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Program Overview

Public Policy & Administration

Master's in Public Policy and Administration

Most graduate programs in public policy require students to choose between the analytical and the administrative sides of the discipline. Northwestern’s part-time Master's in Public Policy and Administration degree program encompasses both. While instilling leadership skills, this on-campus or online program develops students’ administrative as well as analytical competence to enable them to rise in the field and drive change at the local, national and international levels. This public policy master's degree program encompasses a range of MPPA specializations — public administration, public policy, global policy — all grounded in the perspective that policy challenges are fluid, interconnected and global. Students learn to think across diverse groups and boundaries.

The MA in Public Policy and Administration is a versatile degree that applies to a variety of areas across all career sectors, private as well as public. MPPA graduates achieve leadership roles in government at the local, state and federal levels, in nonprofit organizations, and in the private sector. Public Policy and Administration graduate students pursue rewarding careers in health service, community service, in management consulting jobs, with financial institutions, in social entrepreneurial organizations, urban and regional planning, political science research and foreign affairs. 

All courses are fully accredited. SPS online courses marry the best aspects of online technology with the interactivity of the classroom. Students can take any combination of online and on-campus courses, or all online or all on-campus, to complete their degree. Find out more about online learning at SPS.

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JC Kibbey

Not only was [behavioral economics] interesting to me academically, but those ideas have helped inform my professional work. In the world of politics, a lot of the questions are about how people are going to react to situations.”

— JC Kibbey (MPPA '14), Outreach and Policy Advocate at Union of Concerned Scientists

About the MA in Public Policy and Administration

Master's in Public Policy and Administration Program Goals

An interdisciplinary professional program, MPPA graduates will possess the knowledge, skills and aptitude to:

  • Evaluate the collaborative inter-organizational, inter-governmental, and international public policy and administrative environment
  • Apply a standard of ethics to policy and administrative context
  • Design public policies and programs
  • Evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of public policies and programs
  • Communicate relevant policy or program information to diverse stakeholders
  • Lead public organizations to implement policy decisions with respect and understanding for the broader institutional, societal, economic and political environment
  • Manage public resources to achieve organizational goals

MA in Public Policy and Administration Areas of Specialization

Students can focus on a particular area of interest by selecting one of the MA in Public Policy and Administration Specializations as part of the application process. Students can also choose the "generalist" designation, which allows them to take their electives from different specializations.

Public Policy and Administration Curriculum

Students are required to complete 13 courses to earn the degree. The curriculum covers nine core courses, three elective courses corresponding to a chosen area of specialization, and a capstone course or thesis project. Review curriculum details and elective choices while you consider applying to this program. Current students should refer to the curriculum requirements in place at time of entry into the program.

Public Policy and Administration Courses

Explore Public Policy and Administration Courses. You can narrow your course search by day, location or instructor.

Master's in Public Policy and Administration Admission

A variety of factors are considered when your application is reviewed. Background and experience vary from student to student. For a complete list of requirements, see the Master's in Public Policy & Administration Admission page.

MPPA Tuition and Financial Aid

Tuition for the Master's in Public Policy and Administration program at Northwestern is comparable to similar US programs. Financial aid opportunities exist for students at Northwestern. Complete details can be found on the MPPA Tuition and Financial Aid pages.

Registration Information for Public Policy and Administration

Already accepted into the Master's in Public Policy and Administration program? Get ahead and register for your classes as soon as possible.

Public Policy and Administration Careers

Professional opportunities for graduates of Northwestern's MPPA program are as broad and varied as the field of public policy and administration itself. With five concentrations to choose from, MPPA graduates set their sights on leadership roles in government at the local, regional and federal levels, in nonprofit organizations or in private enterprise.  For details visit the Public Policy and Administration Career Options page.

Public Policy and Administration Faculty

Instructors in the Master's in Public Policy and Administration program at Northwestern are leading scholars and practitioners in their field. They bring real-world experiences to the  classroom and engage with students on a personal level. Get to know the instructors on our Public Policy and Administration Faculty page. 

MPPA Student Leadership Council

Learn about the MPPA Student Leadership Council and their efforts to create and host network events for the program.


