the laboratory course associated with PHYSICS 130-C and must be taken concurrently. Credit for this course is .34 units.


View PHYSICS 131-C Sections
Introduction to Statistics <> STAT 202-CN

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of statistics. Throughout the course, students will learn to: summarize data using graphs and tables; explain/calculate descriptive statistics, confidence intervals, correlation, regression, and probability; and explain tests of significance and data-production including sampling and experiments. Basic knowledge of algebra is recommended.


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Introduction to Statistics STAT 202-DL

This course provides an introduction to probability and statistics theory. Assignments and projects help develop students’ analytic and critical thinking skills and challenge them to apply statistical analysis with real world data. The course contains three parts: methods of data collection, techniques for data organization and analysis, and techniques for interpreting data using statistical methodologies. Students will learn not only how to appropriately collect and analyze data, but how to draw conclusions from their data for use in decision-making. The course emphasizes use of Microsoft Excel for graphing and data analysis in homework assignments. Students will also collect and analyze a data set of personal interest for the final project. A final paper will also be prepared. Microsoft Excel and PowerPoint techniques relevant to the final project will be taught in class, however, a basic understanding of these applications is expected. This course is conducted completely online. A technology fee will be added to tuition.


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