Find out more about Northwestern's MA in Public Policy and Administration

Core Courses:Course Detail
Research Methods <> MPPA 401-0 OR 401-DL

This course provides students with a basic understanding of qualitative and quantitative research methodology frequently used in social science and policy research. The course content includes research question formation, observation and interview based research methods, analysis of qualitative data, survey development, and weighting and sampling techniques. Students will have the opportunity to apply methods to pursue a research topic of their own design. An overview of publicly available quantitative data will be provided, and comparative policy research will be discussed.

 


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Research Methods <> MPPA 401-DL

This course provides students with a basic understanding of qualitative and quantitative research methodology frequently used in social science and policy research. The course content includes research question formation, observation and interview based research methods, analysis of qualitative data, survey development, and weighting and sampling techniques. Students will have the opportunity to apply methods to pursue a research topic of their own design. An overview of publicly available quantitative data will be provided, and comparative policy research will be discussed.

Required as a core course for students admitted for fall 2012 and after. Counts toward all MPPA specializations as an elective for students admitted prior to fall 2012.


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Elements of Public Finance and Budgeting <> MPPA 402-0 OR 402-DL

Public budgeting is one of the most important responsibilities of democratic governance. The budget defines policy, sets priorities, allocates scarce public resources, and distributes the burden of paying for public goods and services. The budget is inescapably both a political document and a management tool. The purpose of this course is to understand the complexities of the budget process and its central role in both democratic institutions and the profession of public administration. Students will be introduced to the public budgetary process and to key budget theories, practices, and methodologies. The budget structure and process will be reviewed as well as the role of the public administrator and other participants in the process. The course will also examine politics in the budget process and the role of interest groups in decision-making; more specifically, the role of politics in both establishing public spending priorities and in distributing the burden of taxes and fees. Lastly, students will learn about concepts and methodologies relating to program cost analysis and how the budget may be used as a management tool.

 


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Elements of Public Finance and Budgeting <> MPPA 402-DL

Public budgeting is one of the most important responsibilities of democratic governance. The budget defines policy, sets priorities, allocates scarce public resources, and distributes the burden of paying for public goods and services. The budget is inescapably both a political document and a management tool. The purpose of this course is to understand the complexities of the budget process and its central role in both democratic institutions and the profession of public administration. Students will be introduced to the public budgetary process and to key budget theories, practices, and methodologies. The budget structure and process will be reviewed as well as the role of the public administrator and other participants in the process. The course will also examine politics in the budget process and the role of interest groups in decision-making; more specifically, the role of politics in both establishing public spending priorities and in distributing the burden of taxes and fees. Lastly, students will learn about concepts and methodologies relating to program cost analysis and how the budget may be used as a management tool.


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Fundamentals of Public Administration <> MPPA 403-0 OR 403-DL

This course is an introduction to the basic skills useful to public administrators and policy analysts seeking to work in an analytical or managerial position in the public or not-for profit-sectors. This course is structured to introduce students to both the principles and contextual constraints that form the environment of the modern public administrator. It will cover a basic understanding of the process, policy, and politics of public administration and public management at the national, state, and local level. Fundamental theories, practices, and concepts that contribute to the administration and understanding of complex public sector organizations are explored, as well as basic practices and techniques of modern public administration. The course assumes a basic foundation in political science theory, public policy, or public administration usually garnered at the undergraduate level as well as a working knowledge of contemporary issues that confront governments today. Counts toward all MPPA specializations as an elective for students admitted prior to fall 2006. Required as a core course for students admitted for fall 2006 and after.

 


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Fundamentals of Public Administration <> MPPA 403-DL

This course is an introduction to the basic skills useful to public administrators and policy analysts seeking to work in an analytical or managerial position in the public or not-for profit-sectors. This course is structured to introduce students to both the principles and contextual constraints that form the environment of the modern public administrator. It will cover a basic understanding of the process, policy, and politics of public administration and public management at the national, state, and local level. Fundamental theories, practices, and concepts that contribute to the administration and understanding of complex public sector organizations are explored, as well as basic practices and techniques of modern public administration. The course assumes a basic foundation in political science theory, public policy, or public administration usually garnered at the undergraduate level as well as a working knowledge of contemporary issues that confront governments today. Counts toward all MPPA specializations as an elective for students admitted prior to fall 2006. Required as a core course for students admitted for fall 2006 and after.


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Microeconomics for Policy and Administration <> MPPA 404-0 OR 404-DL

Economics is about choice, and microeconomics is the study of resource allocation choices, beginning with how consumers and producers make choices. This course is aimed at developing student understanding of microeconomic theory, especially as it concerns the relationship between the market economy and public policy. Topics include consumer behavior and the theory of demand; production, cost, supply functions; choices under uncertainty, insurance; competitive equilibrium; subsidies, taxes, price controls; monopoly and monopsony; price discrimination and public utility pricing; monopolistic competition; general equilibrium theory and welfare economics; information theory; and public goods, externalities and market failure.

Counts toward all MPPA specializations as an elective for on-campus students admitted prior to fall 2012.


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Microeconomics for Policy and Administration <> MPPA 404-DL

Economics is about choice, and microeconomics is the study of resource allocation choices, beginning with how consumers and producers make choices. This course is aimed at developing student understanding of microeconomic theory, especially as it concerns the relationship between the market economy and public policy. Topics include consumer behavior and the theory of demand; production, cost, supply functions; choices under uncertainty, insurance; competitive equilibrium; subsidies, taxes, price controls; monopoly and monopsony; price discrimination and public utility pricing; monopolistic competition; general equilibrium theory and welfare economics; information theory; and public goods, externalities and market failure.

Counts toward all MPPA specializations as an elective for on-campus students admitted prior to fall 2012.


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Statistics for Research <> MPPA 405-0 OR 405-DL

This course teaches students the fundamentals of measuring political data, summarizing observations, and analyzing contingency tables. Descriptive statistics, including central tendency, dispersion, and data display; probability; distributions, including binomial and normal; inference, including confidence intervals and hypothesis testing; correlation; bivariate regression; contingency tables and chi-square. MPPA core course. Students will do homework using SPSS, a statistical software package. SPSS is installed in some Northwestern computer labs and can be rented (downloaded to your personal computer)from https://estore.onthehub.com. The Graduate Pack 23 is sufficient for class.

 


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Statistics for Research <> MPPA 405-DL

This course teaches students the fundamentals of measuring political data, summarizing observations, and analyzing contingency tables. Descriptive statistics, including central tendency, dispersion, and data display; probability; distributions, including binomial and normal; inference, including confidence intervals and hypothesis testing; correlation; bivariate regression; contingency tables and chi-square. MPPA core course. Students will do homework using SPSS, a statistical software package. SPSS is installed in some Northwestern computer labs and can be rented (downloaded to your personal computer)from https://estore.onthehub.com. The Graduate Pack 23 is sufficient for class.


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Analytic Methods <> MPPA 406-0 OR 406-DL

This course will expose students to a set of tools and principles that fall under the heading of "analytic methods." These methods help public policy and program analysts systematically value decisions, improve the decision-making process (and hopefully the resultant decisions), value inputs and outcomes, handle uncertainty, and compare aspects of public policy and systems that might not otherwise appear to be comparable. Topics include discounting techniques, cost-benefit analysis, decision theory, difference equations, and elements of microeconomic analysis.

 


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Analytic Methods for Policy Analysis <> MPPA 406-DL

This course will expose students to a set of tools and principles that fall under the heading of "analytic methods." These methods help public policy and program analysts systematically value decisions, improve the decision-making process (and hopefully the resultant decisions), value inputs and outcomes, handle uncertainty, and compare aspects of public policy and systems that might not otherwise appear to be comparable. Topics include discounting techniques, cost-benefit analysis, decision theory, difference equations, and elements of microeconomic analysis.


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Scope and Theory of Public Policy <> MPPA 407-0 OR 407-DL

This course is an introduction to the public policy process in the United States. It focuses on developing an understanding of what "political" and "public policy" mean and how public policy is made. The course considers agenda setting, decision making theory and methods of analyzing policy outcomes. Course materials will provide students with the analytical framework to explore why some problems reach the public agenda, why some solutions are adopted and others rejected, and why some policies appear to succeed while others appear to fail. It will examine policy making primarily at the national level but will also look at examples at the state and local level.

 


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Scope and Theory of Public Policy <> MPPA 407-DL

This course is an introduction to the public policy process in the United States. It focuses on developing an understanding of what "political" and "public policy" mean and how public policy is made. The course considers agenda setting, decision making theory and methods of analyzing policy outcomes. Course materials will provide students with the analytical framework to explore why some problems reach the public agenda, why some solutions are adopted and others rejected, and why some policies appear to succeed while others appear to fail. It will examine policy making primarily at the national level but will also look at examples at the state and local level.


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Public Organization Theory & Management <> MPPA 408-0 OR 408-DL

This course focuses on organization theory and management as it applies primarily to public organizations. The unique environment that public organizations face will be emphasized. Students will study a range of theories grounded in the traditional literature over time and leading to contemporary theories and modern application in the public sector. The course requires students to critically examine public organizations and leadership using theories and concepts studied during the class.

 

Previously titled Organization Theory and Analysis. Students admitted prior to Fall 2015 who take the new version of the class may substitute a specialization course for LEADERS 481.

 


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Public Organization Theory & Management <> MPPA 408-DL

This course focuses on organization theory and management as it applies primarily to public organizations. The unique environment that public organizations face will be emphasized. Students will study a range of theories grounded in the traditional literature over time and leading to contemporary theories and modern application in the public sector. The course requires students to critically examine public organizations and leadership using theories and concepts studied during the class.

Previously titled Organization Theory and Analysis. Students admitted prior to Fall 2015 who take the new version of the class may substitute a specialization course for LEADERS 481.


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Strategies for Effective Writing and Communication <> MPPA 409-0 OR 409-DL

The course emphasizes research and writing skills and affords students the opportunity to discover the various approaches to designed research as well as recognize and address the strengths and weaknesses in their own critical thinking and writing skills. To reinforce the concepts covered in the course, students will be asked to produce assignments essential to successful research projects as well as written pieces designed to demonstrate knowledge of topics and proficiency in writing skills. Topics vary.

Required for students admitted fall 2007 and after. Previously titled Applied Research and Writing.


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Capstone Project <> MPPA 498-0 OR 498-DL

The capstone project course is the culmination of the MPPA program and demonstrates to faculty a student's mastery of the curriculum and core competencies in the public policy and administration field. Working both in small groups and individually, students complete a comprehensive project chosen in conjunction with their instructor. Students are individually assessed and graded throughout duration of class.Students should retain all course material from previous classes in the program, including textbooks, to successfully complete assignments.

Students may choose this course or registration in the 590 individual thesis research to fulfill their capstone requirement.

Pre-requisite: completion of at least 11 courses and a 3.0 GPA.

The on-campus Spring 2018 section will meet April 7, April 21, May 5, and May 26 from 9am - 5pm.


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Capstone Project <> MPPA 498-DL

The capstone project course is the culmination of the MPPA program and demonstrates to faculty a student's mastery of the curriculum and core competencies in the public policy and administration field. Working both in small groups and individually, students complete a comprehensive project chosen in conjunction with their instructor. Students are individually assessed and graded throughout duration of class.Students should retain all course material from previous classes in the program, including textbooks, to successfully complete assignments.

Students may choose this course or registration in the 590 individual thesis research to fulfill their capstone requirement.

Pre-requisite: completion of at least 11 courses and a 3.0 GPA.

The on-campus Spring 2018 section will meet April 7, April 21, May 5, and May 26 from 9am - 5pm.


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Thesis Research <> MPPA 590-0

This final project is meant to represent the culmination of students’ experience in the program and must demonstrate mastery of the curriculum and ability to conduct sustained independent research and analysis. The project may be applied or may be a traditional scholarly paper, in both cases a write-up following the paper’s program-specific guidelines is required. Students must submit a proposal and secure a first reader in order to register; for further details students are advised to review the student handbook and contact their academic advisor.


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Elective Courses:Course Detail
The Legislative Process <> MPPA 411-0 OR 411-DL

Examines the organization of legislatures that make public policy; specifically, how a bill on Capitol Hill becomes the law of the land. Topics include House and Senate procedure, parliamentary maneuvers, committees, structural issues, information issues, re-election concerns, and partisanship.

Required core course in the distance learning program for students admitted before fall 2012. Track course for students admitted fall 2012 and after. Counts toward the Public Administration and Public Policy specializations.


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The Legislative Process <> MPPA 411-DL

Examines the organization of legislatures that make public policy; specifically, how a bill on Capitol Hill becomes the law of the land. Topics include House and Senate procedure, parliamentary maneuvers, committees, structural issues, information issues, re-election concerns, and partisanship.

Required core course in the distance learning program for students admitted before fall 2012. Track course for students admitted fall 2012 and after. Counts toward the Public Administration and Public Policy specializations.


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The Nonprofit/NGO Sector <> MPPA 413-0 OR 413-DL

This course examines theories of nonprofit (NPO) and nongovernmental organization (NGO) development and operation. Broad trends shaping NPOs/NGOs, both nationally and globally, are studied from a variety of perspectives. Also, high level operational issues, such as governance and executive management in the NPO/NGO environment, are discussed. 

Counts toward the Public Administration specialization for students admitted fall 2012 and after. Online students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective in lieu of 411, 419 or 452. All on-campus students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective.


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Foundations of the Nonprofit/NGO Sector <> MPPA 413-DL

This course examines theories of nonprofit (NPO) and nongovernmental organization (NGO) development and operation. Broad trends shaping NPOs/NGOs, both nationally and globally, are studied from a variety of perspectives. Also, high level operational issues, such as governance and executive management in the NPO/NGO environment, are discussed.

Counts toward the Public Administration specialization for students admitted fall 2012 and after. Online students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective in lieu of 411, 419 or 452. All on-campus students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective.


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Public Human Resources <> MPPA 417-0 OR 417-DL

This course is designed to develop students' practical understanding of public human resource management. It is structured to examine the relationships between contemporary public policy-making processes, legal and ethical standards of public human resource management, and key human resource functions. Students will analyze how strategic human resource management and positive organizational frameworks apply to key public human resource functions, including recruiting and retention, compensation and benefits, and skill development. The course will also provide students with action-oriented learning to value the impact of current public policy issues, such as healthcare and immigration reforms, on public organizations in general.

Counts toward the Public Administration specialization for students admitted fall 2012 and after. Online students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective in lieu of 411, 419, or 452. All on-campus students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective.


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Public Human Resources <> MPPA 417-DL

This course is designed to develop students' practical understanding of public human resource management. It is structured to examine the relationships between contemporary public policy-making processes, legal and ethical standards of public human resource management, and key human resource functions. Students will analyze how strategic human resource management and positive organizational frameworks apply to key public human resource functions, including recruiting and retention, compensation and benefits, and skill development. The course will also provide students with action-oriented learning to value the impact of current public policy issues, such as healthcare and immigration reforms, on public organizations in general.

Counts toward the Public Administration specialization for students admitted fall 2012 and after. Online students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective in lieu of 411, 419, or 452. All on-campus students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective.


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Ethics and Leadership <> MPPA 418-0

This course will examine relevant theory and research regarding ethics and leadership in public organizations and provide an opportunity for students to develop a personal foundation for ethical leadership. Students will also look at ethics and leadership from an organizational and systemic level while applying learning to normative questions and case studies.

Counts toward the Public Administration, Public Policy, and Global Policy specializations.


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Ethics and Leadership <> MPPA 418-DL

This course will examine relevant theory and research regarding ethics and leadership in public organizations and provide an opportunity for students to develop a personal foundation for ethical leadership. Students will also look at ethics and leadership from an organizational and systemic level while applying learning to normative questions and case studies.

Counts toward the Public Administration, Public Policy, and Global Policy specializations.


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The Strategic Policy Environment <> MPPA 419-0

The purpose of this course is to provide students an opportunity to study public policy in a holistic fashion while at the same time focusing on development, implementation, and the evaluation of public policy.This is accomplished by critically analyzing public policy theory and practice alongside a case-study driven examination of public policy successes and failures.The course maintains an emphasis on strategic public policy development, implementation, and evaluation. Counts toward the Public Policy specialization.

Previously titled Strategic Policy Implementation.


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The Strategic Policy Environment <> MPPA 419-DL

The purpose of this course is to provide students an opportunity to study public policy in a holistic fashion while at the same time focusing on development, implementation, and the evaluation of public policy.This is accomplished by critically analyzing public policy theory and practice alongside a case-study driven examination of public policy successes and failures.The course maintains an emphasis on strategic public policy development, implementation, and evaluation. Counts toward the Public Policy specialization.

Previously titled Strategic Policy Implementation.


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Behavioral Economics <> MPPA 430-0 OR 430-DL

Why do people not recycle, even when offered monetary incentives? Why has the 'War on Drugs' failed? Why don't people enroll in 401(k) savings plans? Why is the market for knock-off brand-name goods and pirated DVDs/software so large? This class will use behavioral economics to investigate questions related to policy formulation, implementation, framing and failure. With readings from current experts in the field including Ariely, Thaler, Kahneman and Frank, this class will discuss both behavioral economic theory and its application in policy areas such as immigration, the environment, health care, international relations and (of course) the national economy. Counts toward all specializations.


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Behavioral Economics <> MPPA 430-DL

Why do people not recycle, even when offered monetary incentives? Why has the 'War on Drugs' failed? Why don't people enroll in 401(k) savings plans? Why is the market for knock-off brand-name goods and pirated DVDs/software so large? This class will use behavioral economics to investigate questions related to policy formulation, implementation, framing and failure. With readings from current experts in the field including Ariely, Thaler, Kahneman and Frank, this class will discuss both behavioral economic theory and its application in policy areas such as immigration, the environment, health care, international relations and (of course) the national economy. Counts toward all specializations.


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Intergovernmental Relations <> MPPA 432-0 OR 432-DL

This course is designed to develop students’ practical understanding of American intergovernmental relations and intergovernmental management. The course is structured to examine contemporary relationships between U.S. federalism and public policy making processes at the federal, state, and local levels. It will also provide a comparative view of federalism, recognizing differences in the developing world as well as increased international relationships due to globalization. Students will analyze how various theories of intergovernmental relations apply to key areas of public policy making—federalism and the courts, fiscal federalism, and regulatory federalism. Students will engage in action-oriented learning to synthesize theories of intergovernmental relations and institutions to recommend policy programs and appraise future policy reform.

Counts toward the Public Policy specialization for students admitted fall 2012 and after. Online students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective in lieu of 411, 419, or 452. All on-campus students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective.


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Intergovernmental Relations <> MPPA 432-DL

This course is designed to develop students’ practical understanding of American intergovernmental relations and intergovernmental management. The course is structured to examine contemporary relationships between U.S. federalism and public policy making processes at the federal, state, and local levels. It will also provide a comparative view of federalism, recognizing differences in the developing world as well as increased international relationships due to globalization. Students will analyze how various theories of intergovernmental relations apply to key areas of public policy making—federalism and the courts, fiscal federalism, and regulatory federalism. Students will engage in action-oriented learning to synthesize theories of intergovernmental relations and institutions to recommend policy programs and appraise future policy reform.

Counts toward the Public Policy specialization for students admitted fall 2012 and after. Online students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective in lieu of 411, 419, or 452. All on-campus students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective.


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Regulatory Policy <> MPPA 435-0 OR 435-DL

This is an advanced specialization course in the politics and practice of governmental regulation, designed to give students the tools needed to understand the many facets of regulatory politics. It will cover broad areas of regulatory policy and procedure from communications, to environment, to consumer products. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to understand, articulate, and assess the political debates around regulatory policy and approaches to regulation. Additionally, students will be able develop policy solutions to address various regulatory problems using standard regulatory tools and best practices.

Counts toward the Public Policy specialization.


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Regulatory Policy <> MPPA 435-DL

This is an advanced specialization course in the politics and practice of governmental regulation, designed to give students the tools needed to understand the many facets of regulatory politics. It will cover broad areas of regulatory policy and procedure from communications, to environment, to consumer products. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to understand, articulate, and assess the political debates around regulatory policy and approaches to regulation. Additionally, students will be able develop policy solutions to address various regulatory problems using standard regulatory tools and best practices.

Counts toward the Public Policy specialization for students admitted fall 2012 and after. Online students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective in lieu of 411, 419, or 452. All on-campus students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective.


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International Institutions <> MPPA 440-0

This class examines several prominent international organizations, including the United Nations, NATO, the European Union, and the World Trade Organization. The course will focus on both policy controversies and broader theoretical analysis. Students will address why each organization was created, its institutional structure, and current problems confronting each organization. The effects of international organizations on world politics will also be examined. Some of the key questions that will be addressed are: How do IOs foster interstate cooperation and state compliance? How do IOs shape state interests and identities? Why do IOs often fail? How should we think about the pathologies of IOs as global bureaucracies? How do IOs influence NGOs and their strategies? Particular emphasis will be placed on students' ability to think critically, both about the nature of problems that face states as well as development of global governance mechanisms.

Counts toward the Global Policy specialization for students admitted fall 2012 and after. Online students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective in lieu of 411, 419, or 452. All on-campus students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective.


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International Institutions <> MPPA 440-DL

This class examines several prominent international organizations, including the United Nations, NATO, the European Union, and the World Trade Organization. The course will focus on both policy controversies and broader theoretical analysis. Students will address why each organization was created, its institutional structure, and current problems confronting each organization. The effects of international organizations on world politics will also be examined. Some of the key questions that will be addressed are: How do IOs foster interstate cooperation and state compliance? How do IOs shape state interests and identities? Why do IOs often fail? How should we think about the pathologies of IOs as global bureaucracies? How do IOs influence NGOs and their strategies? Particular emphasis will be placed on students' ability to think critically, both about the nature of problems that face states as well as development of global governance mechanisms.

Counts toward the Global Policy specialization for students admitted fall 2012 and after. Online students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective in lieu of 411, 419, or 452. All on-campus students admitted prior to fall 2012 may take this elective.


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Global Economic Policy <> MPPA 450-0 OR 450-DL

The goal of this course is to give students the knowledge, tools, and confidence to understand, craft, and advocate for incentives and economic policies. Students will be able to apply macroeconomic principles, draw conclusions about the relevance of economic incentives, and explain in substantial detail the current debates covering such topics as economic systems, international trade, monetary policy, global resource allocation, and development economics. While a working understanding of undergraduate-level microeconomics is helpful, and it is recommended students take 404 Microeconomics first, the content of this course will cover these areas in sufficient detail for students without any background. Counts toward the Global Policy specialization. Previously titled International Macroeconomic Policy

The Fall 2017 section starts at 6:30pm and runs until 9:30. The class will not meet Oct. 5 and Oct. 12.


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Global Economic Policy <> MPPA 450-DL

The goal of this course is to give students the knowledge, tools, and confidence to understand, craft, and advocate for incentives and economic policies. Students will be able to apply macroeconomic principles, draw conclusions about the relevance of economic incentives, and explain in substantial detail the current debates covering such topics as economic systems, international trade, monetary policy, global resource allocation, and development economics. While a working understanding of undergraduate-level microeconomics is helpful, and it is recommended students take 404 Microeconomics first, the content of this course will cover these areas in sufficient detail for students without any background. Counts toward the Global Policy specialization. Previously titled International Macroeconomic Policy

The Fall 2017 section starts at 6:30pm and runs until 9:30. The class will not meet Oct. 5 and Oct. 12.


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The Global City <> MPPA 452-DL

Why do cities persist? The last decade has seen a resurgence in the economies of some major cities -- especially the global cities of this course's title -- while other post-industrial cities continue a long decline. Cities are now being transformed by the information revolution much as cities were transformed by the industrial revolution two centuries ago. In this course, students will develop an understanding of urbanization, including how city form differs depending on when a city experiences its greatest growth, and how globalization produces increasing disparity (in many ways) between rich and poor. The course will cover concepts in economic geography, transportation, environment, governance, development, poverty and inequality, and limits to growth. Readings will include recent studies on the effect of globalization on cities, including Saskia Sassen's Cities in a World Economy.

Elective for on-campus students. Core course for the MPPA distance learning program for students admitted before fall 2012. Elective course for students admitted fall 2012 and after.


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The Global City <> MPPA 452-DL

Why do cities persist? The last decade has seen a resurgence in the economies of some major cities -- especially the global cities of this course's title -- while other post-industrial cities continue a long decline. Cities are now being transformed by the information revolution much as cities were transformed by the industrial revolution two centuries ago. In this course, students will develop an understanding of urbanization, including how city form differs depending on when a city experiences its greatest growth, and how globalization produces increasing disparity (in many ways) between rich and poor. The course will cover concepts in economic geography, transportation, environment, governance, development, poverty and inequality, and limits to growth. Readings will include recent studies on the effect of globalization on cities, including Saskia Sassen's Cities in a World Economy.

Core course for the MPPA distance learning program for students admitted before fall 2012. Elective course for students admitted fall 2012 and after.


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Special Topics: US and Global Environmental Policy <> MPPA 490-DL

Climate and environment are among the most complex and consequential arenas of 21st century public policy. This course will provide an overview of major US environmental laws and the court cases interpreting them, and will also explore initiatives to reach international agree-ment on global environmental threats such as climate change. We will address habitat and natural resource protection, explore the limits of federal power to mediate between private resource extraction and public property rights, and learn the frameworks and standards for protection of US surface waters and air quality. We will address how federalism operates in addressing issues as diverse as land use planning and solid waste disposal, and explore elements and effectiveness of different policy frameworks for environmental protection regimes. We will examine the roles of environmental NGOs in US and international debates over standards and enforcement. We will review case studies of regional cooperation among groups of states and nations. We will study the international climate regime, identifying the primary scientific sources of climate change data, and how they set the parameters for international climate policy, and discuss the future prospects of the Paris climate accord following the 2016 US elections.

Counts toward the Global Policy and Public Policy specializations.


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Special Topic:Demography, Global Health and Policy <> MPPA 490-DL

Demography is the formal study of population size/structure and factors associated with its change (i.e., fertility, migration, and mortality). Developing a theoretical and technical understanding of demographic tools can provide a better understanding of population dynamics and how this influences national and global health, as well as regional and national policy. This course provides such a framework by drawing upon seminal readings from demography, economics, public health, and sociology. We will examine issues relating to global aging, old-age dependency ratios, and social policy with respect to Italy, Japan, and the U.S. We will explore fertility and family planning polices with respect to Finland and Sweden. We will also discuss fertility by focusing on China and India. The course will also introduce health policy concepts relating to health care systems/access/disparities with respect to the U.S. and developing countries.

Counts toward the Public Policy, Global Policy, and Global Health specializations.


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Special Topics: US Foreign Policy <> MPPA 490-DL

This course explores contemporary relations between the United States and the world. The primary goal is to give students conceptual and critical tools to understand and analyze how international relations theory, U.S. foreign policy decisions, and current events fit together. It is designed to develop students’ capacity both to explain the foreign policy-making process in the United States, and to better understand the underlying patterns, logic, and implications of American foreign policy in the world at large. The course is divided into three main topics. First, students will discuss the theory that grounds U.S. foreign policy, focusing on U.S. power in the world. The second part of the class will examine the public policy institutions and processes that guide foreign policy formation and implementation. Finally, the last third of the course will review some of the more salient foreign policy challenges facing the U.S. in the 21st century, including a focus on geographic regions. We will discuss how the recent global economic crises may influence foreign policy, and how terrorism and democracy promotion continue to shape U.S. foreign policy.

Counts toward the Global Policy and Public Policy specializations.


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Global Policy Lab MPPA 580-DL

The goal of the class is to provide students with a hands on opportunity to apply core skillsets from the MPPA program, particularly as they relate to an organization facing global, social and economic policy challenges. Students will work for a client organization on a commissioned project supervised by an MPPA faculty member. The goal of the client project is to analyze a specific challenge facing the organization, then develop a set of policy recommendations for the client. Students will work in teams to produce final deliverables. The project will culminate in a live client briefing and a written report (so one site visit by a student team representative may be required). Students should expect to spend 20 hours per week on the course.

Counts toward all specializations.

Pre-requisite: completion of at least 6 courses.


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